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Cody S.'s Comment
member avatar

Alright guys, first time poster here. So, I went out to Salt Lake at the end of February and went through CR England's program to get my cdl. Passed my exam March 12th and was hired on March 16th. However, on August 30th, I had a pretty severe hudroplane (or skid I guess) accident and was ejected from the vehicle during a wreck in Oklahoma City.

I was hospitalized in Oklahoma City for 8 days and spent another 13 days in Physical therapy there. I've been home since the night of September 20th. I'm currently still out on injury, and on Worker's Comp.

However, earlier today I spoke to an individual who told me I will not be able to return to work because the accident was an 11 point accident (apparently over 7 is automatic dq)...and I was apparently supposed to be told this in August, but THAT safety manager is no longer with the company. I talked to another person from the safety department after that and was told that the accident was not showing on my safety record or report and is apparently not being counted against my CSA....which is 36 according to what I was told.

My question to you all....Once I'm fully released by my doctors, which probably won't happen until next month, how should I proceed if I want to continue with this career? What companies would be good to look into? Appreciate it guys, I really want to continue with this career!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

If you can get back with CR England, go there get a year of safe driving under your belt before you make a move. You will have to report that accident on any future driving job application.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hello Cody, and welcome to our forum!

I am probably as confused as you are right now, so let me explain what is so confusing. Let me pull a quote from your post. Here's the part that has me confused.

I talked to another person from the safety department after that and was told that the accident was not showing on my safety record or report and is apparently not being counted against my CSA....which is 36 according to what I was told.

Basically you've been driving at C.R. England for 5 months. What in the world happened that gave you a 36 on your CSA score? I'm fairly confident I can say that this accident is putting that score on your CSA record. It doesn't matter if C.R. England hasn't put it on your safety record/report at the company yet. That was a D.O.T. reported accident. You have two separate issues that are not necessarily equal. Your CSA score is not company related. That score comes from things like moving violations, accidents, and any type event you were involved with in a CMV which garnered the attention of law enforcement personnel. It doesn't come from any reports or records that your company is keeping on you.

Was this a roll-over accident? I've seen plenty of truck accidents in my day. I even had a driver working for me who rolled one of my big trucks over, but I've seen very few accidents where the driver was ejected from the vehicle. Were you wearing your seat belt? Are you withholding some pertinent information from us? To get ejected indicates a serious accident. You are probably very fortunate to be alive! Were there weather conditions that contributed to this accident? Was your speed excessive for the road conditions? You referred to it as both a "skid" and a "hydroplane." Those are two different types of accidents. Were there other vehicles involved? Did your truck have to be towed? This was a serious enough accident that your CSA score has really taken a big hit.

My question to you all....Once I'm fully released by my doctors, which probably won't happen until next month, how should I proceed if I want to continue with this career? What companies would be good to look into? Appreciate it guys, I really want to continue with this career!

Cody, I'm just not sure we have enough information here to help. I'm not even sure we can at this point. You had a very serious accident, and it seems that C.R. England is not going to re-hire you. That makes it really tough to get back in the driver's seat anywhere else. You've also got a 36 on your CSA score which is another big blemish to deal with. I wish I had better news for you, but you are in a bind. All you can do is apply everywhere and be up front about what happened.

I hate seeing these type posts as a person's first post in here. I always wish we had been involved helping you from the beginning. When a rookie driver has a bad accident it is usually really tough to get past it. Minor accidents can sometimes be managed so that we keep our jobs or our careers. Serious accidents have serious consequences. I sincerely hope you'll survive this and be able to share with us the outcome. I just don't know what advice to give you other than put out applications everywhere. Maybe, just maybe, someone will give you a chance, More than likely you'll need to land a job in a small company hauling scrap metal, recyclables, or gravel. Maybe you could use your CDL with a road construction contractor or something like that. You may have better success seeking employment ads somewhere like Craig's List. I don't think you are going to get on with a major carrier. I'd focus on smaller companies that are willing to fudge a little and take a chance on you.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Your only hope is to apply everywhere but it's going to be tough. You can use this link to Apply For Truck Driving Jobs and see if anybody gives you a shot. Be prepared to hear no. You have several factors that are going to hinder your ability to get another job. You have less than 1 year of experience, a very severe accident, and you were terminated from CRE which is known to be far more lenient than other companies. Be prepared to explain to potential employers the facts and what you learned to avoid this from repeating. Most companies require at a minimum 6 months of SAFE experience after the accident to consider you. You received 12 points for the accident. It takes 3 years for those points to fall off. Year 1 points are multiplied by 3 so thats where the 36 comes from, 1 year after it'll be 24, 2 years after 24 before finally falling off at the 3rd year post accident.

