Roehl Driver Training From Start To End.....

Topic 2938 | Page 14

Page 14 of 21 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Tracee W.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks PJ. I have been slammed busy too.

Tracee, I am excited for you. You are going to do fine in school. Give me a shout sometime!

No chin, thanks. I am glad so many are finding my mutterings to be useful.

Yesterday, I wanted to manage my clock better than I had the week before. Coming off the reset with a full 70 hours. I had done my trip plan and was ready to roll after getting my pre trip done. I arrived at my pick up around 1100. I am really glad I bought the cheap CB the other day. They gave you instructions over the CB. I got weighed and backed in to dock 14 under a covered area. They got me loaded and I got to put lumber tarps on. I asked a couple of experienced drivers to critique my work after each step. I asked the first one to check my strap placement. He said I had done well. While I was cranking down the straps, the ratchet clicked in to a spot so I was pulling the bar out to crank down a litte more. POP! The bar flys up and pops me on the underside of my chin. It hit me on the right side of my chin and my left jaw popped. It hit me so hard, I sat down on the ground because I was going to got out I thought. I sat there for about 10 minutes. It hurt. I thought I had broken my jaw. I recovered. I think my jaw got dislocated and then popped right back in. It has been really sore but I am OK.. It could have been much worse. Anyway, I got the tarps on and asked another driver to take a look. He gave me some pointers and showed me a few spots of were to put an extra bungee or two. People are so willing to help you if you just ask. I hit the scales on the way out and headed out. My goal was to stop when I had completed about 9 and half hours of on duty and drive time. I realized I wasn't going to make it to I - 90 like I had hoped with out running the clock more. So, I called my friend Mike. We were in class together and we talk almost daily now. I knew he was shut down for the night. I asked him if he could find me a TA to stop at near where I was. That was the only place I had a shower credit and I really wanted a shower after being stuck in nowhereville for two days. Luck was not with me, there was nothing on I - 85 for me to stop at. I ended up at a TA on I-90 in Erie, PA. 10 and a half hours of my 70 clock got burnt.

This morning, I got up around 0500 and started driving after my pre trip. I got to the drop at around 1200. I was early but they dd not have a problem with it. The lady directed me to a different gate and then I had to back into a building. Ol boy! They wanted me to enter the door at an angle and maneuver around stacks of wood. There really was plenty of room but I could not see my trailer once it went inside. The pouring rain outside did not help either. Anyway, I got it in with about 10 get out and lookies. The lady asked how long t would take me to untarp. I told her I was new. She said it was no rush. I told her an hour but I was not sure. By the time she came back, I was putting away my last few bungees. She took the forklift and helped me put my tarps back in the box. Then she got me unloaded pretty quick. I was surprised how much faster was untarping and tarping. You really do learn more by doing it alone. You have to figure it out and get a system that works for you. After I was done, I had a pre trip plan for a relay out of the terminal in Gary. I was really hoping that was what was going to happen. I needed to get laundry done. So, it all worked out. I got to Gary and dropped my trailer and picked up the relay trailer. I got all my equipment traded out. Got laundry done. Took a shower. Now, sleepy time. I have to be in TN tomorrow at 1930. It says I can not arrive early. I am hoping that a call in the morning will allow me to get there earlier. If not, I get to chill out for a bit. I may just leave early in the morning and get close to them and then just take a long break or nap. Not sure, going to wait and see what time I wake up...

WT, I have also taken a breaker bar to the chin and ended up in my backside about 8 foot from the trailer... not fun and I hope you are recovering quickly. Sounds like everyday you are inproving buddy, keep up the good work and get some rest. Last day at work for me today... YAHOO! Can't wait to get out of here. Will be in Marshfield Sunday afternoon fired up and ready for Monday morning! Safe travels! T

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Wine Taster's Comment
member avatar

If I happen to be in Marshfield, I will be sure to say Hi!

