Well This Sucks :( Sent Home From Prime

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Harvest's Comment
member avatar

Hey everyone, I was recently attending orientation at Prime inc as a rehire. Everything was going great and I had a TNT trainer set up to go on the road with. My recruiter said I was cleared and just waiting on my driver code. Well this last Thursday I ran into a issue. My last employer was a local small landscaping company where I drove a class B dump truck. I enjoyed the job but I had issues with the distance plus lack of training on heavy equipment they wanted me to operate. I left without putting in a 2 week notice so I could go back to Prime and go OTR. I know that was very unprofessional of me, I returned all company equipment and picked up my last check. On what I think is my DAC report, they marked "no" under "Would rehire" And they claimed that I damaged one of there tarps. I honestly don't think I damaged any tarp while I was working there so I was rather confused about that. Prime said that they couldn't hire me since I damaged equipment at my last job. They said I could be rehired with 60 day's experience driving a CMV at another company. So here I am back home, still very disappointed at myself and the entire situation, I loved Prime as a company. And will hopefully return someday. I have been looking at other companies now that are close by me. I am hoping to get hired at Western express, they are even closer to me than Prime was and has home weekly routes if I wanted. I am trying to look on the bright side, maybe this will be good for me to get some dry van experience before going back to Prime for tanker.

Also, do you guy's know any decent companies that would hired a rookie driver that's based around the Northeast? Drivable from Delaware specifically.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

JuiceBox's Comment
member avatar

Melton truck lines would

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Harvest, if you didn't damage any equipment, I would consider calling your last employer and having a professional conversation. Start by apologizing for leaving without giving notice and thank them for the opportunity. Be kind and polite. Then ask if they'll remove that statement from the report. Regardless of the outcome, move forward.

You can Apply For Paid CDL Training right here on our website to some great companies. You can apply to others outside of our system directly. These are all fantastic companies, so take a shot and see where that leads.

It also makes no difference where a company is located. Forget about that. As long as they hire from your area you're good to go.

They said I could be rehired with 60 day's experience driving a CMV at another company

Forget you ever heard that. When you land a job, give them everything you've got for a minimum of one year. After one year your career will be on solid footing, you'll understand the industry much better, and then you can make a move if you really want to but chances are you won't want to. Once a person gets a great reputation, builds strong relationships, and understands how their company operates they're making excellent money and they're happy right where they are.

It's not about the company you work for. It's about your performance, your ambition, and the relationships you build within your company.

Listen, apply like crazy to other programs and move on. That's all. Don't sweat the past. What's done is done. Plenty of companies will give you an opportunity.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Harvest's Comment
member avatar

Harvest, if you didn't damage any equipment, I would consider calling your last employer and having a professional conversation. Start by apologizing for leaving without giving notice and thank them for the opportunity. Be kind and polite. Then ask if they'll remove that statement from the report. Regardless of the outcome, move forward.

You can Apply For Paid CDL Training right here on our website to some great companies. You can apply to others outside of our system directly. These are all fantastic companies, so take a shot and see where that leads.

It also makes no difference where a company is located. Forget about that. As long as they hire from your area you're good to go.

double-quotes-start.png

They said I could be rehired with 60 day's experience driving a CMV at another company

double-quotes-end.png

Forget you ever heard that. When you land a job, give them everything you've got for a minimum of one year. After one year your career will be on solid footing, you'll understand the industry much better, and then you can make a move if you really want to but chances are you won't want to. Once a person gets a great reputation, builds strong relationships, and understands how their company operates they're making excellent money and they're happy right where they are.

It's not about the company you work for. It's about your performance, your ambition, and the relationships you build within your company.

Listen, apply like crazy to other programs and move on. That's all. Don't sweat the past. What's done is done. Plenty of companies will give you an opportunity.

Thank you very much for the advice, I will try to give them a call tomorrow. And how does hometime usually work if the terminal is far away? Do most companies let you bring the truck home? Also, any idea if I will still have to pay Prime back for my CDL training? If I do it shouldn't be a huge deal since allot of companies claim to have tuition reimbursement if you drive with them for a year it seems.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Old School's Comment
member avatar
And how does hometime usually work if the terminal is far away? Do most companies let you bring the truck home?

I've never lived near my terminal. I live in Texas. When I was with Western Express my terminal was in Nashville, TN. Now that I'm driving for Knight, my terminal is in Gulfport. MS. Have you noticed how these OTR companies have what they call "hiring areas?" Those are areas of the country they are hauling freight to. Their hiring areas may not even be close to a terminal. When you want to go home they find you some freight that goes near your home. After you've delivered it you'll take the truck home and enjoy done time off.

Some of us are fortunate enough to be able to park at our homes. Others will usually find a nearby truck stop or a large store or place of business that allows them parking privileges while they are at home.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Sorry to hear of this latest setback, Harvest. Sigh, if you had only finished out your TNT...

It's time now to reach within yourself and find that resolve you need to commit to a company. Someone will pick you up. And when they do, stick with it and see it through. Good luck, pal.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Harvest's Comment
member avatar

Sorry to hear of this latest setback, Harvest. Sigh, if you had only finished out your TNT...

It's time now to reach within yourself and find that resolve you need to commit to a company. Someone will pick you up. And when they do, stick with it and see it through. Good luck, pal.

I'm still kicking myself in the butt over it, it truly was a mistake to quit. I was very excited and was going to force myself through it no matter what this time. I would spend any free time I had on the simulators running backing scenario after backing scenario. I hope to find a company within the next week or so. A flatbed company called me and said they were interested and they pay pretty well. But you know how I am about climbing on those loads like the shingles haha.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Harvest's Comment
member avatar

Just a quick update, I am leaving this Tuesday for orientation at Western Express. I am a little nervous because I see allot of negative reviews online for this company. Does anyone here have experience with them? The pay for training and solo is quite a bit lower than Prime, which is a bummer but I am still excited. Beggars can't be choosers! My recruiter said I have to do 150 hours with a trainer as a team before I go solo. This makes me a bit nervous because that seems like it is very quick! Don't get me wrong, I don't like team driving, but I want to make sure I know what I need to before going solo.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Old School started there and was a success.

You know which is a better source of info about trucking companies:

A. Online reviews

B. Bathroom stall walls

C. Trucking Truth

???

Turtle Protege (formerly 's Comment
member avatar

Old School started there and was a success.

You know which is a better source of info about trucking companies:

A. Online reviews

B. Bathroom stall walls

C. Trucking Truth

???

You forget, THE authoritative source for trucking company reviews: YouTube.

In fact, I have found the most helpful videos have the title [company name] Why I Quit! And the number of exclamation marks after the word "quit" tells you the accuracy of the driver's experience.

[Poster self editorial note: In case you cannot tell, the above is sarcasm]

Harvest, my two cents:

I am leaving this Tuesday for orientation at Western Express.

You have already committed and you're going! You have already read some negative reviews and you are psyching yourself out about having negative experience. Maybe someone on the forum can tell you what to expect as far as their procedures. That information might help you navigate the process, but in the end isn't it going to depend on your attitude and desire to complete the training and get your own truck?

Prime is behind you. Whatever, you coulda, shoulda, woulda done at Prime is over. You can't change it, but you can learn from that experience. Put your head down and make it happen. I for one would relish hearing your update that says "finished training and just waiting on my truck."

Good luck and keep us in the loop.

good-luck.gif

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