Am I Lazy For Not Wanting To Do Local And/or Dedicated?

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Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

I read a lot on here about what is entailed in doing local. I also see a lot of new folks like myself coming in, but unlike myself seeking to do local and or dedicated (If dedicated is what I think it is - Walmart and Dollar General and such). From what Ive gathered, it seems like its very long hours, very hard physical work and very demanding in skills, both in backing and negotiating traffic and obstacles.

Ive done backbreaking labor that requires precision and skills in a very dangerous environment followed by usually several hours of paperwork, phone calls and emails after. Its exactly what I want to get away from, not that I think OTR would be less in paperwork, communication and skills, but from a noobs perspective, it seems like it would be less taxing and foster success better than local. I dont understand the pull towards local for many I guess.

Like the old adage of being lonely in a room full of people, working 12 to 14 hours a day doing doing high stakes work can makes you not really home when you are at your home.

Im certainly not knocking down anyones choices, I just dont understand the appeal. Also, this may sound like a really ignorant question, But is regional more like OTR? (I assumed it was, but i could be way off base) and is Dedicated more like local? (I dont really want to be delivering to stores and retail places until I have the skills and preparation to do so, if at all)

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

I read a lot on here about what is entailed in doing local. I also see a lot of new folks like myself coming in, but unlike myself seeking to do local and or dedicated (If dedicated is what I think it is - Walmart and Dollar General and such). From what Ive gathered, it seems like its very long hours, very hard physical work and very demanding in skills, both in backing and negotiating traffic and obstacles.

Ive done backbreaking labor that requires precision and skills in a very dangerous environment followed by usually several hours of paperwork, phone calls and emails after. Its exactly what I want to get away from, not that I think OTR would be less in paperwork, communication and skills, but from a noobs perspective, it seems like it would be less taxing and foster success better than local. I dont understand the pull towards local for many I guess.

Like the old adage of being lonely in a room full of people, working 12 to 14 hours a day doing doing high stakes work can makes you not really home when you are at your home.

Im certainly not knocking down anyones choices, I just dont understand the appeal. Also, this may sound like a really ignorant question, But is regional more like OTR? (I assumed it was, but i could be way off base) and is Dedicated more like local? (I dont really want to be delivering to stores and retail places until I have the skills and preparation to do so, if at all)

Read comments, threads, and posts by Don. He started with CFI, and went 'regional.' Per se. The terminology is odd. My hubby works with Don. Mostly running in Ohio, and not a 'designated' route. Sometimes into NY or PA; yet home base is Ohio. Doubt either my dude or Don goes to the same place the same way week after week.. pretty sure, they don't.

Terminology on this is 'loose' for the most part. I get the 'home/not' adage. Sometimes I wonder if my guy shouldn't go back OTR until next year, when I can spread my wings. He likes his own bed, however. Home 10 hours, 12 when he brings the truck home. Off weekends. Guess we are fine, then~! LoL.

Read Rob T.'s diaries. . . and Papa Pig . . . much ado about regional/local/dedicated, for sure! Old School had 'similarity' in his routes for quite some time with Knight/Hydro/Sapa . . . . (and then, he showed them how awesome he was...and he'd run almost anything, by choice, not chance!)

Regional/OTR are usually one in the same...as I see it. I'm not a driver. Dedicated 'can be' like local, but ..then again, NOT... always. Look up Susan D.'s posts. She was (is?) Dedicated.. yet DEFINITELY not local. These terms need rewritten overall, imho.. but . . . i'm jut the wife, haha!

IMHO .. the only 'GUARANTEE' of being home nightly, is a driving job with a daycab. << And, not always!

Best to you.

Example: For your viewing pleasure . . .

So MANY. Keep reading!

~ Anne ~

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

Why would someone want to start out local?

1- more home time. They might have a new family or a child on the way.

2- Some people crave seeing their friends and family regularly. They might get depressed being away from home for so long.

3- Some people like a routine and knowing exactly what they are going to be doing, and for how long everyday.

4- They might have obligations that make OTR impossible: caring for a sick family member, for example

I know you emphasized the fact that you're not knocking anyone for making that choice. I'm not criticizing you for wondering why people make the choice. These are just some examples you may not have considered😁

Paperwork is a very small part of the job. No need to worry about that.

Yes. The benefit of OTR is that it enables you to develop your skills and good, safe habits.

Regional is very similar to OTR in most cases. Although instead of traveling all over the country, you will do all of your loads in one region. A region can be 500 miles or more in every direction. Most require you to stay out for weeks at a time. The benefit to staying in one region is that you become more familiar with routes you drive and the customers you serve on a regular basis. Plus, you are closer to your home, making it easier to get home more frequently.

Dedicated simply means you do loads for the same customer all the time. Often it means more local type routes. But if your customer has a dedicated route to a receiver 2,000 miles away, you are going to be driving 2,000 miles.

Someone else might be able to fill you in better on this dedicated stuff. Mine is just a basic explanation.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

I can't speak terribly well to what regional entails, but local is... basically like OTR , but only the beginning and end of an OTR trip.

I can't and won't speak for anyone else so -- my motivation for going local is it was the only path I saw that would enable me to return to college. I've done this long enough to know its necessity, and I think nothing less of those who want to retire doing this, but I never planned on this being the entirety of my working life.

I honestly miss the joy of waking up, refilling my coffee and brushing my teeth then hitting the road before the sun's up anywhere in the country. If for whatever reason school doesn't work out I'll be giving up my local position basically as soon as that becomes evident.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I read a lot on here about what is entailed in doing local. I also see a lot of new folks like myself coming in, but unlike myself seeking to do local and or dedicated (If dedicated is what I think it is - Walmart and Dollar General and such). From what Ive gathered, it seems like its very long hours, very hard physical work and very demanding in skills, both in backing and negotiating traffic and obstacles.