Good luck, please keep us posted.

This is a great reminder for all of us exactly how quickly things can change and one lapse in judgment or moment of inattention can have extremely serious consequences for our health and careers.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar
Year 1 points are multiplied by 3 so thats where the 36 comes from, 1 year after it'll be 24, 2 years after 24 before finally falling off at the 3rd year post accident.

Correction CSA points stick with you for only 2 years, not 3.

Points are multiplied depending on how recent the violation was. 3x – Within the past six months. 2x – Within the past six to twelve months. 1x – Within the past twelve to twenty-four months.

What tickets were you issued that resulted in 12 base points?

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

Cody S.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello Cody, and welcome to our forum!

I am probably as confused as you are right now, so let me explain what is so confusing. Let me pull a quote from your post. Here's the part that has me confused.

double-quotes-start.png

I talked to another person from the safety department after that and was told that the accident was not showing on my safety record or report and is apparently not being counted against my CSA....which is 36 according to what I was told.

double-quotes-end.png

Basically you've been driving at C.R. England for 5 months. What in the world happened that gave you a 36 on your CSA score? I'm fairly confident I can say that this accident is putting that score on your CSA record. It doesn't matter if C.R. England hasn't put it on your safety record/report at the company yet. That was a D.O.T. reported accident. You have two separate issues that are not necessarily equal. Your CSA score is not company related. That score comes from things like moving violations, accidents, and any type event you were involved with in a CMV which garnered the attention of law enforcement personnel. It doesn't come from any reports or records that your company is keeping on you.

Was this a roll-over accident? I've seen plenty of truck accidents in my day. I even had a driver working for me who rolled one of my big trucks over, but I've seen very few accidents where the driver was ejected from the vehicle. Were you wearing your seat belt? Are you withholding some pertinent information from us? To get ejected indicates a serious accident. You are probably very fortunate to be alive! Were there weather conditions that contributed to this accident? Was your speed excessive for the road conditions? You referred to it as both a "skid" and a "hydroplane." Those are two different types of accidents. Were there other vehicles involved? Did your truck have to be towed? This was a serious enough accident that your CSA score has really taken a big hit.

double-quotes-start.png

My question to you all....Once I'm fully released by my doctors, which probably won't happen until next month, how should I proceed if I want to continue with this career? What companies would be good to look into? Appreciate it guys, I really want to continue with this career!

double-quotes-end.png

Cody, I'm just not sure we have enough information here to help. I'm not even sure we can at this point. You had a very serious accident, and it seems that C.R. England is not going to re-hire you. That makes it really tough to get back in the driver's seat anywhere else. You've also got a 36 on your CSA score which is another big blemish to deal with. I wish I had better news for you, but you are in a bind. All you can do is apply everywhere and be up front about what happened.

I hate seeing these type posts as a person's first post in here. I always wish we had been involved helping you from the beginning. When a rookie driver has a bad accident it is usually really tough to get past it. Minor accidents can sometimes be managed so that we keep our jobs or our careers. Serious accidents have serious consequences. I sincerely hope you'll survive this and be able to share with us the outcome. I just don't know what advice to give you other than put out applications everywhere. Maybe, just maybe, someone will give you a chance, More than likely you'll need to land a job in a small company hauling scrap metal, recyclables, or gravel. Maybe you could use your CDL with a road construction contractor or something like that. You may have better success seeking employment ads somewhere like Craig's List. I don't think you are going to get on with a major carrier. I'd focus on smaller companies that are willing to fudge a little and take a chance on you.

Old School, my apologies. I realize that was a bit jumbled. As far as the CSA score goes, I had another minor incident in June but that was during backing. I was trying to back up a slogjt Incline to a dock and the air supply was low, so the cab jumped forward and lightly bumped a guard rail. My partner tried to tell me not to even bother with reporting it but I did. So I'm sure that added to it. I also had one for violation, due to a tire going out eight before I was spelled in for a DOT inspection.

