Howdy Folks And Here's What Troubles Me About COVID 19

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Anne A. (G13MomCat)'s Comment
member avatar

J.W. Dover replies:

"Anne, I've been buying Crystal Geyser in 1-gallon jugs for years now. I was raised on store-bought spring water from birth. Well water is nasty. Tap water is hard, full of chemicals. I would not survive without spring water."

We actually have 'quite' the filtration/purifying system for our well water; which does come from local 'springs' .. and it's free, fluoride free, and germ/chemical free. We prefer it over bottled water, and it's lighter. Yes, it is.

Re: the 'foodstuffs...' When my husband was OTR (and he was for about 6 years) I would cook, tupperware up, and freeze many a meal for him. He had a fridge and a microwave; he's not the cooking type. It worked well; and of course he would have 'canned goods' ie: Dinty Moore or whatnot, for backup should problems (as they tend to out there) arise.

Restauranting on the road is great, yet pricey. If you've kept up with the news as of late, most restaurants are CLOSED for dine in; takeout only. It's all over the 'trucking' news channels...and I've posted links elsewhere (just click on my name/avatar and it'll show you all my posts.)

Wish you well on this journey, once again!!!

Anne :)

ps: You wouldn't have a brother, cousin, or uncle named Todd, would you?! (<<< He's heavy into wheelbarrows as well, and hails from the PNW..! He has a cousin named Tom C., if that rings a bell.)

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Bird-one's Comment
member avatar

Yeah To be honest. I haven't seen a huge shOrtage on the roaD either. But than again ive being kinD of fasting lately anyways. Trying some new diets. Always keep a case of water with me. And that is an awesome story Anne. Thanks for sharing that. Like PJ said walking the walk there.

J.W.Dover's Comment
member avatar

J.W. Dover replies:

"Anne, I've been buying Crystal Geyser in 1-gallon jugs for years now. I was raised on store-bought spring water from birth. Well water is nasty. Tap water is hard, full of chemicals. I would not survive without spring water."

We actually have 'quite' the filtration/purifying system for our well water; which does come from local 'springs' .. and it's free, fluoride free, and germ/chemical free. We prefer it over bottled water, and it's lighter. Yes, it is.

Re: the 'foodstuffs...' When my husband was OTR (and he was for about 6 years) I would cook, tupperware up, and freeze many a meal for him. He had a fridge and a microwave; he's not the cooking type. It worked well; and of course he would have 'canned goods' ie: Dinty Moore or whatnot, for backup should problems (as they tend to out there) arise.

Restauranting on the road is great, yet pricey. If you've kept up with the news as of late, most restaurants are CLOSED for dine in; takeout only. It's all over the 'trucking' news channels...and I've posted links elsewhere (just click on my name/avatar and it'll show you all my posts.)

Wish you well on this journey, once again!!!

Anne :)

ps: You wouldn't have a brother, cousin, or uncle named Todd, would you?! (<<< He's heavy into wheelbarrows as well, and hails from the PNW..! He has a cousin named Tom C., if that rings a bell.)

No, Anne, nobody in my family woodpile with such names as above. My brother's name is Sam. I have a cousin named Wilbur. My maternal great uncle was Tom O. The wheelbarrow reminds me of crisis times like our current COVID opredeal. It makes me envision post-WWI Germany when people there had to carry a barrow-full of marks to the store for a loaf of bread. There doesn't seem to be a gasoline shortage though so I guess I won't need the wheelbarrow to go to Walmart to haul groceries home. Gas prices now are uncommonly low across the nation considering these times. We can all thank Uncle Don for "Drill, Baby, Drill!"

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Anne A. (G13MomCat)'s Comment
member avatar

Yeah To be honest. I haven't seen a huge shOrtage on the roaD either. But than again ive being kinD of fasting lately anyways. Trying some new diets. Always keep a case of water with me. And that is an awesome story Anne. Thanks for sharing that. Like PJ said walking the walk there.

