Update On My CDL Training

Topic 27137 | Page 1

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Moe's Comment
member avatar

So, as many of you know I recently failed my fourth backing attempt on Monday. I have made a couple of posts about that, there has been a new development in this that I wanted to post and ask advice about.

I was just informed by a fellow student from my class that our school director informed him that we would be unable to obtain anymore backing/driving instruction until the day before the test date unless we paid approximately 250 per hour to cover his operation costs (fuel, insurance, and instructor compensation).

Is this a normal sort of practice amongst private trucking schools or is this just greed?

I dont want to come across as naive , I did work in banking so I understand costs, but this seems excessive and almost like he is just setting us up to fail, so that he can then write us off his books and be done with us.

If this is the case, I feel really really stupid at this point. I read and read the posts that you all have made about company sponsored training and how much better it is and I kick myself for not heeding that advice.

Here it is , I simply wanted to better myself and now it turns out I have set myself up to fail (i dont have 250 per hour, i barely will have rent for dec and jan).

I need to take time to reflect upon all of this there are some lessons that i need to learn, the first of which is that i SHOULD have listened to my gut when it came to this private school i attended. I had some reservations about it , but I brushed those off.

Now it's too late, I have to start making my plans for the future moving ahead.....

Just thought I would provide an update and ask for any best suggestions about what I can and should do moving forward.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Moe's Comment
member avatar

I dont know if its taboo or a no no to say the name of the school or include a link to their website? Would that in anyway cause trouble for the forum? I don't want to do that if it will.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Moe, we've watched you struggle and we've listened to you vent at times. There's no need to mention the school's name. It makes no difference. It's been a painful experience for you. We get it. Many of us struggled getting started. I had a tough go of it myself.

Now that you see the wisdom of Paid CDL Training Programs, why don't you just focus on getting into one? I think it's the answer to your issues. Seriously, it sounds like all you need is some good "one on one" time at backing and you could get yourself across the finish line. Many of them will pay you during training, which would ease up your financial concerns, and each of them will pair you up with your own personal mentor. There's nothing easy about it, but it would help you get the job done.

I hope you'll consider it.

It's not unusual for a school to charge extra for extra work. As far as what you stated, it's second hand information. The truth is, they can charge what they want. It makes no difference whether we think it's outrageous or not. If you thought 250 dollars (one hour of individual training) would get you what you needed it would probably seem like a bargain in light of getting your career started. Why don't you ask the school about it? Don't just go by what your fellow students say.

We're grateful to you for sharing your experience with us. It's been enlightening for many. I wish you every success.

Keep us posted Moe. We want to celebrate your success. I know you can get it done. You just need to consider what's your best next move.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Is this a normal sort of practice amongst private trucking schools or is this just greed?

It's normal, and it makes sense. It is very expensive to run those schools. They can't lose money to help you succeed. They have to cover their costs.

Paid CDL Training Programs get their investment back when you drive for their company. So if they have to put some extra time and money into a driver, they may eventually get it back. A private school only makes money during the training process, so they can't give the training away. They'll never recoup those costs.

I simply wanted to better myself and now it turns out I have set myself up to fail

Moe, success in life doesn't have a finish line. It's a never-ending process. You only fail if you quit trying. You're in the process of becoming a truck driver. Everyone hits bumps in the road. Trust me, what you're going through is nothing compared with some stories we've heard over the years. You just have to take it a day at a time and do whatever it takes to stay in the game.

I just finished a book called "The Infinite Game" by Simon Sinek. It's about this very thing. You don't approach success as if it's a game you can win or lose. There is no finish line or game clock. There is no end to it. You will have markers along the way, like getting your CDL, but getting it or not doesn't mean you've won or lost, succeeded or failed. It just means you mark that item off your list and keep moving forward.

Have you tried contacting any of the paid training programs? You can Apply For Paid CDL Training right here through our website. One of those companies may take you on and you'll be on your way.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PJ's Comment
member avatar

Moe, Brett and OS are spot on. Private schools have no investment in you. You pay a certain rate for a certain amount of instruction. Any training beyond that costs extra.