Yesterday, I tried to make things happen. I had a 1930 delivery appointment and you were not allowed to arrive any earlier than 15 minutes before. So, I got up and started driving at 0730. I called the company I was delivering to but could not get anyone to speak with me. I even left a message and nobody called back. So, I called my FM and asked if they could get me an earlier appointment. Nope! All booked. I ended up with time to kill. Luckily, there was a Flying J and a Walmart very close to my delivery. So, I went and spent a lot of money for things I needed for my truck. I got the little plastic bins with slide out doors, silverware (try making a PB & J with a plastic knife), tupperware bowls with lids, cleaning supplies, etc. Most important, I stocked up on food. I got a 12 volt cooler and one of those lunchbox cookers. A couple of cases of water is always handy. I still forgot a lot of things I needed but I am pretty comfortable now. I need some fuzzy blankets. All I got is a sleeping bag and fitted **** right now. Then I went and did my delivery. The guy that checks you in was the biggest %$#@$%^& I have ever met. My appointment was at 1930. I was there promptly at 1915. He decided to end his break and slowly walk out at 1945. No motivation and the worst attitude ever. Well, I finally got unloaded at 2100. I had exactly 14 minutes on my clock. I rolled into the Flying J with 3 minutes to spare. I was happy that I found space to park.

This morning I got up and headed to my next pick up. I have three days to get this load 450 miles. They had me scheduled to deliver at 1400 Monday and you can not arrive early. What? Wait! OMG! I am going to be sitting a lot. I called the FM and asked if they could get me in earlier. It got moved to 0600 Monday. Not much better but better. So, I got loaded with aluminium coils suicide style. This is a first and they make me nervous. If I don't secure them right, they roll over my cab and crush me in it like a can of tuna fish. There were a lot of other drivers there that were really helpful. Backing into the building where the loaded me was comical for others to watch I am sure. I got it in without hitting anything. I drove a couple of hundred miles and decided to take a break. I probably could have made it to the drop tonight but why bother. I can not deliver until Monday. Tomorrow, early in the morning around 0300, I will drive threw Chicago and not have to worry about traffic. Luckily the place I drop will let me stay there. I will shut down tomorrow around 1000. ( I have to stop for fuel at our terminal so I will get a shower then too.) Then I will just hang out in my truck for almost 24 hours. Ain't life grand? ROFL!

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Wine Taster's Comment
member avatar

Ol forgot, tonight I had my first truck cooked meal. I bought a bunch of chicken breast yesterday. I seperated them into separate ziplock bags. Today, I stopped after getting loaded and took my 30 minute break. I made a couple of sandwiches for lunch. Then I got dinner to cooking. 1 can of diced potatoes ($0.50), 1 can vegetable melody ($0.50), 1 chicken breast ($1.00). All of it went into the little tin you place in the lunchbox cooker. By the time I stopped three hours later, I had an awesome hot meal. It tasted great. Clean up was very easy. It was cheap. I have leftovers for lunch tomorrow. Just kicked back watching TV and eating a hot meal. Life is good!

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

Jim M.'s Comment
member avatar

Wine taster,

That sounds awesome. Way to go. Another couple of months and I'll be enjoying those same things.

Thanks for the great posts!! smile.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Wine Taster's Comment
member avatar

