A New Turn On My Winding Road

Topic 30520 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Andrey's Comment
member avatar

After driving local for three months I got fired. Well, personally I think that the company could keep me, but I respect their policies and decisions anyway, and I understand that insuring drivers is a complicated area. I am also grateful for the experience I accumulated over these months: my driving and especially backing skills significantly improved after making 10-15 deliveries/pickups every day in New England. Overall, it was a good company with good and hard working people. The two things I did wrong that terminated my employment was a broken mirror and a cracked plastic corner of a straight truck. I took off the mirror while backing to the door at the home terminal , it got caught by a yard horse's mirror parked next to me. So I was put into a straight truck for two weeks, and probably it was one of the low hanging branches, I cannot say for sure - touching/hitting tree branches is a common thing in residential areas, I noticed that cracked corner only when taking my post trip pictures. And next day I was terminated. I was upset because I liked everything - the job, the people, and the pay... Anyway, I started browsing craigslist and career websites again. It is hard, I need to tell you, to find a good job with only 6 months of experience and a poor safety record! Hard, but possible. Finally, I found a company that is willing to give another chance, it is a Western Express. They need a NE regional van driver, orientation is 2 days, then they assign a truck and I can start driving. Life is good!

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

Well that sucks! I'm glad you were able to find another company. You will find Western Express to a bit more forgiving in the accident policy...but try not to test them..lol. True, they may not pay as much as some others but they run newer equipment, give zero resistance when something needs fixed (encourage it actually) and have tons of miles available. Their health insurance is half the cost of my current company.When I left them they were in the process of changing pay for experienced drivers. I was dry van , about a month or two later they called me wanting me to come back and offered me $ .51 cpm. Had they offered that a few months before I left I'd probably still be there. I liked the company and had a great DM.

Just try not to pay attention to all the negative stuff you hear and remember...THEY GAVE YOU A CHANCE WHEN NO ONE ELSE WOULD.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

James H.'s Comment
member avatar

That seems kind of harsh, in that both accidents involved fairly minor damage to the company's equipment, not anything at a customer's location or with another motorist. They could, and maybe will, take care of the repairs without even notifying their insurer. Still, when one door closes, another opens. Keep the positive attitude and you'll be fine.

Moe's Comment
member avatar

Local companies are typically more harsh when it comes to accidents as they do not have much financial wiggle room as the larger carriers do. Ive known 2 drivers with my company that were let go from local companies, 1 for having one backing mishap and the other for not hitting production metrics during his first 3 months, they required so many loads a day or something like that.

They also can tend to be more political to work for, have to take that on a case by case basis though. Thats why going local straight out the gate is not the best idea.

Good luck Andrey, I hope WE works out for you

That seems kind of harsh, in that both accidents involved fairly minor damage to the company's equipment, not anything at a customer's location or with another motorist. They could, and maybe will, take care of the repairs without even notifying their insurer. Still, when one door closes, another opens. Keep the positive attitude and you'll be fine.

Andrey's Comment
member avatar

Just try not to pay attention to all the negative stuff you hear

I realized that something is wrong when I talked to 3-4 WE drivers at two local truck stops. Nobody had any big problems with the company. But if you go to youtube, it is just wow :-)

Mr. Curmudgeon's Comment
member avatar

<. But if you go to youtube, it is just wow :-)

Youtube is where the perpetually offended garner support for their self-declared victim status.

I also could not find work (private school on my own and a stale CDL). One outfit gave me a shot, and no one else would. I won't badmouth them to this day, i left after 13 or 14 months to go a different direction. They had a different business model than I wanted to work on, and that's okay. Taking the job with Western Express is your opportunity to continue to learn, to improve your skills, and prove to the company that you ride for the brand. Glad that you landed on your feet with a new outfit, good luck!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More