Brakes Just Caught On Fire And Burned Trailer.

Topic 30213 | Page 1

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Rad 's Comment
member avatar

Long story short. I’m a new inexperienced driver. I’m pushing a Mack truck automatic hauling 117,000+. It’s my second day. Everything has been going fine. But on my way home jusy now the trailer brakes caught on fire. I tried to put it out to no avail. I called the fire department and they put they tore out. Currently waiting to swap wheels out and head home. I police incident / accident report was taken. No ticket. I had pulled over to the side of the road immediately when I noticed the smoke. It was the brakes for sure. I was coming down a mountain using the maximum engine brake. I don’t know what I could have done different. I’m inexperienced. My question is this obviously will be on my dac report. Is my license tainted already. I’ve only driven for about a week now. I’m not sure if I’ll be fired when I get home. But if so, will anyone else take me on? How is this going to effect me ?

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm gonna jump in and only your employer can answer that question. It could be a termination or not, depends on their policy. If it goes on your record it will probably be hard to overcome but I couldn't say how hard.

What really gets me though, your second day and your hauling 117,000+ pounds? Damn, I figured you'd have to have experience before jumping into heavy hauling.

Regardless of what happens, count yourself fortunate, you didn't have to use an escape ramp and you lived to tell about it.

Rad 's Comment
member avatar

I just wanted to add. This was a routine 100 mile to and from run. Leaving a quarry, which is pretty hilly and curvy. I’m pretty sure I wasn’t using the brakes that much. But then again, I’m inexperienced I guess so I dunno. I’m not 100% what caused the fire but it definitely was not going out on its own and the fire extinguisher was not doin any justice.

Rad 's Comment
member avatar

2nd day,Mike. I notice they fill to capacity as well. It’s always 117,000+ ) 117,580 , 117, 680, 117,340) those are the numbers I see. I spoke to the manager he said it ok and stuff happens. That they would call me back. I don’t know how true or no that is. I’m kinda second guessing myself now. I’m not sure if it was a blown tire that got to the brakes, or maybe the weight and the heat today caused an issue. The inside rim looks like it was bent, like rolling on a flat maybe. My dad says maybe I didn’t push in the tractor trailer brake in all the way. Like I said I’m second guessing my self now. I definitely didn’t lose any air pressure em route. So I don’t know how this is gonna effect me. I really enjoy my license and like the job. It’s a sweet route. No benefits but they paying me 30$ an hour. I think that’s cool for the experience. I really do like the job hopefully I still have one. But yeah , I don’t know what happened, but would like to know and learn as much as I can from this. They say was going really well. Then the smoke came.

I'm gonna jump in and only your employer can answer that question. It could be a termination or not, depends on their policy. If it goes on your record it will probably be hard to overcome but I couldn't say how hard.

What really gets me though, your second day and your hauling 117,000+ pounds? Damn, I figured you'd have to have experience before jumping into heavy hauling.

Regardless of what happens, count yourself fortunate, you didn't have to use an escape ramp and you lived to tell about it.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Rad M.,

Sorry for your misfortune & I sure hope the guys at TTR aren't flaming you too bad, sincerely.

This is why, HERE at Trucking Truth, we recommend prospective drivers get their CDL through, and train/drive with, an OTR company; for at least the first year.

I'm not sure what your future holds, but we've got THIS link, that could help:

Apply For Truck Driving Jobs

Wish you the best~

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Junkyard Dog's Comment
member avatar

Can't imagine a company putting an inexperienced drive in that situation?

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

$30 per hour, no benefits, completely inexperienced, and hauling that kind of weight?

The risk vs reward would not be worth it for me.

