Companies Are Not Interested In Hiring Me Without A Recent Job History

Topic 29384 | Page 1

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Ty R.'s Comment
member avatar

After talking to several companies they seem to want a recent verifiable work history. That's fair enough. But I still want to train and drive.

I have not worked in the USA since 2003 in Guam for 8 years. Before 2003 I have a good verifiable work history including 4 years driving aircraft fueling tankers in Virginia where i got my pilots license too. Since 2003 I've been out of the country traveling and just returned early 2020.

Thanksgiving weekend it hit me. I decided I wanted to drive trucks. I still have the traveling bug in me. I don't want to do the same thing every day at the same place. Also, with the pandemic it seemed like a good choice of work as to limit my exposure.

I'm in San Diego and have been looking into schools and I don't find myself getting very excited about the schools here. I called a school to ask some questions and asked along the lines of why I should pick that school and what they offer vs. other schools. I was told that the instructors were very cool and not so strict and would go easy on me. After I got off the phone I was thinking I should have asked if the examiner would go easy on me too. Two of the bigger schools if not the biggest here are United Truck Driving School and Western Truck School. They both share the same training yard. Whats up with that? We aren't that short of land here unless they are owned by the same people. Its a dirt lot shaped like a long narrow triangle with no facilities other than an outhouse and no shade. It just looked too narrow and cheap. I guess a truck/trailer could do a u-turn at the wider end of the lot. Actually I just measured the lot on Google Earth. The widest part at the entrance is 50-52 meters wide. More than I thought. From there it just got more narrow. The other two sides taper to a point a ways down. I only measured the max width.

I thought about going to a school in the Los Angeles area there so many schools only 100 miles away from me but I would have to pay for lodging and it would cost as much as school for 6 weeks in a motel. Plus I would need to get up there for a few days just to check out the schools to see which one might be for me. Arizona even has many schools.

So I was thinking paid training and called around and did online applications. That's when I realized my work history is going to be an issue. Originally I wasn't considering paid training cause I read about less than ideal living conditions at paid training facilities.

Now I'm confused and worried. If I go to a school and get my CDL will any companies hire me considering my work history? I don't have any other issues. No tickets or DUIs, no arrests, warrants or other legal problems ever, no drug use and don't drink for 2+ years, excellent credit. Damn, I'm a good catch!

I know there are more companies I can look into. I have read a bit about C.R. England and CRST and am holding off on contacting them. But what if I do talk to them and my work history is an issue with them as well? They seem like sort of last chance. Maybe my impressions are wrong.

I will get a DOT medial card and my CLP by end of this month. I've been studying as well as doing research.

I have read about convicts being trained and hired. Don't I deserve a chance too? ;)

Do you good & knowledgeable people have any ideas, points of view or advice?

Cheers & Good Year to you All

BTW...I applied for paid training on this website before I posted this.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

CLP:

Commercial Learner's Permit

Before getting their CDL, commercial drivers will receive their commercial learner's permit (CLP) upon passing the written portion of the CDL exam. They will not have to retake the written exam to get their CDL.

Papa Pig's Comment
member avatar

Ty. Welcome to trucking truth.

After reading your story I think paid training with (anyone) that is willing to accept you would be the way to go. If you pay for a cdl and then apply , your work history will still be an issue with some of the companies. A cdl is a great thing to have but without experience you are still seen as a liability. Lots of folks think that companies are going to knock down their door to hire them but that’s Just not the case. Don’t believe everything you read about companies online. If a company is willing to give you a shot when others aren’t , don’t you think they might deserve the same consideration? There is a guy who just posted on the main forum about his experience with CR England. It would be worth asking him some questions. Good luck! I hope you can find a way to get your foot in the door!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Damn, I'm a good catch!

I have read about convicts being trained and hired. Don't I deserve a chance too? ;)

Hello Ty, welcome to our forum!

When I got into trucking I did it for a second career. I had thirty years of solid employment - all of it at the same job! I thought I was the perfect catch! Great credit, solid work history, no criminal convictions, blah, blah, blah. I was the poster child for the best candidate you can hire! Guess what? No one wanted me for some strange reason. I got more rejections than you can imagine.

I graduated at the top of my trucking school. I had a 97 average score. The fellow with the lowest score in my class and could barely shift gears in the truck got accepted by Roehl before we even finished our schooling. The response I got from Roehl was, "Sorry, we had better candidates to choose from!"

