Ready To Scream!!

Topic 29460 | Page 2

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Rip40's Comment
member avatar

Well, I'm back! I made it and I only cried once!!!

I went through 3 months of training with a local carrier. There were times when I didn't want to go back to work from my 34 but damn it, I pushed through and did SO WELL!

Thank you to all of the advice and suggestions that I received! The knowledge from this forum had me super ready and although there were Real Life events that I couldn't prepare for, I got a great insight on what to expect and man did it blow my trainers mind.

THANK YOU!!!

IDMtnGal 's Comment
member avatar

Well, I'm back! I made it and I only cried once!!!

I went through 3 months of training with a local carrier. There were times when I didn't want to go back to work from my 34 but damn it, I pushed through and did SO WELL!

Thank you to all of the advice and suggestions that I received! The knowledge from this forum had me super ready and although there were Real Life events that I couldn't prepare for, I got a great insight on what to expect and man did it blow my trainers mind.

THANK YOU!!!

CONGRATULATIONS

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Old School's Comment
member avatar

Congratulations!

This is great news! Please, tell us more. Who are you working for? Are you OTR? Are you regional? What kind of job is it that you are doing? We love hearing the success stories from you guys, and since we hear so little from you, we don't really know what you are up to. We are all ears!

I made it and I only cried once!!!

That is awesome! You did better than most of us!

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Rip40's Comment
member avatar

IDMtnGal,

Thank you!!!

This is great news! Please, tell us more. Who are you working for? Are you OTR? Are you regional? What kind of job is it that you are doing? We love hearing the success stories from you guys, and since we hear so little from you, we don't really know what you are up to. We are all ears!

Oh Boy! Well, I started my training with Mesilla Valley Transportation, based out of El Paso, TX. I initially was regional OTR going from TX to California to Denver, back down to TX and around again. That was for the first week, then I hopped on an OTR train that took me all over! That first week I drove from TX through LA, MS, FL & AL to GA which was great because besides TX, I’d only ever been to 2 of those states before so I was so excited to experience traveling through them. Our normal route was TX - TN (Nashville or Memphis usually) or AR - Cali back and forth for the duration of our clock. I was as far north a Missouri but was asleep for that stop and then on the west coast went up to Portland, OR. (Man what a beautiful country we all reside in!! That drive was my absolute favorite.) I caught on to most things very quickly which was a good surprise to my trainer. We did mostly drop and hook dry van freight. After all of that driving, I can tell you without a doubt that I LOVE THIS JOB! The troubles that I had while on the road were sometimes hectic, nerve-wracking or down right STUPID but I learned something with each and every experience and I wouldn’t trade them for the world.

Some of the crazy?

-We were stuck in a truckstop with no power for 3 days during that ice storm in TX. Not sure if I'm supposed to say this.... we were carrying GENERATORS in our truck that time. Talk about a kick in the tail!!! Not much to learn about that but thought it was ironic.

-Wipers got shut in under the hood, lost both had to sit for most of the day to get them repaired…. Lessoned learned…. speak up when you see something out of place. (I saw it about to happen as it was my trainers accident and I’m not sure why I didn’t say something…. I just didn’t BUT that set BOTH of us back.)

-Needed a part for the truck, spent 3 days in the truck waiting on Dispatch and Repair company to get their heads out trying to get a part… so made the call to have the part delivered by another company driver coming my way for repair to be made at the truck stop. I would have been waiting another 2 days if I waited for the Repair people to find said part…. Lesson that I learned form here! Think outside of the box when solving problems you encounter. <— Just like I read here in the forum!!

Outside of these, I had a tire blow but was unaware as it wrapped itself so tightly around the axle. Got stuck in the snow and locked in a customers yard until the tow truck could come the next day. Fixed my own taillight that needed a little rewiring. (My dad told me that all of my “tinkering” with random stuff around the house was annoying BUT LOOK DAD, IT CAME IN HANDY!!!!!!)

The STUPID?

Experienced a “Sun Down Town”. I honestly didn’t even know what the heck that was until I was there. Got right back in the truck after using the loo and kept it moving…....Lesson…. You can’t fix Stupid. So, just keep pressing on.

A Disgusting trainer that thought it was okay to hit on his trainee, put me in uncomfortable situations and say SUPER inappropriate things while we were driving. <— I reported him as soon as we got back to the yard and requested a new trainer. Got the FANTASTIC one that took me through the rest of my training!…….Lesson…… You’ll find these type of people everywhere. You know, the ones that want to get in the way of your goals and ambitions. Screw those people… I don’t have time for it, so get them out of your way and just keep it moving.

So, Now.

You might remember that I had an offer from Schneider earlier on. Well, left MVT since my training was over. My Husband and I got hired to Jet-Set for Schneider as a team (This team was always the plan, I just wanted to be able to stand on my own two feet as a trucker.) and we start in August.

You guys have honestly been the biggest help in the world!!

Thank you

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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