Well, if you have been reading, you will know I was told to pick up on Friday night and deliver on Monday at 1400. I had a total of about 500 miles to cover. My first try at making something happen was by calling the pickup so I could get in earlier to load. That was not happening. Then, I called the delivery to see if I could unload early. I could not get anybody on the phone. I called my FM and they said the best they were able to do was get me in at 0600 in Chicago. TRAFFIC! So, I made a few other calls and found out that the delivery place would at least allow me to sleep on their lot. I rolled out this morning around 0700. I was in no rush. Set the cruise on 60 and rolled. In Gary, IN around 1130 and fueled up. I put some chilli in the lunchbox cook. Took a shower. Then headed out. I got to the place I was to deliver at around 1330. I told the guard I had an appointment for delivery at 0600. He said it was no problem for me to sleep there. He said to go sign in with receiving just so they knew I was there for in the morning. I signed in and then did some equipment sorting on my truck. It was a round three and I was hungry. Turned on the TV and opened the lunchbox cooker. Nice steaming hot chilli ready to go. Chilled out eating and watching TV. SHoes kicked off and a knocking comes at my truck door. The security guard says Earl wants to see me. I get out and go into to the building she told me to go to. They looked like they had no clue why I was there. I came back out and Earl appears on a forklift. He says, "Well, do you want to unload or not?" I said I sure did. He said get everything off the load so he could pick it off. He said he would meet me at the dock in 10 or 15 minutes. Wait! What? I had a lumber tarp over two coils. 15 minutes? I went to work. I undid my bungees. I yanked the tarp off. I left the tarp laying in the parking lot and told the guard I would be back to get it. 15 or 20 minutes total, I had the chains off and good ol Earl was unloading me. Making it happen! About 30 minutes later, I had everything put away and was on the road back to the terminal as instructed.

Then Chicago struck. I got lost because of a truck detour. As I was following the detour signs, the last one reads truck detour end. OK, well where do I go now?? I ended up on a side street looking at an unmarked bridge wondering if I could get under it. The GPS was telling me to turn right onto a road with a clearly marked sign.... NO TRUCKS over 5 tons. Great! So I stopped and called in to my FM. He looked at the map and we both knew I had no way to turn around. luckily, it was Sunday and the street I was on was not at all busy. I drove up to the bridge and got out and looked to see if I could make it under. My truck is a mid roof so it is only about 12 foot 6 inches high. My flatbed trailer was empty. BONUS! I was able to get under the bridge and back to the interstate. I made it back to the terminal safe and sound. Crashing for the night. Hopefully, I get a good run in the morning.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Tracee W.'s Comment
member avatar

Well, if you have been reading, you will know I was told to pick up on Friday night and deliver on Monday at 1400. I had a total of about 500 miles to cover. My first try at making something happen was by calling the pickup so I could get in earlier to load. That was not happening. Then, I called the delivery to see if I could unload early. I could not get anybody on the phone. I called my FM and they said the best they were able to do was get me in at 0600 in Chicago. TRAFFIC! So, I made a few other calls and found out that the delivery place would at least allow me to sleep on their lot. I rolled out this morning around 0700. I was in no rush. Set the cruise on 60 and rolled. In Gary, IN around 1130 and fueled up. I put some chilli in the lunchbox cook. Took a shower. Then headed out. I got to the place I was to deliver at around 1330. I told the guard I had an appointment for delivery at 0600. He said it was no problem for me to sleep there. He said to go sign in with receiving just so they knew I was there for in the morning. I signed in and then did some equipment sorting on my truck. It was a round three and I was hungry. Turned on the TV and opened the lunchbox cooker. Nice steaming hot chilli ready to go. Chilled out eating and watching TV. SHoes kicked off and a knocking comes at my truck door. The security guard says Earl wants to see me. I get out and go into to the building she told me to go to. They looked like they had no clue why I was there. I came back out and Earl appears on a forklift. He says, "Well, do you want to unload or not?" I said I sure did. He said get everything off the load so he could pick it off. He said he would meet me at the dock in 10 or 15 minutes. Wait! What? I had a lumber tarp over two coils. 15 minutes? I went to work. I undid my bungees. I yanked the tarp off. I left the tarp laying in the parking lot and told the guard I would be back to get it. 15 or 20 minutes total, I had the chains off and good ol Earl was unloading me. Making it happen! About 30 minutes later, I had everything put away and was on the road back to the terminal as instructed.

Then Chicago struck. I got lost because of a truck detour. As I was following the detour signs, the last one reads truck detour end. OK, well where do I go now?? I ended up on a side street looking at an unmarked bridge wondering if I could get under it. The GPS was telling me to turn right onto a road with a clearly marked sign.... NO TRUCKS over 5 tons. Great! So I stopped and called in to my FM. He looked at the map and we both knew I had no way to turn around. luckily, it was Sunday and the street I was on was not at all busy. I drove up to the bridge and got out and looked to see if I could make it under. My truck is a mid roof so it is only about 12 foot 6 inches high. My flatbed trailer was empty. BONUS! I was able to get under the bridge and back to the interstate. I made it back to the terminal safe and sound. Crashing for the night. Hopefully, I get a good run in the morning.

