Companies That Don’t Use DAC

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David P.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello. I was terminated from Roehl for the reason of Safety. I was still in training and it wasn’t good training. Is there any company that doesn’t use a DAC or one that would hire me with that record?

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

Do you have your CDL or were you a permit holder training? If you have your CDL, did you receive it through Roehl's training?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

David, welcome to our forum!

Roehl has a top notch training program. Would you like to tell us what the real problem is? We're all truck drivers here - we don't fall for bull excrement. If you want to own your issues and move forward we can help.

How about telling us the whole story? I think we can help you then. By the way, I don't think you'll find many companies hiring rookies that don't use DAC. There's a good reason for that.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Really David? Roehl has terrible training because you were fired? I know many drivers that disagree.

This site is named Trucking Truth for a reason. Please remember that here and everywhere else, for that matter. You will probably have much better progress.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello. I was terminated from Roehl for the reason of Safety. I was still in training and it wasn’t good training. Is there any company that doesn’t use a DAC or one that would hire me with that record?

1 - What specific "reason of safety"? 2 - What specifically wasn't "good" about the training"?

Along with what everyone else said.

Since you were driving for them, YOU ARE REQUIRED TO LIST THEM AS A PREVIOUS EMPLOYER. And any FUTURE EMPLOYER WILL CHECK YOUR REFERENCES - because they are REQUIRED TO BY LAW.

And pretty much every major employer that HIRES TRAINEES (because you never completed training, according to your post) - IS GOING TO USE DAC.

So - how about you come clean with SOME DETAILS - and we can make suggestions BASED ON YOUR RESPONSES...

Rick

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Welcome David, your new both to this site and the industry. You left alot out of your post, probably because you are looking for agreement and a little encouraging info.

Roehl has been in the training business a long time. I went there 7 years ago and still recommend them for new drivers. They work with students as much as possible. They want people to succeed.

That said, it is possible you had a bad experience, however you sound as you want to blame them for it. Is it possible you had issues and didn’t heed their help to fix them? Just asking.

You didn’t say if you completed your training and obtained your cdl or not.

I can tell you any company hiring new inexperienced drivers are using DAC. They have too much liability not to. Small mom/pop or private fleets may not use it but their insurance carrier will not let them hire anyone less than 2 years recent experience.

Not what you want to hear, but it is honest.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

David P.'s Comment
member avatar

Basically I was in training still didn’t completely understand what I was doing and they said that I blew through a red light when that wasn’t the case.

David, welcome to our forum!

Roehl has a top notch training program. Would you like to tell us what the real problem is? We're all truck drivers here - we don't fall for bull excrement. If you want to own your issues and move forward we can help.

How about telling us the whole story? I think we can help you then. By the way, I don't think you'll find many companies hiring rookies that don't use DAC. There's a good reason for that.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Rubber Duck's Comment
member avatar

Did you explain to them you didn’t run a red light. I’ve been caught off guard at many lights and I’ve seen them turn red as I passed under them. If that’s what you did that’s not really that bad. Another thing I’ve done is pulled out into the intersection on a green left turn. Then the light turned red and I completed the turn on red. That’s also not a big deal if done safely. What was your red light like?

Basically I was in training still didn’t completely understand what I was doing and they said that I blew through a red light when that wasn’t the case.

double-quotes-start.png

David, welcome to our forum!

Roehl has a top notch training program. Would you like to tell us what the real problem is? We're all truck drivers here - we don't fall for bull excrement. If you want to own your issues and move forward we can help.

How about telling us the whole story? I think we can help you then. By the way, I don't think you'll find many companies hiring rookies that don't use DAC. There's a good reason for that.

double-quotes-end.png

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Did they have it on camera.or is that what the trainer said?

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Basically I was in training still didn’t completely understand what I was doing and they said that I blew through a red light when that wasn’t the case.

David, we are still wanting to help. I am seriously proud of you for coming back to us with this additional information. But... You didn't give us anything to go on. Your first post basically told us how bad their training is. We already know that isn't true. I'm not calling you a liar, but I am trying to point out that you are a total greenhorn at this. They are the experts here. You came to them for a job, and now you want to sound as if you know way more about training new drivers than they do. That won't fly here.

What in the world do you know about trucking that qualifies you to decide what makes a training program good or bad? Think about how you came to us. You came here trying to convince us that a highly respected training program is no good. But so far you've only determined that it was no good because you failed. Does that sound reasonable to you? It doesn't come across well at all.

Now you have given us some additional information. We are thankful that maybe you really are wanting some help. Wait! The only thing I can determine from this additional information is that you are now accusing them of being liars. You say...

Basically I was in training still didn’t completely understand what I was doing and they said that I blew through a red light when that wasn’t the case.

We've got a great case of "He said, She said" here. Something didn't go right at that light. Do you want to give us your version of the event? We still have very little to go on. I can promise you the event was captured on camera, or your trainer was clearly fearing for their life while you were driving. I am almost certain one or the other of those two scenarios took place. Otherwise they would still be working with you and trying to help you get your CDL and a job. They don't just fire people from training for no good reason. You want us to believe something that just doesn't happen out here. You obviously did something (or things) serious enough to give them a big reason to think twice about continuing with you. Think about what you initially came in here wanting to know. You wanted to know...

Is there any company that doesn’t use a DAC or one that would hire me with that record?

When a new driver comes to us with a question like that they typically know they have screwed themselves over pretty good. Mistakes in a big rig almost always have severe consequences. You are now looking for a way to avoid those consequences. It just can't be done. You have got to learn from this mistake and you have got to be able to convince your next employer what it is that you learned. I'm sure we are sounding harsh to you but there's only one way to get past a really bad screw up in trucking. Here's how you do it.

  • You face the facts.
  • You acknowledge where you went wrong.
  • You figure out what kind of lessons you learned from your mistake.
  • You move forward with every intention of taking the proper steps to correct your shortcomings.

None of that is easy. We know that. How do we know it? We are truckers who are still in the game. Most of us have made some pretty stupid mistakes. Most of us have done something we probably should have been fired for. We knew that, and we acknowledged it. We explained to our manages that we understand how we made that terrible mistake, and we made clear to them what we learned from the events that took place.

I would honestly love to hear how the conversation went when they fired you. I'd bet a hundred dollars you could have done a much better job of being humble, respectful, and teachable during that conversation. Am I right about that? Did you get defensive and try to lay the blame on someone else or on certain circumstances that you think had a bad effect on your encounter with that red light? That is exactly what they don't want to hear. They want to hear you tell them what you learned from this bad experience. If you didn't learn anything, you really weren't paying much attention. You admit this...

I didn’t completely understand what I was doing

That's a confession that doesn't help anybody. Surely you knew that red lights mean stop. There was some other reason you didn't stop. It had nothing to do with the fact that you didn't completely understand what you were doing.

I'm sure some folks think I am being too tough on you, but dammit I want you guys to become successful truck drivers. You have got to be cognizant of the liability you become while captaining an 80,000 pound machine on public roadways. Any refusal to acknowledge your mistakes and shortcomings will not be tolerated. You learned one of trucking's cardinal rules. Drivers have to accept their own personal responsibilities. There's just no getting around that rule. Now you are dealing with the consequences.

I hope you can receive what I am saying. I am being brutally honest with you because it is very important. I am hoping everyone who reads this will take these comments to heart. I'm not trying to sound like a "know it all" or a cruel ogre. I honestly want you to make something of yourself in this career.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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