Bump Dock Pay

Topic 26775 | Page 1

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Carl P.'s Comment
member avatar

I was researching companies. One company is listing Bump Dock Pay as a benefit. I tried Googling the term, but no luck. Need some knowledge.

Averitt Driver Pay Loading / Unloading pay (Over 90% No-Touch Freight) Stop pay Breakdown pay Layover pay Bump Dock pay Driver referral reward program

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

It is probably what is also known as accessory pay. Examples are pay to tarp/untarp loads, border crossings, multiple stops, driver assist with unloading, hazmat loads, northeast pay, NY City pay.

I think that “bump dock pay” is meaning multiple stop loads, where a portion of the trailer is loaded or unloaded.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

ChrisEMT's Comment
member avatar

Usually, at least for Werner (they call it stop pay on certain accounts), it is a set amount that they pay you for every stop you make. For example, on my last account, my normal Monday run had 5 stops, plus starting and ending at the DC (which are not considered stops). Each stop paid $15 * 5 stops = $75 + mileage + assist unload pay of $20. I was averaging approx 62 cpm every week at 2200 miles which equaled about $1200 +/- every week...

Hope this helps. Chris

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

I've heard the term used to mean "bumping" a trailer from one dock door to another. This could be even from one local warehouse to another. Once I did get a request: I was at one facility to deliver a load. My DM asked me to go to another place 1/2 mile away to get a repaired trailer and bring it to the main trailer yard. I made $50 for the 1/2 mile move.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Shaun C.'s Comment
member avatar

I've heard the term used to mean "bumping" a trailer from one dock door to another. This could be even from one local warehouse to another. Once I did get a request: I was at one facility to deliver a load. My DM asked me to go to another place 1/2 mile away to get a repaired trailer and bring it to the main trailer yard. I made $50 for the 1/2 mile move.

Errol you are exactly correct. Once had to unhook from my trailer, move another trailer and put my trailer in the dock. That is an example of bump dock. I currently work for averitt.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Carl P.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank You for clarification. Bump Pay is unhooking trailer, moving another trailer, then moving main trailer to dock. Yes, More pay.lol

Old School's Comment
member avatar
I was researching companies.

Carl, you can actually waste a lot of good time doing this. If you're in school, you should start filling out applications. Use this link to Apply For Truck Driving Jobs.

You'd think with all you hear about driver demand that you're gonna have all kinds of lucrative offers, but not everyone will reach out to you. By using our application process you can fill out one app and send it to multiple companies. Start doing your research after you get a few offers. That will save you a lot of wasted energy.

Don't worry about all those different types of accessory pay. It's not an important factor in your job search.

Focus on...

1) The type of freight you want to haul.

2) The area of the country you want to run.

3) The hometime policy that you need.

Those are the three things that should govern your decision for your first company.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

A good point by Old School:

Carl, you can actually waste a lot of good time doing this.

Yes, worrying about the other pay points besides your main job is a waste of time. Once someone asked about (manual) shifting to make the best MPG. Well, the time & distance spent in shifting your transmission is microscopic, or less, than the miles rolled in your truck. So there is no best technique for High Efficiency Shifting. Same with the bump pay. Yes, a driver is motivated to get off his/her butt to go move a trailer, but in three years of OTR , I got this little tid-bit one time.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Errol makes a good point, but I was actually referring to spending time on researching companies at this point in your career. As far as accessory pay goes, everyone gets it in some form or the other. Once you're established, they throw extra stuff at you all the time. Often for no reason other than your driver manager just really appreciates you making their job so easy.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Old School wrote:

As far as accessory pay goes, everyone gets it in some form or the other. Once you're established, they throw extra stuff at you all the time. Often for no reason other than your driver manager just really appreciates you making their job so easy.

This is soooo true. Emphasis on "getting established"...it can take a while, up to a year. Patience, learn the business, to perform and the money will follow no matter what company you choose.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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