Should I Keep My CDL?

Topic 29627 | Page 1

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Zach 's Comment
member avatar

As you all know my first driving job was a huge disaster and will probably be used as an example to new drivers and potential drivers on here of what not to do at you're first company lol. I've turned my truck back in today and am moving on with my life trying to figure out what the hell I'm going to do next. My question is, is it worth keeping my CDL or should I downgrade since I will probably never drive a CMV again. By the way just to clear up any confusion since I saw someone on another post saying I was terminated, Western Express never fired me my DM asked me to resign and I agreed so I didn't have a termination on my record. I was having trouble making appointments on time and knew he could use that as a way to get rid of me.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Yes, keep it. I still think you should look into linehaul it would probably be a good fit.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Donna M.'s Comment
member avatar

Wow! How much are u gonna owe them? I’d keep my cdl there’s lots of local jobs, like dump trucks and waste management that require cdl’s . Thought u would make it once u started to get in a routine. Really sorry!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
KH's Comment
member avatar

There’s no reason I can think of not to keep it. Someone just asked about self-certifying as “excepted intrastate” so that you don’t need a current medical card. Of course it severely limits the circumstances where you could drive a cmv , so it’s pretty much just to keep from being downgraded. But you can get a new medical and change back to “non-excepted interstate” if you need to in the future. I suppose another issue might be if it costs more to renew a cdl , in which case you’d have to decide if it’s worth it when the time comes. But like others have said, there are cdl jobs other than driving a tractor-trailer, like delivery, trash, dump truck, cement truck, bus driver.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Intrastate:

The act of purchasers and sellers transacting business while keeping all transactions in a single state, without crossing state lines to do so.

Zach 's Comment
member avatar

Yes, keep it. I still think you should look into linehaul it would probably be a good fit.

I don't think im cut out for that kind of stuff, I struggled with the tight schedule western had me on, I don't think I would last long line haul. If I was to stay out it would be OTR

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar
don't think im cut out for that kind of stuff, I struggled with the tight schedule western had me on, I don't think I would last long line haul. If I was to stay out it would be OTR

There is a schedule but all you have to do is be hooked and leaving by your gate time, drive to your destination turn around and do it all again.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Downgrade it Monday. As you've stated in several posts, you're not cut out for this, or anything else suggested to you.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

I have to agree with Pack.

The problems you faced weren't doom and gloom. They were the kind of problems you figure out and then they're not problems anymore.

When I first started running, it would take me about 2 hours to get my set hooked. My dispatcher would send people out to check on me because 6 was taking so long. They would send emails to my instructor asking what I was struggling with and to see if I need more training.

Fast forward a little over a year. Yesterday they called me and told me they had a run to New Haven, CT with a via to Hartford, CT then back home to the Poconos. My main concern was beating the snow and any empty/doubles bans that would pop up. According to the forecast, I had 8 hours to get back.

I got to New Haven and I was able to drop my trailers, hook my trailers and do my post/pretrip in just under 30 minutes. It would've been faster, but I'd never been there before and I had to find my trailers. I've been to Hartford before so I dropped and hooked in 20. 430 miles and 3 drops and hooks in a little over 8 hours.

The point to all of this is that nobody comes in killing it on day 1. There's a reason that experience is valued. An experienced driver isn't going to deal with the issues you've dealt with because they learned how to handle them and they're no longer issues.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Jammer a's Comment
member avatar

No!!! You’ll never use it bro you wanted out to much and I feel you were not able to work away from home!!! I think that’s what got to you and you needed an excuse to quit and go back home maybe look into the post office your a vet theyle hire you but IMO you never wanted help or put it to use I offered to talk u thru it on the phone that cdl is absolutely not for you unless u get a local job which IMO don’t think you want nothing to do with that monster

As you all know my first driving job was a huge disaster and will probably be used as an example to new drivers and potential drivers on here of what not to do at you're first company lol. I've turned my truck back in today and am moving on with my life trying to figure out what the hell I'm going to do next. My question is, is it worth keeping my CDL or should I downgrade since I will probably never drive a CMV again. By the way just to clear up any confusion since I saw someone on another post saying I was terminated, Western Express never fired me my DM asked me to resign and I agreed so I didn't have a termination on my record. I was having trouble making appointments on time and knew he could use that as a way to get rid of me.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Jammer a's Comment
member avatar

Western doesent have tight schedule especially paper loads! mostly drop an hook with the other loads . Target Walmart ikea tj max only real live loads are paper some Home Depot pet food and I don’t think they ever put you on ithem no sense in keeping your license you’ll never use it you just said it yourself .

< don't think im cut out for that kind of stuff, I struggled with the tight schedule western had me on, I don't think I would last long line haul. If I was to stay out it would be OTR span itemprop="text">

so why do you ask !! When you answer yourself every time???

double-quotes-start.png

Yes, keep it. I still think you should look into linehaul it would probably be a good fit.

double-quotes-end.png

I don't think im cut out for that kind of stuff, I struggled with the tight schedule western had me on, I don't think I would last long line haul. If I was to stay out it would be OTR

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
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