Bird One, you are most welcome. I'm making it my mission to SHARE that around our municipalities / counties / etc . . . within Ohio. It's sincere...and heartwarming all at once. AND APPRECIATED in times like this, for sure!

Glad you enjoyed it~! Please share... ! ... if enough folks do.. you never know; this could be a trendsetter! good-luck-2.gif

And yeppers; even though my other half is in a daycab these days, he's got a cooler, stocked, just in case....one never knows~! We've been trying to eat healthy, anyway...so it all fits together, nicely.

Diet?!? Do you have one that is even 'moderately' successful? Going through hormonal changes 'late in life' is taking its toll on this ole' gal...and no, I am not getting a Peloton, haha! (Not at THOSE prices, ya know?)

Best to you and yours!!

Anne :)

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Anne A. (G13MomCat)'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

J.W. Dover replies:

"Anne, I've been buying Crystal Geyser in 1-gallon jugs for years now. I was raised on store-bought spring water from birth. Well water is nasty. Tap water is hard, full of chemicals. I would not survive without spring water."

We actually have 'quite' the filtration/purifying system for our well water; which does come from local 'springs' .. and it's free, fluoride free, and germ/chemical free. We prefer it over bottled water, and it's lighter. Yes, it is.

Re: the 'foodstuffs...' When my husband was OTR (and he was for about 6 years) I would cook, tupperware up, and freeze many a meal for him. He had a fridge and a microwave; he's not the cooking type. It worked well; and of course he would have 'canned goods' ie: Dinty Moore or whatnot, for backup should problems (as they tend to out there) arise.

Restauranting on the road is great, yet pricey. If you've kept up with the news as of late, most restaurants are CLOSED for dine in; takeout only. It's all over the 'trucking' news channels...and I've posted links elsewhere (just click on my name/avatar and it'll show you all my posts.)

Wish you well on this journey, once again!!!

Anne :)

ps: You wouldn't have a brother, cousin, or uncle named Todd, would you?! (<<< He's heavy into wheelbarrows as well, and hails from the PNW..! He has a cousin named Tom C., if that rings a bell.)

double-quotes-end.png

No, Anne, nobody in my family woodpile with such names as above. My brother's name is Sam. I have a cousin named Wilbur. My maternal great uncle was Tom O. The wheelbarrow reminds me of crisis times like our current COVID opredeal. It makes me envision post-WWI Germany when people there had to carry a barrow-full of marks to the store for a loaf of bread. There doesn't seem to be a gasoline shortage though so I guess I won't need the wheelbarrow to go to Walmart to haul groceries home. Gas prices now are uncommonly low across the nation considering these times. We can all thank Uncle Don for "Drill, Baby, Drill!"

Sorry, then! Apologies. The similarities are/were uncanny! Follow your dream(s,) drink your spring water, and let us know what your plans are, to join these FINE people of the road~!

Thanks, be safe!

Anne :)

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Viking's Comment
member avatar

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Personally I keep well over a week's worth of food/water on the truck at all times. Do all my cooking in the truck.

And that's before this craziness..

As for miles, they haven't changed, still 2500 - 3300 a week, but I have been hauling more hazmat then usual. Hazmat bonuses are nice! smile.gif

double-quotes-end.png

Cooking on the truck might seem hard unless you are just popping frozen goods in the 'wave. I can also see making cold sandwiches out of an ice chest. There seems to be limited space and no kitchen sink with running hot water, no stovetop, no barbecue grill, no range oven, no chest freezer, no cupboards and no dishwasher. I'm a germ freak. A truck is not a train, RV, yacht or a ship for living spaciousness. My impression was that drivers mostly ate in hearty hot SQUARE meals in restaurants, cafes and diners along the way with pretty waitresses' pouring coffee. Think "Mel's Diner" on the TV show ALICE from the '70's.

Limited space? Sure is.

No sink? Nope

No running water? Bottled water isn't just for drinking.