Rad 's Comment
member avatar

I was really appreciative for the opportunity. I mean you have to start somewhere. I have a 5 year old son and don’t really want to be over the road and away from home. I did the route test the day before and all went well. I was pretty comfortable with the responsibility. It’s really not that bad. Heavy but manageable. I was going slow, using my mirrors, staying in the right lane, kept the engine brake on high and used the maximum breaking effect. Followed the protocols for the load. Dropped my extra axles on the road, I had them raised upon entering the yard. Pto was definitely off. I guess I’m going to find out in a day or so what happened with the brakes. It’s really unfortunate I was really on my way I felt and like I said, the smoke came. I got up there dropped a load of stone, picked up 117, 340 ( something like that I noticed they always fill to the max), went and got scaled and I was out of the yard. Maybe 15 minutes into the trip back to dump. I’m smoking. I pull over to the shoulder and the smoke just got worst. Then I saw flames and was like oh man 👀. I went and got the fire extinguisher. And things just got bad so I called 911 and then dispatch. I actually called dispatch when I pulled over first and was telling them I just pulled over because I see smoke. Then I just hung up and took matters into my own hands which didn’t really do much. Yeah feeling pretty disappointed. I really hope im not scarred for life behind this. I was given an incident report. Everyone was saying that my license would be ok. I dunno. Gonna remain positive. It was a great opportunity for me to get started, I really enjoyed it. We will see what happens next. I hope it’s ok sharing this on here, lol. Anyways thanks for your attention. God bless you all.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Rad 's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Anne, Yeah prime, western express , CR England. They all want to take me on. Not sure about now after this? I’m just not ready to be OTR. I enjoy being home on the weekends and in my bed every night. Respect to everyone that’s on the road .My son is 5 , we are playing baseball. This was like ideal as it gets and pretty enjoyable , as well. Definitely, have new found respect for the trucks. I have my hazmat and tanker endorsements. Imagine if that was a flammable tanker!! It would have been over. So I really want to know what the story is and just be better. I do understand the severity of all this. I’m sure they are looking at the tape and are inspecting the remains. They are fixing the trailer now and I guess will let me know the outcome of the entire event.

Rad M.,

Sorry for your misfortune & I sure hope the guys at TTR aren't flaming you too bad, sincerely.

This is why, HERE at Trucking Truth, we recommend prospective drivers get their CDL through, and train/drive with, an OTR company; for at least the first year.

I'm not sure what your future holds, but we've got THIS link, that could help:

Apply For Truck Driving Jobs

Wish you the best~

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks Anne, Yeah prime, western express , CR England. They all want to take me on. Not sure about now after this? I’m just not ready to be OTR. I enjoy being home on the weekends and in my bed every night. Respect to everyone that’s on the road .My son is 5 , we are playing baseball. This was like ideal as it gets and pretty enjoyable , as well. Definitely, have new found respect for the trucks. I have my hazmat and tanker endorsements. Imagine if that was a flammable tanker!! It would have been over. So I really want to know what the story is and just be better. I do understand the severity of all this. I’m sure they are looking at the tape and are inspecting the remains. They are fixing the trailer now and I guess will let me know the outcome of the entire event.

double-quotes-start.png

Rad M.,

Sorry for your misfortune & I sure hope the guys at TTR aren't flaming you too bad, sincerely.

This is why, HERE at Trucking Truth, we recommend prospective drivers get their CDL through, and train/drive with, an OTR company; for at least the first year.

I'm not sure what your future holds, but we've got THIS link, that could help:

Apply For Truck Driving Jobs

Wish you the best~

~ Anne ~

double-quotes-end.png

I hear ya, Rad. Our daughter was 3 and our son was born while Tom WAS driving OTR. Yes, they gave him ample time off, however.

I 'know' there are ways 'around' all the OTR stuff, but .. it comes with sacrifices; really ANY way you cut it!!!! Have you looked into 'Dock to Driver' programs, in your area? (Wish you'd post that location, as well!) Look at posts by Banks, for example. It's how he got into FedEx. Many LTL companies do this, also.

I'd type more, but my guy just got home... hopefully you'll give us an update when tomorrow comes!

That's trucking, in a nutshell. Wish the best, as always!

~ Anne ~

ps: ALL those interested companies are excellent, and I'd approach them in EXACTLY the order you listed.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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