PackRat's 2020 Daily Driving Diary

Topic 27353 | Page 9

Page 9 of 19 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Turtle's Comment
member avatar

I believe most will require strict adherence to appointment times. The DCs are simply too packed to allow many trucks to try and deliver early.

Give a driver an hour, they'll try for two. Give em two and they'll try for four, etc.

Rookie Doyenne's Comment
member avatar

Turtle wrote:

I believe most will require strict adherence to appointment times. The DCs are simply too packed to allow many trucks to try and deliver early.

Give a driver an hour, they'll try for two. Give em two and they'll try for four, etc.

Is that, "give a top-tier driver....." smile.gif

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

The rules are very different for WMPF and Dedicated a transportation partners assigned to a specific DC. We pull up in the left lane if security in the larger DCs, and are checked-in quickly.

Turtle and I handle primarily outbound loads destined for Walmart or Sams Club. I’m 98% grocery, I believe Turtle handles both grocery and general merchandise DCs. We have a delivery window for each destination that is fairly liberal in most cases and not nearly as strict for inbound DC loads handled by outside carriers.

20% of the time I’ll have some sort of vendor backhaul that is considered inbound. The window for this is also a range and again not as strict as inbound loads handled by outside carriers or contractors.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I'll post the Friday update tomorrow. I'm fairly disgusted right now with the final day of the workweek here. Actually, just about the entire week.

Pete E Pothole's Comment
member avatar

Reading along, thanks for sharing. That last trailer I couldn't have done much about but i keep nuts bolts and a couple spare mudflaps in my truck just in case i grab one that has been ripped off. As long as that piece of steel is there to pinch the flap i'm good to go. As I said though with the way that bracket is bent nothing you could really do there.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Reading along, thanks for sharing. That last trailer I couldn't have done much about but i keep nuts bolts and a couple spare mudflaps in my truck just in case i grab one that has been ripped off. As long as that piece of steel is there to pinch the flap i'm good to go. As I said though with the way that bracket is bent nothing you could really do there.

I have five spare mud flaps stored under my mattress, and a large Folgers can full of used hardware: nuts, bolts, washers, clips, etc. I carry a 40 ton jack, and 500 lbs of assorted tools and spare parts, so not much I can't repair.

If the other driver had not lied on his trailer post trip inspection (All good/No defects?), or had reported it, after the fact, I would have been fine. If the company would start addressing this problem with some sort of penalty for these jerks, I would have been fine. If I was paid more than $12 an hour when I have to waste my time going to a repair shop to fix what these jerks leave behind for the next guy, I would be fine. If it had not happened two relay trailers in a row, I would have been fine. If it had not been 28 degrees, with sleet and snow falling sideways at the muddy drop lot, I would have been fine.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

24 January 2020

I woke up around 0300 at the drop lot, then walked around to locate that next relay trailer. Once located, I hooked up, then did a thorough pre trip inspection with fingers crossed. After finding everything road worthy for a change, I submitted all the required messages and started this roll towards Kansas City. KS.

I decided to do a Split Sleeper break along the way to maximize my time after the delivery. After driving about five hours, I parked for the next eight hours. Afterwards, I drove the remaining 35 miles to the Sam's Club DC, arriving at 1740 for the 1830 unloading appointment. A tight place where drivers are required to drop their trailer in the dock, disconnect. then return bobtail to a waiting area. The wait in Sleeper Berth got me my necessary two additional hours, completing my break. I did my break this way because with a straight 10 hour break, I would have been too early at the consignee. For this trip, I felt my choice worked best.

It was all for naught, because no loads from dispatch after this delivery. Again. I've felt for the past two months that they should just shut down every day after 1700, because nothing happens positive after dark. I drove to a Transport America terminal we can utilize in Kansas City, MO to begin my required nightly sitting period. Time for another unnecessary Off Duty, not rolling, not making money period. Morale is running low.

For Friday, I drove 295 miles in 5.0 hours, using 0.7 hours On Duty, totaling 5.7 hours.

Continued.....

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

25 January 2020

Saturday morning I woke up around 0700, and sent a message in, inquiring about any loads. No response. Finally at 1030, I get dispatched to drive deadhead (empty trailer) 241 miles to pick up a preloaded trailer at Pella Windows, on Pella Corporation Drive, in Pella, Iowa. Sounds a bit repetitious to me....It was actually 212 miles because it was calculated from my last delivery in KC, Kansas.

I arrived at 1550 to a deserted business. All the paperwork was in the open guard house, along with their instructions to follow for weekends. Easy stuff, but not very secure. Makes me wonder if there are any cargo thefts here? Would not be difficult to pull off.