At this point in your career you have no idea what it costs per hour to run the school. They have equipment costs, instructor costs, and facility costs. Based on my frame of reference from driver training 250 an hour is very reasonable on their end. I get you are there with limited funds. That is very common for new students. Start applying to company sponsored schools. If you fail your test again just get on a bus to one of those schools.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rubber Duck's Comment
member avatar

What happens if you fail the 5th time? Do you need to wait a year to retest?

ChrisEMT's Comment
member avatar

I am not sure it is greed or not, since like it has been said, it is expensive to run a CDL school. The school I attended, and eventually taught at for a short time, allowed students to practice as much as they needed to, but they did start to charge students the $150 charge that the school had to pay for students to be tested by the DMV inspector on top of the cost that the student needed to pay for the new test form from the DMV.

While I taught we had a student who had finished the 22 week course, and his son had started after him (and he finished the course and got hired byh a major carrier, finished the 275 hours with a trainer, and went solo), and this student was still there trying to pass the test, even though every instructor tried every way to teach him, and break him of his bad habits. The last time I brought him out on the road, I spent 3 hours with him, and he asked for my opinion on if he would pass the test in 4 days. I told him that he should go in, talk to the head instructor, and reschedule the test (so he could practice more, and be closer to 100% ready to pass, as well as save almost $200) for at least 2 weeks and practice every day, do to him grinding gears, not making turns appropriately, coasting, and not stopping at the appropriate times or distances. He ended up not rescheduling, failing the test do to coasting through a solid yellow light, and a few other things. When I saw him afterwards, he came to me and told me he should have taken my advice since it was his 4th time testing, and if he didn't pass the next time he would have to wait a year. I had left dhortly after that due to personal issues needing me at home, and I heard he finally passed 2 months later, after plenty of practice (almost every day) and a good heart to heart talk with his son....

I do believe that my former school, if you fail the 5th time, and have to wait a year, will charge you for a refresher (4 week course) , mainly because of the operating cost, and the fact you may need to start over from scratch.

I would have to agree with others said, and apply to company sponsored training , and try your best and get your license.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Moe's Comment
member avatar

This is basically where I am at except for backing. My drives are passable (I say that with confidence). I am admitting that what I have done up to this point has not worked for me, so I need to approach this at a different angle.

The crucible of fire lol

I am not sure it is greed or not, since like it has been said, it is expensive to run a CDL school. The school I attended, and eventually taught at for a short time, allowed students to practice as much as they needed to, but they did start to charge students the $150 charge that the school had to pay for students to be tested by the DMV inspector on top of the cost that the student needed to pay for the new test form from the DMV.

While I taught we had a student who had finished the 22 week course, and his son had started after him (and he finished the course and got hired byh a major carrier, finished the 275 hours with a trainer, and went solo), and this student was still there trying to pass the test, even though every instructor tried every way to teach him, and break him of his bad habits. The last time I brought him out on the road, I spent 3 hours with him, and he asked for my opinion on if he would pass the test in 4 days. I told him that he should go in, talk to the head instructor, and reschedule the test (so he could practice more, and be closer to 100% ready to pass, as well as save almost $200) for at least 2 weeks and practice every day, do to him grinding gears, not making turns appropriately, coasting, and not stopping at the appropriate times or distances. He ended up not rescheduling, failing the test do to coasting through a solid yellow light, and a few other things. When I saw him afterwards, he came to me and told me he should have taken my advice since it was his 4th time testing, and if he didn't pass the next time he would have to wait a year. I had left dhortly after that due to personal issues needing me at home, and I heard he finally passed 2 months later, after plenty of practice (almost every day) and a good heart to heart talk with his son....

I do believe that my former school, if you fail the 5th time, and have to wait a year, will charge you for a refresher (4 week course) , mainly because of the operating cost, and the fact you may need to start over from scratch.

I would have to agree with others said, and apply to company sponsored training , and try your best and get your license.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Moe's Comment
member avatar

I just spoke to DMV this AM. Should I fail a fifth time, I am then locked out of any class of CDL testing for 1 year within the state of Oregon. This involves Class A, B etc. Any commercial testing.

At this point I really have to make my next moves count and I am going to loom further this week into the paid company training this website has suggested.

It might mean I have to leave Oregon for a little while to train in another state and get licensed there and come back home etc. I dont know yet. The journey continues, at least I have clear facts on the table now and can embrace the suck and move forward.

What happens if you fail the 5th time? Do you need to wait a year to retest?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

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