Let's Talk Clothing And Work Boots

Topic 29675 | Page 1

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Vicki M.'s Comment
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I know this is a quiet forum, but I'd like some female input :) My recruiter sent me a list of things to bring to orientation and I am assuming (from what I have read) that I'll be either there or out in a trainers truck for about a month or longer. So, they want me to bring non slip shoes. I have several pairs of hiking boots, but when I asked her about them she said that as long as they have no slip soles, I'll be okay. I think one pair does, but I'll have to check. In case they don't, do you all think I should buy regular work boots, tennis shoes, different hiking boots...They said nothing about a steel toe or an aluminum toe. Any input would be awesome!

As for clothing, they said 3 pairs of jeans/work pants, etc. No problem, but I'd really like to drive in my leggings or yoga pants. I understand you might need the wear and tear of denim for school, but do you drive in jeans? They said nothing about shirts...but I'll probably bring a few tank tops, a few tee shirts and a few long sleeve tee shirts (It will be summer or late spring so I'll pack accordingly). Do I need a dressier shirt for receivers? My current job requires woman's suits daily and evening gowns on New Years...I have it all. Just tell me what to bring :D

And no, I am NOT packing evening gowns and stilettos :D

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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You are way way overthinking this. I wear sneakers, sweats and yoga pants most of the time. Yes I have a pair or cardhart work boots for winter snow and ice. Most of my clothes and jackets now have prime logos so it looks more like a uniform. Maureen has non slip shoes that are slip ons and comfortable. She has a pair of boots too... Doesnt need to have steel toes

No profanity. No cut offs. No flip flops. No tank top mid drift stuff.

And have a variety. On Thursday we left Springfield it was -20 wind chill. Saturday it was 48 in NM. Today is Monday and it was 78 in AZ. So in less than a week we spanned 100 degrees.

Vicki M.'s Comment
member avatar

You are way way overthinking this. I wear sneakers, sweats and yoga pants most of the time. Yes I have a pair or cardhart work boots for winter snow and ice. Most of my clothes and jackets now have prime logos so it looks more like a uniform. Maureen has non slip shoes that are slip ons and comfortable. She has a pair of boots too... Doesnt need to have steel toes

No profanity. No cut offs. No flip flops. No tank top mid drift stuff.

And have a variety. On Thursday we left Springfield it was -20 wind chill. Saturday it was 48 in NM. Today is Monday and it was 78 in AZ. So in less than a week we spanned 100 degrees.

Over thinking is my jam I think lol Ok, thanks. Comfy clothes and non slip shoes. My mouth has profanity but not my clothes :D I live in my flip flops but I can give them up during my work hours. The only midriff shirts I have are the ones that I "outgrew" :D Thanks! As for variety, I have backpacked the John Muir trail (4 weeks in the back country) and most of the Pacific Crest Trail...I have layering down to a science. Drive safe.

PackRat's Comment
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Don't worry about the necessity of dressing up for any customer. I have seen drivers wearing everything short of only a bathrobe. Sadly, it's likely only a matter of time before I witness that, too. Some drivers out here look worse than destitute homeless folks.

Vicki M.'s Comment
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Don't worry about the necessity of dressing up for any customer. I have seen drivers wearing everything short of only a bathrobe. Sadly, it's likely only a matter of time before I witness that, too. Some drivers out here look worse than destitute homeless folks.

Fortunately (or maybe unfortunately) I have been in middle management in a high end casino for many years. Even though I know you dress for your job, the thought of dealing with a customer in anything less than at least neat, clean clothes would drive me out of my mind lol I will leave the suits at home. If I ever put another one on, it'll be too soon! f

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
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Gender neutral, of course!

rofl-3.gif sorry.gif rofl-3.gif

Deb R.'s Comment
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I wear jeans and t-shirts, with a fleece jacket that I can use as needed, and a waterproof windbreaker, tennis shoes or hiking shoes. That's it, unless it's super cold and I need a winter jacket. I sometimes wear sweatpants in the truck, but found that I feel too "sloppy" if I wear them outside of the truck.

Deb R.'s Comment
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Oh yeah, I also have a pair of waterproof boots (Bogs) that have saved the day more than once!

Monika D.'s Comment
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I liked to drive with jeans & steel-toed boots when I was OTR. You never quite know what you're going to run into, so I wanted to have that extra measure of safety, but it's also important to be comfortable. When it was time to drive, I changed into jeans, boots, and I had a bunch of plain men's t-shirts, like the kind you buy in packs. I think when you're a female driver there's another level of scrutiny, so I wanted to look a little more professional. And because I was living and working in one space, I wanted to differentiate between working hours and off-hours, but that was my preference. As you get more comfortable, you'll figure out what works best for you. Now I have a local job and I wear tennis shoes and yoga pants because I'm dropping and hooking all night lol

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

I liked to drive with jeans & steel-toed boots when I was OTR. You never quite know what you're going to run into, so I wanted to have that extra measure of safety, but it's also important to be comfortable. When it was time to drive, I changed into jeans, boots, and I had a bunch of plain men's t-shirts, like the kind you buy in packs. I think when you're a female driver there's another level of scrutiny, so I wanted to look a little more professional. And because I was living and working in one space, I wanted to differentiate between working hours and off-hours, but that was my preference. As you get more comfortable, you'll figure out what works best for you. Now I have a local job and I wear tennis shoes and yoga pants because I'm dropping and hooking all night lol

Wow, GREAT to see YOU around again, Monika!!

Hecka kudos on the local job!! I still wear boots when driving/riding w/my hubby; just my choice. The darn Ohio weather can rear it's ugly head at the most inopportune times, haha! Rain (and mud) at truckstops have retired a pair or three of tennies, haha! We do nights also...intrastate/local. Nice, isn't it? :)

Stop in the 'general' discussion sometime(s) and chat with usn's!!!

~ Anne ~

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Intrastate:

The act of purchasers and sellers transacting business while keeping all transactions in a single state, without crossing state lines to do so.

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