Hiring new rookie drivers is a crap shoot. There is nothing about them that will give any trucking company a clue whether or not they will adapt and become professionals who can contribute to the company's goals. There are a good many high school drop outs with terrible credit who may very well turn out to be better truck drivers than me or you. There is just no way to tell about anyone's future in this career.

That work history requirement is a Federal regulation. It came about after 9/11. It is in place not to assure the companies that you are a good solid employee, but rather to keep foreign terrorists from infiltrating our transportation industry and doing damage with trucks like they did with airplanes back in the day. Anyone who hires you must have your work history records on file. That is a FMCSA requirement. They cannot meet that requirement with you.

Since 2003 I've been out of the country traveling and just returned early 2020.

You are a big red flag! You've been out of the country for 17 years! Honestly I think you would do yourself a huge favor by establishing some stateside work history. Surely you have some sort of skills or talents that would allow you to keep a job in San Diego for a few years. That's what I would recommend. Establish some work history for yourself and then jump into trucking.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Anne A. (momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Howdy, Ty .. welcome to TT, and hope you stick around!

Old School .. got to thinking after reading your AWESOME reply (as always....) and just wondering 'out loud' as I often do .. WOULD A DOCK TO DRIVER program work for this instance?

Banks?

Bobcat Bob?

Thoughts?!?!?

Just my 2 pennies ....

~ Anne ~

You are a big red flag! You've been out of the country for 17 years! Honestly I think you would do yourself a huge favor by establishing some stateside work history. Surely you have some sort of skills or talents that would allow you to keep a job in San Diego for a few years. That's what I would recommend. Establish some work history for yourself and then jump into trucking.
Ty R.'s Comment
member avatar

Ty. Welcome to trucking truth.

There is a guy who just posted on the main forum about his experience with CR England. It would be worth asking him some questions.

Hi Papa Pig,

Thank you for taking the time to respond. I believe I saw the post you are referring to and I did give him a reply.

Ty R.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello Old School,

Thanks much for sharing your insight and experience.

double-quotes-start.png

Damn, I'm a good catch!

I have read about convicts being trained and hired. Don't I deserve a chance too? ;)

double-quotes-end.png

You do know that was meant as a joke, right?

double-quotes-start.png

You are a big red flag! You've been out of the country for 17 years! Honestly I think you would do yourself a huge favor by establishing some stateside work history. Surely you have some sort of skills or talents that would allow you to keep a job in San Diego for a few years. That's what I would recommend. Establish some work history for yourself and then jump into trucking.

double-quotes-end.png

Red flag? Why? There are millions of people living, working, going to school and just plain hanging out in countries that are originally from other countries. In America we welcome people from all over the world. They don't expect to get "red flagged" by their home countries. Unless they come from countries with oppressive governments. I'll stop myself there, even though my opinions don't stop there.

As far as working for a few years and then trying to break into trucking...That's not an option. I don't give up that easy and I have only been trying to educate my self for 6 weeks now and I only really started diving in after the holidays. So yeah, lots to learn.

Again, I appreciate your input.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

As stated.... Anyone coming from another country trying to drive a vehicle that can easily and has been used as a bomb is going to be scrutinized. Even those here for 20 years must submit employment for the last 3 years. So why would you expect someone from outside the country. They are fearing radicalization which has augmented thanks to the internet.

Like it or not..it is required. Good luck finding a company that will take you. Even if you pay for school....it could very well be wasted money if you cant get hired.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Ty, your opinions are fine and good, but when you are dealing with government bureaucracy they carry no water. I gave you the facts so that you could educate yourself. I left one thing out, which may be of interest to you. I left it out because I'm not sure it would work in your case. Here it is.

I have helped several folks over the years get past this work history problem by getting three of their acquaintances (not family members) to write a letter stating that they are your friend and are familiar with what you have been doing over the past 17 years abroad. The letter needs to explain in some detail what you have been doing overseas and provide detail of which countries you have been in. They will need to provide a phone number and an email address so that they can be contacted for verification. The letters need to be notarized also. I would make sure these letters are from people who lived here in the states during your time abroad.

All the folks that I know of who had success with this strategy were not lacking work history due to being abroad. They were here maybe taking care of an ill relative or something of that nature. It is an acceptable way that some companies will accept, but I am not certain how it will work for your situation. Good luck sir! That work history requirement is a problem, and you fit right into the profile of folks they are trying to screen out. We wish you the best!

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