Would You Work For This Company?

Topic 26761 | Page 1

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Ron Wells's Comment
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So I am working for a company that has 6 trucks . They used to have 11 but in 11 inspections they had 6 OOS. The truck they gave me the RPM doesn't work and the Speedometer is stuck at 70mph and starts there and when I give it gas it runs into the fuel needle. Also the secondary air tank gauge doesn't work also. The company has a conditional rating which means I rarely ever get to bypass a weigh station plus we haul heavy we have permits for up to 100,000 gross. We don't go out of state much so we still use paper logbooks. Also I was going to take a load to Oregon today and saw that the trailer didn't have registration and my dispatcher didn't get me a permit to enter Oregon. My question is what would you do if you worked for a company like this?

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

You are driving heavy hauls... so you are an experienced driver. WHY would you risk your CDL for this company?

any one DOT violation was b3 enough for me to quit if not repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Run, Run, Run. There are too many reasons in my mind to list. Get out of there before you end up in a situation that will end your driving career.

Cornelius A.'s Comment
member avatar

I have seen many companies go from 100 trucks to 0 because of their conditional rating. Very hard to insure most times they end up paying between $25k to $35k per power unit that is if you are lucky to have a company that will accept to insure you

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Ron, your profile says that "local trucking is your passion." That's a curious statement based on this post!

What's the deal? You are making it abundantly clear why we never recommend newbies get started with a local company or a small trucking operation. Maybe you're starting to see the wisdom of our solid advice.

Ron Wells's Comment
member avatar

I get it. But what would you do if you discovered these things ? Would you quit the day you found this out?

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Actually I never would have driven one of their trucks if it wouldn't pass my own pre-trip inspection. Who wants to get put out of service at a weigh station? The driver is responsible for the truck he leaves with on his trip. If it's not road worthy he will catch the blame.

You're asking the wrong question.

If you'd like to rack up a bunch of CSA violations and citations against your license (your resume) just stick with what you're doing. Otherwise I would have quit that job on my very first day, or they would have fired me for refusing to drive.

You made a mistake. Move on, and try to learn something from it.

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Ron asks:

But what would you do if you discovered these things ? Would you quit the day you found this out?

Here's an interesting thing about CDL holders: You do not need to be unemployed if yo don't want to. True, maybe you'll end up OTR and gone from the family for a while, but just keep that in mind - you can always have a paycheck. You could then keep a look out for a local job as they come up.

If I was hired at Chicago Rockford And Peoria Logistics and In my first pretrip found these problems, I'd be in the shop (if they have one) and in the dispatch office. Remember a basic rule of truck driving: The driver is responsible for the whole truck. And yes, if the DM said "We can't fix it today", then I'd walk out to my own car.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Junkyard Dog's Comment
member avatar

Not trying to be political here but did anyone miss his Avatar is George Soros? Is this guy trying to play some kind of game? Just asking...

Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar

Not trying to be political here but did anyone miss his Avatar is George Soros? Is this guy trying to play some kind of game? Just asking...

Ron Wells is also a Spokane developer who pled guilty to mail fraud.

Ron Wells Spokane Developer

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