Great for you getting unloaded early! Always a bonus! Well I made it to the school/hotel. Class starts bright and early tomorrow. Have a great night and hope to meet ya soon! smile.gif

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Tracee W.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Well, if you have been reading, you will know I was told to pick up on Friday night and deliver on Monday at 1400. I had a total of about 500 miles to cover. My first try at making something happen was by calling the pickup so I could get in earlier to load. That was not happening. Then, I called the delivery to see if I could unload early. I could not get anybody on the phone. I called my FM and they said the best they were able to do was get me in at 0600 in Chicago. TRAFFIC! So, I made a few other calls and found out that the delivery place would at least allow me to sleep on their lot. I rolled out this morning around 0700. I was in no rush. Set the cruise on 60 and rolled. In Gary, IN around 1130 and fueled up. I put some chilli in the lunchbox cook. Took a shower. Then headed out. I got to the place I was to deliver at around 1330. I told the guard I had an appointment for delivery at 0600. He said it was no problem for me to sleep there. He said to go sign in with receiving just so they knew I was there for in the morning. I signed in and then did some equipment sorting on my truck. It was a round three and I was hungry. Turned on the TV and opened the lunchbox cooker. Nice steaming hot chilli ready to go. Chilled out eating and watching TV. SHoes kicked off and a knocking comes at my truck door. The security guard says Earl wants to see me. I get out and go into to the building she told me to go to. They looked like they had no clue why I was there. I came back out and Earl appears on a forklift. He says, "Well, do you want to unload or not?" I said I sure did. He said get everything off the load so he could pick it off. He said he would meet me at the dock in 10 or 15 minutes. Wait! What? I had a lumber tarp over two coils. 15 minutes? I went to work. I undid my bungees. I yanked the tarp off. I left the tarp laying in the parking lot and told the guard I would be back to get it. 15 or 20 minutes total, I had the chains off and good ol Earl was unloading me. Making it happen! About 30 minutes later, I had everything put away and was on the road back to the terminal as instructed.

Then Chicago struck. I got lost because of a truck detour. As I was following the detour signs, the last one reads truck detour end. OK, well where do I go now?? I ended up on a side street looking at an unmarked bridge wondering if I could get under it. The GPS was telling me to turn right onto a road with a clearly marked sign.... NO TRUCKS over 5 tons. Great! So I stopped and called in to my FM. He looked at the map and we both knew I had no way to turn around. luckily, it was Sunday and the street I was on was not at all busy. I drove up to the bridge and got out and looked to see if I could make it under. My truck is a mid roof so it is only about 12 foot 6 inches high. My flatbed trailer was empty. BONUS! I was able to get under the bridge and back to the interstate. I made it back to the terminal safe and sound. Crashing for the night. Hopefully, I get a good run in the morning.

double-quotes-end.png

Great for you getting unloaded early! Always a bonus! Well I made it to the school/hotel. Class starts bright and early tomorrow. Have a great night and hope to meet ya soon! smile.gif

WT, Guess who is in our truck learning how to train us newbies? Your OTR trainer Bill! I didn't know it until I was telling him about the load you told us about where y'all got stuck trying to unload a tractor I think? He started laughing and said that he was your trainer and was a fun day that was! He is a very nice guy as well as Brian, and I think Jim and I lucked out getting them for our trainers! Second day, shifting is getting better, but I have a long way to go with watching my RPMs down shifting... tomorrow is our BIG DAY ON THE ROAD... a wee bit nervous, but if they think I am ready...I will trust their judgement. It really is a lot to take in each day but I am enjoying the experience just the same. Talk to you soon!

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Wine Taster's Comment
member avatar

Tracee,

That is awesome! Is he going to be an instructor at the school now? He never said anything about it. Have fun in school, once you get out here, it is faster learning.

