Seeking Solo Otr

Topic 27366 | Page 3

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Old School's Comment
member avatar

I'm gonna give it one more shot. Though I'm not sure why.

You're making all the classic mistakes. You want to convert mileage pay into hourly pay. That's silly. There's really no way to compare the two. You do not understand "performance based pay."

18.50 is hardly even decent pay in itself.

You are honestly the only person I know who has the gumption to make such a claim! You seem to consider yourself highly valuable. Let me teach you a very important lesson in economics. You are only worth what someone who needs you is willing to pay you. That's your market value. The beauty of trucking is that your employer allows you to prove your worth by your performance. You just don't know how to improve your value.

Look at your statement...

You aren’t going to convince me that I need to improve my performance because the majority of time I am waiting for loads. Dealing with other people’s bull**** and I don’t get paid for any of it.

When I was earning 27 CPM I would hear other drivers at the company who said the same nonsense you're claiming. I never found myself waiting for loads. I was pre-planned ahead of time on almost each dispatch. Why do you think that would be?

I'm gonna help you with the answer...

It was my performance. I had built an awesome relationship with my dispatcher. I communicated very effectively with him. I had established a track record of always being ahead of schedule. Because I focused on my performance, he developed a trust in me. If I sent him an email, the morning he dispatched me 2,000 miles, telling him exactly what time I'd be available, he knew I would make it happen. Therefore he could keep me moving. They can't do that until you prove your worth.

You haven't even been out here long enough to establish anything but an attitude. You need to back off your approach and recognize the sound advice we're giving. Quit blaming your company, your dispatcher , your pay rate or anything else outside of yourself. One good look in the mirror and you'll find the culprit. Aha, hear me now... You'll also find the solution! You can be a really great driver who is making great money. You've just got to recognize the problem. We've been trying to help, but you're stuck - you're convinced you know what's wrong.

Between me and you - which one of us is doing really well out here? I'm not trying to boast. I'm wanting you to think clearly. I know you're capable, but you still aren't doing so. I started at a lower rate than you. I never once considered it too cheap. I measured out what I was worth by demonstrating it. You have got to produce some evidence that shows your value. That comes from your performance not your pie hole.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I totally agree with Old School ad Brett.

I’ll also add this...

Name 1 job that is BS free. Name 1 that pays extra money for dealing with it. Name 1... Please, enlighten me, and realize I’ve worked since age 14, I’ll be 61 this year...I’ve experienced a whole heckuva lot in my lifetime, but never a job that was void of BS at any level of pay.

Second; agreed there is a lot of waiting in an OTR job. It’s a given and must be expected. Embrace it or fight it... That said, if you approach the people that you interact with on a daily basis with the same attitude projected here? It’s no wonder you are having issues. Think about it...you might be your own worst enemy.

You need to exercise basic people skills out here to get things done; with customers, mechanics, law enforcement and your support team,...period. No substitute.

The other element is patience. You cannot learn to be a top producer in a day, a week or even a month. It’s a long-legged process that honestly never really ends, but at the 1 Year point you should begin reaping the rewards of consistent safe and efficient operation.

Here is what is going to happen here...keep arguing, talking smack and no one worth a damn will bother with you. We can help you but you must be willing to open up your mind a bit and turn your focus inward. You will have the same issue no matter where you go at this point.

Otherwise...McDonald’s awaits. Up to you Chief...up to you.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Concept's Comment
member avatar

You are an idiot. You probably aren’t even a driver. I have a good relationship with my dispatch but guess what? I’m still waiting on the customer. It doesn’t matter what my dispatch does. I have driven my maximum number of hours in a week and guess what the pay was still trash. Why would I not calculate my hourly wage to see if I am making good money for my time? Nothing you say sounds like anything but “I’m a stupid tool”. Anyways I have a company that’s 30 miles from my home that has a dedicated route paying 56 per mile and pays for stops. They said I need one more months of training there and they will pay me 165 a day for that. I’ll be home every week. Thanks for nothing

I'm gonna give it one more shot. Though I'm not sure why.