No stove, oven, grill, freezer chest? Sure there are, just have to supply your own that's either 12v or your inverter can run.

Cupboards? Plenty of cabinets and other creative storage solutions.

Dishwasher? Nope. Two options here. Bring your own and handwash in sinks at truckstops. ( No thanks) or use disposable silverware plates bowls.

I can supply myself with food for a week for 50 - 75$ at Walmart. Or.. I can spend about 20$ per meal at a sit down restaurant in a truck stop... assuming your not sleeping at a shipper/receiver/rest area. Which one makes more financial sense?

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

J.W.Dover's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Personally I keep well over a week's worth of food/water on the truck at all times. Do all my cooking in the truck.

And that's before this craziness..

As for miles, they haven't changed, still 2500 - 3300 a week, but I have been hauling more hazmat then usual. Hazmat bonuses are nice! smile.gif

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Cooking on the truck might seem hard unless you are just popping frozen goods in the 'wave. I can also see making cold sandwiches out of an ice chest. There seems to be limited space and no kitchen sink with running hot water, no stovetop, no barbecue grill, no range oven, no chest freezer, no cupboards and no dishwasher. I'm a germ freak. A truck is not a train, RV, yacht or a ship for living spaciousness. My impression was that drivers mostly ate in hearty hot SQUARE meals in restaurants, cafes and diners along the way with pretty waitresses' pouring coffee. Think "Mel's Diner" on the TV show ALICE from the '70's.

double-quotes-end.png

Limited space? Sure is.

No sink? Nope

No running water? Bottled water isn't just for drinking.

No stove, oven, grill, freezer chest? Sure there are, just have to supply your own that's either 12v or your inverter can run.

Cupboards? Plenty of cabinets and other creative storage solutions.

Dishwasher? Nope. Two options here. Bring your own and handwash in sinks at truckstops. ( No thanks) or use disposable silverware plates bowls.

I can supply myself with food for a week for 50 - 75$ at Walmart. Or.. I can spend about 20$ per meal at a sit down restaurant in a truck stop... assuming your not sleeping at a shipper/receiver/rest area. Which one makes more financial sense?

Probably a lot of frozen foods, TV dinners, etc, that can be nuked and disposable eating-ware. Cold sandwich-making materials. Can drivers get good tender lean roast beef, cheese and fresh breads/French rolls for sandwiches along the way? Delicatessen is pretty hearty and convenient on the go. Salami and cheeses. One can buy throw-away bowls for cold cereals. There's throw away cups too. There used to be a time when drivers could get all-they-could eat ham and eggs at truck stops for about $2.00. An old barber of mine told me that years ago. I can get a full meal at a Perkins for $14.00 including tax and tip. A driver trying to save money then might do a sit-down dinner or lunch every three days over the road as a treat. I would think Per Diem helps with most food expenses on the road. Lets' face it: a truck, ladies and gentlemen of the white line fever, is a not a mobile mess hall. It would kinda be nice if company terminals had sit-down dining facilities for drivers all over the nation like army mess halls. Logging camps for lumberjacks have mobile/field mess kitchens. Truck drivers are kinda "living in the field" (in army parlance) by they are constantly jumping.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

Moe's Comment
member avatar

Seeing all these positive posts about Corona from you guys makes me wish I had really passed that OR exam and was out on the road. Still out of work and the paint company has slowed down due to the pandemic. I am really beginning to wonder if the fates arent against me going right now, as it is I'll have to dip into my retirement yet again to pay Bill's this coming month and Portland is going into lockdown as early as Monday, the writing is on the wall on that.

Enough of my pity party. Thank you guys for keeping us stocked, I say us as in us the rank and file people who get to shelter in place while yall are out there. My permit means jack chit. I ain't no trucker.

Thank you everyone

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Hang in there Moe, trucking will still be here after things calm down. Were you planning on doing paid training or what's the plan to get your CDL?

Any grocery stores nearby that you could try to work at for the short term? Despite places being locked down that is one job that will continue to run.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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