Let me try to cover the past two days that I had. I was at the terminal in Gary. The trip plan I got was to relay a load from Gary to Alabama. I go drop my trailer. Then I got to the equipment room to drop off equipment that had been used on the trailer I was picking up and picked up paperwork. I head over to the trailer I am supposed to pick up. I coupled up and started my pre trip. As I look at the load, I realize that it is not secured properly. There was an experienced driver hooking up for a relay beside me. Just to make sure that I was being a bonehead rookie, I asked him if the load was properly secure. He said it was not and that I should go into the operations window and ask for a guy from training to document it so I would get untarp and tarp pay. I went in and talked to someone on the phone and he said he would be right out. I go back to my truck. A few minutes later, four guys come walking toward my truck. They were not dressed like truckers. They have all been truckers at some point, I am sure. They all come over and look at the load. They said it was a very good thing that I had inspected the securement. They said that had I taken it and slammed on the breaks hard, all that steel may have gone through my cab. So, I went to work untarping. All four of these guys started to help. Office guys getting down and dirty. I was really impressed that they got on the trailer with me. They told me what should be done to properly secure the load. They helped me add the four additional straps. After that, they asked if I needed any more help. I said no and thanked them for all the help and instruction. The big thing to learn here, do not assume someone else did their job properly. Had I taken that trailer without checking it, I would assume responsibility for it. Roll into a scale and the DOT says, "Hey that's not secured legal!" They will not care who secured it, they will care who is driving the truck now. DO YOUR INSPECTIONS! Everyday, every night. DO them!

The next morning I got up and drove to my delivery. I was really short on hours. I timed it so that I arrived right at my appointment. I got the tarps off and the guys there went to work unloading me. I sent in a message saying I was unloaded. I had told my FM I only had 5 hours remaining on my 70 clock. At midnight, I would not get any hours back. I got a trip plan. After looking at it, I figured I could make it on time if, and only if, I got loaded really fast. I needed to drive for about three hours after getting loaded. Then I would be able to drive at midnight Wed night / thurs morning. I would be able to make it by Thursday at 1300. Well, needless to say, it did not go that way. I was pretty irritated with the entire process. By the time I got loaded and tarped, I had 48 minutes to find somewhere to shut down. It was a really long day. It did work out, I think I can still make it on time. I can drive 2.5 hours today before my 70 clock runs out. Then at midnight, I get back almost 11 hours. So, drive a little today, then hit it hard at midnight after another 10 hour break.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Wine Taster's Comment
member avatar

Yesterday, I made my delivery in the morning. Then I picked up my next load. It is a fairly short run to TN. A little over 500 miles and not due until Monday. So, I shut down early to save hours on my 70 clock. Today, I got up and tinkered around the truck stop for a while. I was in no rush. I drove for a while and talked a bit on my mickey mouse CB. Just so happens, I was coming up on a CB shop on I-75. Exit 99 a driver had told me. I whipped into this CB shop. I must say I was very impressed with this shop. Now, I have a bright and shiny new cobra 29 that has been "tuned". The guys in this shop were very knowledgeable and had me getting a good range in no time. I can get 4 - 6 miles range and that is perfect for me. I told the guy in the shop, I was not trying to talk to the astronauts on the space station. I spent about 30 - 40 minutes there and then I got back to driving. I made it all the way to the exit that I take to go to my first drop. I am now 40 miles away from my drop and will just be hanging out. Sadly, the first drop must be there before 0500 Sunday. That makes it impossible for me to get the reset in. I asked if I could sleep on the lot so I could get that reset done. Nope! Tomorrow, I am going to do some cleaning inside my truck. The outside is spotless now because of the monsoon I drove through today a couple of times. It rained so hard that my tarps are clean. Hope everything under them stayed dry. Maybe, I can get some laundry done as well. As for now.... sleepy time!

Weatherman's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the update WT. Just curious, if you don't mind me asking, how much did the new CB cost you?

Page 14 of 21 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More