Dropped my empty after eventually locating the only empty hole in their drop lot. This took some precision backing with the foot of snow and ice on the lot. I located my loaded trailer, hooked up, pre trip, compared the BOL details, seal numbers, etc. All good, so I decided to move from there to a different lot with no snow to adjust the tandems as needed. While creeping out, I pay close attention to the trailer tires. These have a tendency to freeze up in cold weather, especially if the trailer has been sitting for extended periods. No issues with this one.

*NOTE* It's always easiest to adjust the trailer tandems on dry, level ground. Snow, dirt, or muddy lots are the worst places to try, and you're apt to just waste time sliding the tires. Cold weather may add to the difficulty, as the carriage pins may be frozen in place, refusing to budge. Sometimes it can take longer, especially with the heavier loads.

After adjusting, I parked to check my routing- company directions, GPS, Google Maps, and my atlas. I have 270 miles driving on side roads before I reach an Interstate in Missouri, and I've already used 4.3 hours on my Driving/On Duty clock. It's now 1645, so if I go six more hours, it will be very late looking for parking. I decide to sit here where I already have guaranteed parking. It has me 865 miles from the delivery in Norcross. GA on Tuesday at 0830, so plenty of time to make it for the unload.

Today was 212 miles driving in 3.8 hours, using 0.5 hours On Duty, for 4.3 hours total.

0658198001580025757.jpg

The drive on Iowa Route 14 today.

0306554001580025842.jpg

Hannah loaded and ready to go.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

26 January 2020

After finishing my break at the shipper in/at/on Pella (in case you forget where you are), I starting heading the 865 miles southeast to the delivery.

We drove to the Gateway Pilot truck stop in East St. Louis, IL and parked at 1130. I had texted Rob to see if he wanted to meet again, and surprisingly he agreed. So he arrives in his Chevy, and we head into St. Louis for lunch, some quick touring driving and on foot near the famous Gateway Arch at the banks of the Mississippi River, and a trip to a local supermarket.

I didn't get any pictures inside, but this was a great Cajun/New Orleans themed restaurant, a short walk from Busch Stadium, where the Cardinals play. He even picked up the lunch check, so thanks Rob! A really cool mural painted outside the place. Excellent food! I'll be back!

0784644001580131889.jpg

Back to the truck afterwards for some actual rest. I got back onto the Interstate around 2145. No snow, or wind, but just some patchy fog to be alert for, along with random construction zones with reduced speeds. After about an hour, I started hearing a slight air leak inside the cab, coming from the brake valves, but was not losing any pressure on my dashboard gauges. I stopped on an off ramp to investigate this further, troubleshooting to narrow down the problem.

I first heard the noise with both valves in, so I tried it with only the trailer brakes applied (red knob out)--I still hear the air hiss. I then applied the tractor brakes (yellow knob out), and the hissing air stopped. I now know it's the tractor with an air leak; not the trailer. After getting out and walking to the passenger side (where I can really hear the air escaping the loudest), I determined it was the front rear axle brake canister beginning to fail. I say beginning because remember: it's maintaining pressure, the brakes aren't smoking, and no odors. If these are in full failure mode, the air system (compressor) will not produce enough output pressure to keep up, the pressure will rapidly drop below 65 PSI, triggering the in cab warning alarm. At around 40 PSI, the emergency mode activates the brakes on it's own, and it's All Systems Full Stop Right NOW! You ain't goin' anywhere then. Period!

I called our Breakdown Line (5th time this month?), and explain the problem and where I plan to drive for repairs. My idea is to head another 50 miles to the TA truck stop in Mount Vernon, IL. I message night dispatch to alert them, too.

I make it to the TA luckily, and check in at 2323. "We only have one technician, and he's on a road call...." FANTASTIC! I will wait for the mechanic, because I don't have a spare brake canister on the truck with me tonight.

So for Sunday, driving was 385 miles in 6.5 hours, using 0.4 hours On Duty, totaling 6.9 hours.

Is the technician returning soon? Did I diagnose the problem correctly? Will they have the parts to fix it?

Cliffhanger until tomorrow!

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Old School's Comment
member avatar

PackRat, I did a few diaries about my life on the road awhile back. People enjoy reading this stuff - thanks for putting in the effort!

By the way, I'm bound for Pella myself. We have a regular customer there right across the street from where you went. I have one stop in Muscatine, IA tonight, then I'll be in Pella for my 0700 appointment tomorrow morning.

Page 9 of 19 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More