Ive done backbreaking labor that requires precision and skills in a very dangerous environment followed by usually several hours of paperwork, phone calls and emails after. Its exactly what I want to get away from, not that I think OTR would be less in paperwork, communication and skills, but from a noobs perspective, it seems like it would be less taxing and foster success better than local. I dont understand the pull towards local for many I guess.

Like the old adage of being lonely in a room full of people, working 12 to 14 hours a day doing doing high stakes work can makes you not really home when you are at your home.

Im certainly not knocking down anyones choices, I just dont understand the appeal. Also, this may sound like a really ignorant question, But is regional more like OTR? (I assumed it was, but i could be way off base) and is Dedicated more like local? (I dont really want to be delivering to stores and retail places until I have the skills and preparation to do so, if at all)

double-quotes-end.png

Read comments, threads, and posts by Don. He started with CFI, and went 'regional.' Per se. The terminology is odd. My hubby works with Don. Mostly running in Ohio, and not a 'designated' route. Sometimes into NY or PA; yet home base is Ohio. Doubt either my dude or Don goes to the same place the same way week after week.. pretty sure, they don't.

Terminology on this is 'loose' for the most part. I get the 'home/not' adage. Sometimes I wonder if my guy shouldn't go back OTR until next year, when I can spread my wings. He likes his own bed, however. Home 10 hours, 12 when he brings the truck home. Off weekends. Guess we are fine, then~! LoL.

Read Rob T.'s diaries. . . and Papa Pig . . . much ado about regional/local/dedicated, for sure! Old School had 'similarity' in his routes for quite some time with Knight/Hydro/Sapa . . . . (and then, he showed them how awesome he was...and he'd run almost anything, by choice, not chance!)

Regional/OTR are usually one in the same...as I see it. I'm not a driver. Dedicated 'can be' like local, but ..then again, NOT... always. Look up Susan D.'s posts. She was (is?) Dedicated.. yet DEFINITELY not local. These terms need rewritten overall, imho.. but . . . i'm jut the wife, haha!

IMHO .. the only 'GUARANTEE' of being home nightly, is a driving job with a daycab. << And, not always!

Best to you.

Example: For your viewing pleasure . . .

So MANY. Keep reading!

~ Anne ~

Im really torn in someways on CFI, I spoke for a couple of hours with the recruiter there. I really like the fact that they honor CCW permit holders and let us carry in their trucks. I also read just about every post on here I could find on them. But, Prime pays more (significantly), and thats one of my considerations right now, balanced with home time as I still have commitments here, CFI doesnt offer regional to CO residents, only OTR with minimum 21 days out. Prime has said home weekly (which I dont necessarily need, but its nice to have the option). Were considering a move to Missouri in the future, and at that point I would pursue CFI strongly.

I read Robs posts on local, Its fascinating and I definitely have tons of mad respect for him and everyone doing local. I definitely also dont want to do it after reading them lol. Same with the Walmart thread. After unloading many flatbed loads on various construction sites, both manually and with skylifts, forklifts and anything else we could use, I dont want to do that either at this point, maybe in the future though.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Zach 's Comment
member avatar

I wouldn't want to do local. Not becuase of the physical aspect but becuase I don't want to deal with multiple customers a day, all the backing, city driving etc that comes with local. Personally I didn't like regional , the schedules are alot tighter then OTR and the littlest things can set you back and make you late for you're appointment and sometimes you have multiple stops a day. Also atleast with Western Express you aren't home every 7-13 like they say you will be, they really don't like giving home time at all. That's just my opinion though, alot of drivers love doing regional

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

No! Not wanting to do local (by itself) does not make you lazy.

I owned and operated two (physically demanding) businesses prior to becoming a driver. So, I needed less physical work to allow my body to recover from twelve years of demanding labor. I’ve been a dry van driver for 6+ years.

DRIVE ON!

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hey Davy, I think you are smart for not wanting to start out as a local driver. Delivery jobs like that can be really tough on rookie drivers. I also think you are smart for not doing something like a Dollar Store dedicated account. Those jobs can be brutal. They pay well, but they certainly should!

There is confusion about what "dedicated" means. I have been a dedicated flatbed driver for years. What that means is that I am pulling loads for one particular customer. My customer happens to be the world's largest producer of aluminum extrusions (Hydro). They have something like 25 plants right here in the good ole U.S. of A., and I don't know how many in other countries. They are headquartered in Oslo, Norway.

I am still basically an Over The Road driver. I have made deliveries in almost every state in the lower 48. I think I have only not delivered to two of them. I am dedicated to their plant in Delhi, LA, but when they send me to some far off destination like Oregon, they will find me a back haul load from a plant that is nearby. For instance, in Oregon I will pick up a load at their plant in Portland, OR. If I go to Utah, I will pick up a load at their plant in Spanish Fork UT.

I often go to the Northeastern states. I have customers in Connecticut, Maine, Vermont, and upstate New York. There is a plant in Cressona, PA which will typically provide me with a back haul load from that area. If I go way down South to Miami, I will pick up from a couple of different locations in Florida. I may pick up some raw materials from the ports, or I may pick up a load from their plant in St. Augustine, FL. So, you can see I cover a lot of territory, just like an OTR driver. Dedicated is a broad term which covers a lot of different type of accounts. It isn't always a gig where you are responsible for unloading the truck. It will be doing work for one major customer.

The type loads I haul could never be off loaded by hand anyway. I just watch and wait while they do the work. I'm not lazy though - I'm quite the opposite!

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OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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