Starting Schneider Orientation

Topic 28035 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Dean R.'s Comment
member avatar

Making the final preparations this morning to travel to Gary, Indiana for Schneider Dedicated Orientation. I'll check into the Best Western in Hammond, Indiana early this evening. It's about a 4 hour trip. Due to Covid I was given an individual room.

The shuttle bus leaves the hotel at 6am tomorrow. Looks like a full day of paperwork and medical items.

Any last minute words of advice? Stay safe out there.

Dean

Turtle's Comment
member avatar
Any last minute words of advice?

Breathe.

Seriously. Anytime you're tense or nervous about something, just take a breath. It'll all be fine.

Utilize everything we teach here, and it'll be a breeze. Good luck!

Pete B.'s Comment
member avatar

Schneider is very specific in how they want things done. Don’t worry, you’ll be given cheat sheets/guides/aides... use them, don’t deviate. Go ahead and turn your phone off before you get in a truck during orientation/training; you definitely do not want to absent-mindedly answer or respond to the phone while driving. Bluetooth not allowed either. If you’re officially employed, and need to go grocery shopping, inquire about the company car. Walmart is nearby. There’s free laundry machines in two different rooms in the building. You’ll be fine. Good luck!

Dean R.'s Comment
member avatar

Fail #2. No Schneider for me - at least for this week. Told the medical people in Gary that I had leg pain. Of course I do on a random basis - I was injured in the line of duty as an active Duty Marine. Aches and pain are also Covid symptoms - at least new aches and pains. Mine are old pains. I got booted-out first day. The Gary OC called Schneider Corporate and I got booted out. I have no other symptoms. I could tell my recruiter when my legs stop aching, which can be at any moment on any day, and I can try again next Tuesday. It's not debilitating at all - it's commonly known as veteran's legs or Marines knees. I could try again next Tuesday, but what if I wake up feeling a little achy? Do I go home again next Tuesday? Do I just say I have no leg pain? Looks like grain hauling for me in the near future. You're welcome for my service.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

If these are minor aches and pains, why tell them about it and risk any red flags now? Too late.

“You’re welcome for my service?” What’s that mean? Every driver out here is in the service of helping others as we haul the goods that keep America moving. You’re not special after pulling a few years in the Marine Corps. Are you on a percentage of disability with the VA? Where you shot, blown up, stabbed, bombed, or had a crash landing? I survived all of these. Do I expect a thank you? Never.

I would go back next week and not offer up any unnecessary, involuntary information.

Dean R.'s Comment
member avatar

If these are minor aches and pains, why tell them about it and risk any red flags now? Too late.

“You’re welcome for my service?” What’s that mean? Every driver out here is in the service of helping others as we haul the goods that keep America moving. You’re not special after pulling a few years in the Marine Corps. Are you on a percentage of disability with the VA? Where you shot, blown up, stabbed, bombed, or had a crash landing? I survived all of these. Do I expect a thank you? Never.

I would go back next week and not offer up any unnecessary, involuntary information.

Aye Aye Sir.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

If these are minor aches and pains, why tell them about it and risk any red flags now? Too late.

“You’re welcome for my service?” What’s that mean? Every driver out here is in the service of helping others as we haul the goods that keep America moving. You’re not special after pulling a few years in the Marine Corps. Are you on a percentage of disability with the VA? Where you shot, blown up, stabbed, bombed, or had a crash landing? I survived all of these. Do I expect a thank you? Never.

I would go back next week and not offer up any unnecessary, involuntary information.

double-quotes-end.png

Aye Aye Sir.

That’s cute. A snarky response to me.

Done with this one.

Dean R.'s Comment
member avatar

If these are minor aches and pains, why tell them about it and risk any red flags now? Too late.

“You’re welcome for my service?” What’s that mean? Every driver out here is in the service of helping others as we haul the goods that keep America moving. You’re not special after pulling a few years in the Marine Corps. Are you on a percentage of disability with the VA? Where you shot, blown up, stabbed, bombed, or had a crash landing? I survived all of these. Do I expect a thank you? Never.

I would go back next week and not offer up any unnecessary, involuntary information.

No. I’m not “special after a few years in the Marine Corps.” Would that apply to the Army? Navy? Air Firce? Snarky comment. Cool.

I’m done too.

Moderators - feel free to delete my account.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Wow Dean...that didn’t take much. Rather self-destructive, hasty and short-sighted ...you need us way more than we need you.

You might want to chill, rethink this, and thicken up your thin skin.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Dean, I just want to add some context, or maybe just a dose of reality in here for ya. I could fill a page with names of the companies that rejected me when I wanted to start driving a truck for my second career at age 53. I finally got an invite to an orientation, travelled something like 38 hours on a Greyhound bus, and got put right back on the bus two days later. Their physician sent me home for a hernia that I was completely unaware of.

Eight weeks later after surgery and limited recuperation I was back on the bus to their orientation. Three days into it and their physical therapist determined I was too weak to be a flatbedder! Well, I was kind of weak - I'd just had surgery! Back on the bus for my 4th 38 hour joy ride!

They said I could come back in a month when I was further recuperated and stronger. Weeks later, after getting my bus ticket for my 3rd trip back, they called me one day before boarding the bus saying that someone in upper level management didn't want me back up there. They decided they had already wasted enough money on me. My bus fare was taken away.

That was a major setback, but there's other companies that might take me. I now take an even longer bus ride from Texas to Pittsburgh and on my second day of orientation they tell me it's been too much time from my graduation at a private CDL school - my CDL is considered stale! They insist I go through school again. Well, that's not happening, so on a whim I have them put me on a bus to Nashville, TN where I make my 4th attempt at attending a trucking company's orientation.

Finally! Somebody hired me! I endured a ridiculous trainer, but stuck it out because... well because this is something I wanted badly.

It's never easy starting this career, and it's typically even more trying to make a good go of it once you get your own truck. One thing is for sure though, being quick to say "I'm done" will for sure keep you from the kind of enjoyment I'm getting from it nowadays.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More