You're making all the classic mistakes. You want to convert mileage pay into hourly pay. That's silly. There's really no way to compare the two. You do not understand "performance based pay."

double-quotes-start.png

18.50 is hardly even decent pay in itself.

double-quotes-end.png

You are honestly the only person I know who has the gumption to make such a claim! You seem to consider yourself highly valuable. Let me teach you a very important lesson in economics. You are only worth what someone who needs you is willing to pay you. That's your market value. The beauty of trucking is that your employer allows you to prove your worth by your performance. You just don't know how to improve your value.

Look at your statement...

double-quotes-start.png

You aren’t going to convince me that I need to improve my performance because the majority of time I am waiting for loads. Dealing with other people’s bull**** and I don’t get paid for any of it.

double-quotes-end.png

When I was earning 27 CPM I would hear other drivers at the company who said the same nonsense you're claiming. I never found myself waiting for loads. I was pre-planned ahead of time on almost each dispatch. Why do you think that would be?

I'm gonna help you with the answer...

It was my performance. I had built an awesome relationship with my dispatcher. I communicated very effectively with him. I had established a track record of always being ahead of schedule. Because I focused on my performance, he developed a trust in me. If I sent him an email, the morning he dispatched me 2,000 miles, telling him exactly what time I'd be available, he knew I would make it happen. Therefore he could keep me moving. They can't do that until you prove your worth.

You haven't even been out here long enough to establish anything but an attitude. You need to back off your approach and recognize the sound advice we're giving. Quit blaming your company, your dispatcher , your pay rate or anything else outside of yourself. One good look in the mirror and you'll find the culprit. Aha, hear me now... You'll also find the solution! You can be a really great driver who is making great money. You've just got to recognize the problem. We've been trying to help, but you're stuck - you're convinced you know what's wrong.

Between me and you - which one of us is doing really well out here? I'm not trying to boast. I'm wanting you to think clearly. I know you're capable, but you still aren't doing so. I started at a lower rate than you. I never once considered it too cheap. I measured out what I was worth by demonstrating it. You have got to produce some evidence that shows your value. That comes from your performance not your pie hole.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Thanks for nothing

You're welcome!

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

...all this coming from a driver with 2 months of experience.

For those of us committed to a Dedicated operation, especially retail, our friend is in for a rude awakening unless he seriously adjusts his attitude.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Delco Dave's Comment
member avatar

shocked.png

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Please keep us updated to just how wrong we are. You very well may find that your CPM is higher but you'll be turning less miles. It's possible you'll make more money, but it's also possible they'll get rid of you if you have any minor incidents.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Moe's Comment
member avatar

Holy Moly, we really DO need a popcorn emote for the drama I just thumbed through OP, I wish you the best of luck in anything you do, with that level of arrogance , ego and pride, Karma is just waiting around the corner.wtf.gifshocked.pnggood-luck.gif

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

WOW!

shocked.pngwtf.gif

SRJ's Comment
member avatar

First I will start by saying “I AM NOT CURRENTLY A CDL DRIVER”, but have been following the site and preparing for a possible career in trucking.

Your initial question, “Are there any company’s that would hire me and pay me decent as a solo driver? Willing to relocate from California.”, seems to already been answered, by yourself, as you state, “Anyways I have a company that’s 30 miles from my home that has a dedicated route paying 56 per mile and pays for stops.” I therefore question your intent on your initial post. You asked the question, that you already had answered, received valuable and honest feedback from experienced drivers, only to insult them. If you can’t truly see where the problem exists here, you have a long road ahead of you.

I’ve spent many years supervising, managing, and leading individuals in different fields of work. You are the classic example of the one I would tell the following. “If I could pay you a $100,000 a year for your job, YOU still wouldn’t be happy.” YOU are truly the only person that can make yourself happy. Based on your comments, I feel you are a truly unhappy person.

With 3 months of CDL driving experience, I truly hope your .56, regional , home on weekends new gig makes you happy. Truly I do as this world is such a better place with happy people.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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