Now, as far as the accident goes, I WAS wearing my seatbelt, I never take that lightly. I remember going around a vehicle, but I don't recall exceeding the speed limit. The next thing, I can remember, is that the cab lost traction, was spinning out. I remember the cab going to the left side of the road and making impact with something and then going to the right and the cab starting to turn over on the driver's side. I lost consciousness as the cab was turning over.

They found me outside the truck, in a pool of blood.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Cody S.'s Comment
member avatar

No other vehicles were hit, and I reviced no tickets or citations. The patrolman told my aunt, over the phone, that the incident was not my fault.

Cody S.'s Comment
member avatar

What tickets were you issued that resulted in 12 base points?

I haven't received any tickets, for anything. I received one dot violation during an inspection, tire went out on me shortly before being pulled in for an inspection. And I lightly bumped a guard rail in June, no damage to either that or the cab though. Other than those two matters, the big wreck in August is the only other thing that's happened.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Cody, this one just has me confused. You made it worse for me when you added more information. You definitely describe a "preventable accident" when you say...

as far as the accident goes, I WAS wearing my seatbelt, I never take that lightly. I remember going around a vehicle, but I don't recall exceeding the speed limit. The next thing, I can remember, is that the cab lost traction, was spinning out. I remember the cab going to the left side of the road and making impact with something and then going to the right and the cab starting to turn over on the driver's side. I lost consciousness as the cab was turning over.

That is a preventable accident. You were passing a vehicle when road conditions were not good. Otherwise it makes no sense that your tractor lost traction and began spinning out, but then you say...

The patrolman told my aunt, over the phone, that the incident was not my fault.

That just doesn't add up correctly. I'm not trying to be combative or critical, I'm just saying that these kind of kinks in your story are going to be big red flags to any potential employment. This was a preventable accident. You are going to have to recognize that to get past it. I have dealt with a lot of people in safety at these big trucking companies. I don't think you are going to find anyone that thinks this was not your fault. It doesn't matter that you don't have a citation. A roll-over is well nigh impossible to sweep under the rug. You didn't even really say it was a roll-over in your first post. Did you notice how we kind of figured that out and then you came out with it? We don't roll trucks over and then have the luxury of it not being considered our fault. A roll-over is a preventable accident. I can't conceive of a highway patrolman telling your aunt something like he did. Don't take that wrong. I'm not accusing you of being dishonest. I just think your aunt was distraught and maybe just kind of heard what she wanted to hear.

This one is going to be tough. I don't know how to advise you other than what I did previously. I hope you can get behind the wheel again, but you need to be prepared - this is going to be one tough uphill struggle for you. That's the reality of your situation.

Cody S.'s Comment
member avatar

That is a preventable accident. You were passing a vehicle when road conditions were not good.

That just doesn't add up correctly. I'm not trying to be combative or critical, I'm just saying that these kind of kinks in your story are going to be big red flags to any potential employment. This was a preventable accident. You are going to have to recognize that to get past it. I have dealt with a lot of people in safety at these big trucking companies. I don't think you are going to find anyone that thinks this was not your fault. It doesn't matter that you don't have a citation. A roll-over is well nigh impossible to sweep under the rug. You didn't even really say it was a roll-over in your first post. Did you notice how we kind of figured that out and then you came out with it? We don't roll trucks over and then have the luxury of it not being considered our fault. A roll-over is a preventable accident. I can't conceive of a highway patrolman telling your aunt something like he did. Don't take that wrong. I'm not accusing you of being dishonest. I just think your aunt was distraught and maybe just kind of heard what she wanted to hear.

This one is going to be tough. I don't know how to advise you other than what I did previously. I hope you can get behind the wheel again, but you need to be prepared - this is going to be one tough uphill struggle for you. That's the reality of your situation.

Old School, understood. That has been bugging me somewhat, the passing around the other vehicle. So now I know to be upfront, and assume full responsibility for it. Not taking any of this the wrong way, sir. I appreciate the raw honesty, sincerely. It was an uphill battle getting into this industry in the first place, gonna have to fight through it again!

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