Well, This Was Supposed To Be A Happy 'here's My Progress' Post.

Topic 30217 | Page 1

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Alex's Comment
member avatar

I was planning on making a post checking in with my progress so far over the past several months, but instead I'm having my first real issue with the company. I'm not even sure I'm looking for an answer or just need to rant a bit.

Supposedly, we're not forced dispatch. I was preplanned two loads the other day, a local run and the main one they're having me do. I accepted the longer one but declined the local run saying I didn't think I could make the 4 PM appt time based on how long it took to get unloaded at my stops last time I did this load. I also mentioned it would make me low on hours to get the other load there without having to stop somewhere for a reset.

The box for the reason for declining isn't very big so I also sent a message in with a little more info on why I couldn't make the appt and such. I then get a message back saying I'm being kept on both loads, and to let them know if I can't make the appt on time, which I already did when I declined it.

When I asked if they were getting the loads rescheduled or what the plan was, they'd already gone home for the day and night dispatch told me they thought that's what was happening but they weren't sure.

So, here I sit not knowing what the plan is for me, or if it will effect the hometime I have planned for next week as I've been out since Christmas.

To top it off my fleet manager is on vacation and the person covering for him will not talk on the phone about anything for any reason, instead sending vague answers over the qualcomm for anything you ask. Multiple people I've talked to have had the same communication issue with him and have been hung up on for not using the qualcomm, despite every other dispatcher being fine with either method.

A simple 'we're rescheduling both loads' or 'we need you to do this because there's no one else to cover it' would've sufficed.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Hi, Alex.

I appreciate your rant. I wish some of the 'pros' would chime in, but here's my 2 cents.

When my husband was OTR , he got dealt hands like that, often. The more he just 'rolled with it' per se, the easier it got. Refusing a load due to time constraints looks worse than you just saying "I can't make it there by x:00 but I can by y:00" .. et al.

Offer them a 'counter' solution.

Solve the problem, don't add one, or be one.

I'm just speaking from a trucker's wife's perspective, but I've learned a LOT being by his side (and often in the cab) for this many years.

IMHO, if you just 'make this happen,' late or not, and quit trying to holler to somebody about it all, you'll get your planned hometime. I remember those days like they were yesterday.

There's SO MANY anecdotes, but 'squeaky wheel gets the grease' is in reverse here, to me. The 'turning wheel gets the turns!'

Again, just IMHO.. .hope Old School etc chime in.

I wish you the best with this conundrum, and hope it works smoothly. Nobody likes the 'short ruin my day' loads, but ya know what? Everyone gets'em, and the more you'll be 'cool wit dat' in their eyes, the more they'll give you the more 'choice' loads.

I DO still see your point. Sit in the office seat for a day (I have!) and see it from their perspective, as well. Yes, most dispatchers could be 'better versed,' I agree.

~ Anne ~

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
IMHO, if you just 'make this happen,' late or not, and quit trying to holler to somebody about it all, you'll get your planned hometime.

Anne is quite right. Just do what they're asking. You can remind them about your home time, but keep doing what they ask. Veteran drivers typically schedule their home time a day or two in advance of when they really want it to take place.

They may be planning on T-calling that second load, but they aren't going to tell you until they have the arrangement all put together. Roll with it. Don't keep putting yourself later and later by waiting to hear from them. They've seen your communications and they've indicated they still need you to follow through. Get on with it!

Alex's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

IMHO, if you just 'make this happen,' late or not, and quit trying to holler to somebody about it all, you'll get your planned hometime.

double-quotes-end.png

Anne is quite right. Just do what they're asking. You can remind them about your home time, but keep doing what they ask. Veteran drivers typically schedule their home time a day or two in advance of when they really want it to take place.

They may be planning on T-calling that second load, but they aren't going to tell you until they have the arrangement all put together. Roll with it. Don't keep putting yourself later and later by waiting to hear from them. They've seen your communications and they've indicated they still need you to follow through. Get on with it!

I'd be more than happy to get on with it if I knew what was happening and was able to get this load where it needs to be. I was correct and had no way to make the appt, and know from previous experience they refuse late loads and make you leave and reschedule. I've yet to flat out say I'm not taking it, just that I couldn't make that appt time. As of right now I've sent in a second message today like they asked stating that I wasn't able to make it and it will have to be rescheduled and am waiting to hear what the plan is.

At this point there's nothing more I can do than wait to get an updated appt time.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Did you call the shipper/receiver yourself?

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Alex's Comment
member avatar

Did you call the shipper/receiver yourself?

At the time I was having issues with their website not loading to get the number from. They ended up taking me off that load because when dispatch finally got in touch with them tonight they were extremely rude to him on the phone. Can't say I'm too upset about it either, it was going to the king soopers dc in Denver. If you've ever been there you'll know why.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I've been to that place a few times. Not one of my favorites either.

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