Survey: Your Biggest Worries And Most Important Questions

Topic 27138 | Page 4

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Sean A.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey Sean, I just realized that "do the right thing" comment may have sounded like I thought you were a lousy Dad. Forgive me, that wasn't my intent. I was really thinking of keeping the big picture in mind on getting your training done. Always think long term when making trucking decisions. You'll be way ahead of the game by sticking with Wil-Trans for your training and rookie year. Honestly, that was my thinking. I just didn't have the time to expand on my thoughts.

Hang in there - and welcome to Texas!

I totally understand, and believe me after 20 years of bad memories in texas im ready to bounce 😂

Wil-Trans:

Darrel Wilson bought his first tractor in 1980 at age 20, but, being too young to meet OTR age requirements, he leased the truck out and hired a driver.

Through growth and acquisition, Wil-Trans now employs over 200 drivers, and has a long-standing partnership with Prime, Inc. to haul their refrigerated freight. The family of businesses also includes Jim Palmer Trucking and O & S Trucking.

Bill R.'s Comment
member avatar

Brett,
Thanks bunches for this great web resource. One of, if not THE best out there (to quote one of my favorite radio characters..."That's my opinion, ought to be yours"..."Mack Truck" 103 WKDF Nashville, back in the day).
I can't really think of anything that hasn't already been mentioned. Looking forward to any new articles.
You guys keep the info coming for us newbies.
Bill R.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Brett,
Thanks bunches for this great web resource. One of, if not THE best out there (to quote one of my favorite radio characters..."That's my opinion, ought to be yours"..."Mack Truck" 103 WKDF Nashville, back in the day).
I can't really think of anything that hasn't already been mentioned. Looking forward to any new articles.
You guys keep the info coming for us newbies.
Bill R.

Mack Truck....WKDF! WOW! I've not heard that name in forever. Thanks for that memory jog, Bill R.

thank-you.gif

Bill R.'s Comment
member avatar

Mack Truck....WKDF! WOW! I've not heard that name in forever. Thanks for that memory jog, Bill R.

thank-you.gif


Yup.
I got to thinking after I posted...mixed up my DJs...Mack Truck was on 98.6 WSIX...Bubba Skynyrd was WKDF....boy I miss those days....rofl-1.gif
Bill

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Appalachained's Comment
member avatar

I have researched quite a bit. I’ve made major life changes in preparation for trucking school. Most of my questions have been answered in this forum. I can pass all sections of the permit test with flying colors. I can handle the life style I’m almost certain. I’m a pretty smart guy at least I would like to think so. The one thing that terrifies me is the fear of failure. The one thing I can’t be sure of is if I can learn to back a truck. I’ve read that some of the smarter people otherwise just can’t get it. It never clicks for them. Anyway my question is what is the success rate in trucking schools. I realize a lot of people drop out for assorted reasons, but I’d like to hear some real numbers on how many people actually fail because they can’t pass the CDL test because of backing and how many chances different trucking companies will give you before they give up on you.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

One of my biggest worries (and still is) would be not finding parking after I'm low on hours, or in an unfamiliar area of the country. As I get more experienced, I find the spots to park and keep notes.

An example is tonight. I was at a delivery all day today! Scheduled to unload at 1100, and just got the paperwork back at 1945. Unreal for a van driver. So now, I consult my notes and know of one of the huge rest stops in Greenfield, Indiana where I'm sure to get a spot tonight. Big day today with about 200 miles driven and 11.5 hours sitting.

Pupil2Prodigy's Comment
member avatar

Being taken advantage of, being accosted outside of my truck by prostitutes, drug users, or violent individuals, sabotage (the pulling of trailer pins or whatever else), undisciplined training/trainers

Jeremy's Comment
member avatar

A lil trick i learned when first starting and not knowing to park was to call local police departments being very respectful and seek advice on a place to park i gained some super sweet very quiet peaceful sleeping spots in the northeast doing so not to mention most of them say ill have night patrol keep an eye out on the area while he is doing his rounds. If theres a will theres a way

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Jeremy's Comment
member avatar

That was my biggest fear though parking within my alotted eld times

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

My single biggest concern then, now, and always will be; involvement in a serious non-preventable accident.

Every one of our senses, and our focus must always have "safety first" above everything else. Constant vigilance, situational awareness, scanning your site lines (forward and side), maintaining a safe speed, stay clear of "mixing-in" at highway speeds, adjustment of the driving approach for inclement weather/terrain, maintaining a safe following distance and anticipating the behavior of other drivers (professional and non) are paramount to long term success and safety. Over time (hopefully), you develop the unteachable "Spidey" sense of an experienced, safety conscience driver Please never, ever lose sight of that and make those elements intrinsic to your every-day operation.

The longer you are out here, the more you will see and experience confirming even if you perform everything right, and don't make any mistakes we must always realize and be aware that there are times "luck" can make or break a situation. Many of us have had or seen near misses; I know I have. I had a conversation many years ago with a 3 million mile "safe driver" with Walmart's Private Fleet. I asked him how he managed to achieve a record like that operating in the NorthEast. He suggested 4 things to me and they have all stuck with me almost 6 years later...

1- Do not drive too fast. 2- Maintain a safe following distance. 3- Use abundant common sense when deciding to run in snow and ice. 4- And Lady-Luck, because the record could end on any given day, through no fault of mine.

Sobering. Those 4 lines are written and laminated inside the cover of my clip-board I use for managing my paperwork and personal information. The first thing I do every day is open the cover, thus I see and read the above never forgetting the conversation I had with the 3-Million Miler.

Safe travels everyone...the holiday season is in full-swing. Expect an increase in bad driving behavior for the next several weeks.

Peace.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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