(NEED ADVICE) Local Feed & Ingredient Haulers

Topic 27726 | Page 1

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Where am i's Comment
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I am new to truck driving. I have had 4 months of over the road flatbed hauling (coils, flat steel, drywall, truck beds, etc). Looking for a home every night job and found a place that hauls feed to bins, ingredients to Mills, and liquid manure in the winter and fall (I have my tanker endorsement). Sounds like a decent gig, they have day cabs but would like to know what I could realistically ask for pay. Pay is hourly and there is no overtime. Was thinking about asking $19/ hr at least since there is no ot but I'm not sure where I would stand given my lack of experience. Located in Iowa.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Rob T.'s Comment
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We highly recommend you stay with your first company for a year so more doors open up. Where in Iowa are you located? I'm in west des moines. That will play a role in what jobs pay. For instance, a driver living in a rinky dink town of 100 people will pay less than a job in Des Moines. 19 an hr with no OT sounds really low unless you live in the middle of no where.

Where am i's Comment
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I'm over in Mt pleasant, but the place I'm looking into is in washington.

PJ's Comment
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I don’t know your area, but we have 2 companies here in northeast Georgia that haul feed to turkey/chicken farms. The spaces are usually very tight and non paved. This type of confined space manuerving can be difficult, espically in the dark. With only 4 months experience that will be a huge challenge.

Rob T.'s Comment
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That seems a little low but unfortunately washington isn't exactly a big city. Any idea how many hours a week you would get? If you're only going to make 19 an hour and work 40 hours a week that's only 39k a year. Is there a possibility to transfer to another division at your current company that would get you home more frequently? We have a few members here that drive for Walmart or an outside carrier doing dedicated deliveries for them. Have you looked into that in mt pleasant? I believe Schneider does it for that DC.

Rob T.'s Comment
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Have they said if this job pays hourly? I've heard of jobs similiar to this paying mileage/stop or by the ton. Also how much physical work is involved? Do you strictly drive or are you responsible for unloading as well?

Where am i's Comment
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I know for sure pay is by the hour but I'm not sure how many hours/week. I am currently out of a job. (The previous company I was working for, my elogs were messed up and my trucks GPS wasn't kicking on to tell it I was driving at times. Unfortunately I was naive and didn't look at it closely and let company know before I was pulled into a scale and dot did a random check on my elogs. They put it down as false logs and I got a ticket, which I paid, but my company let me go when I got back to the terminal). So sticking with the company is not an option. As far as the Walmart and Schneider goes, I had no knowledge about them. May have to do some research. I really wouldn't mind staying out in the truck a night at a time, but the pay for staying out a week at a time just wasn't enough (in my personal opinion).

Elog:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Elogs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Joseph I.'s Comment
member avatar

Running feed truck and hauling manure in the winter sounds like working for a hog or chicken producer. You will deal with mud and frost boils on gravel all spring I believe. Maybe in Washington you are far enough south that that is not as much of a problem. It will pay better than that but you will work for and earn it. A lot more and harder work than OTR but there are some really good companies and some bad ones. You want to mention them or not, I might have some more info depending on the company.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Where am i's Comment
member avatar

The company is called Vittetoe Pork (JWV Pork). Also seen Eichelberger farms in Wayland is looking for a feed delivery truck driver.

Amish country's Comment
member avatar

I deliver to feed mills daily. Some have tons of space and others make you question the engineering. Couldn't make out exactly what type of trailer you would be using (pnematic tank, open top dump, feed tank with with boom arm).

3/4 of the ones I go to are dirt lots in the middle of nowhere using 2 lane roads to access.

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