Starting Soon (been Lurking)

Topic 30764 | Page 1

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Deadman's Comment
member avatar

So im more or less just starting things, ive drove for amazon prime for a year, moved to fed-ex ground for another where i ended up being the guy that drove "the monster" aka the largest fed-ex delivery truck for my contractor. all with the plan to eventually get enough driving experience to get a OTR company interested in me... and now im finally sitting here with a date to start my CDL training. im happy to have finally gotten through it all. i know im coming in as a complete green horn, my expectation is i know ABSOLUTLY nothing and as far as anyone else is concerned im a complete idoit, but im still excited as hell.

TBH i did have a standing offer from another company when i finished with amazon but i felt like driving wise i was still to inexperienced to make the commitment. im already used to driving 12+ hours each day.

the only things that legit freak me out about jumping in a semi truck is i know NOTHING about manual unless its a motorcycle, and i know thats nothing compared to a semi.

backing up, and i understand that takes years of practice and everyone has bad days...

and big citys as i know how tight and complicated things can get in the north east aka citys designed before cars.

the company im with allows pet's once i get my own truck so planning on leaving my cat with my buddy tell then if he hopefully accept's her. aside from studying the manual whats some tips and heads up yall can give, i know this is a completly new monster that ive never dealt with before.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Sounds like you have a great attitude that will serve you well. Maybe the handle "DEADMAN" might not be the best. LOL.

I wanted to drive a manual transmission rig, but my company put me in an auto-mated rig and now I wouldn't want to go back. Go for auto if you can. It eliminates a complication and lets you focus on more important things like, please excuse this, like not becoming a dead man. Or hitting things with the truck.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Deadman's Comment
member avatar

Sounds like you have a great attitude that will serve you well. Maybe the handle "DEADMAN" might not be the best. LOL.

I wanted to drive a manual transmission rig, but my company put me in an auto-mated rig and now I wouldn't want to go back. Go for auto if you can. It eliminates a complication and lets you focus on more important things like, please excuse this, like not becoming a dead man. Or hitting things with the truck.

lol it's a OLD nickname i got from my father due to a knack of surviving sitation's unscaved that as a military vet and police officer of several decades dumbfounded him often. i would use my primary nickname but its... rather unique and right now tell im legit in a truck id rather try and keep off anyone's radar on who exactly i am.

sadly with the company im going with, i dont belive auto is a option, and im weird... even though i may never use em, my goal down the line is to get every endorsement i can.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hello Deadman! That feels awkward typing that, but whatever!

We're glad you are here. I've got a question about this statement...

with the company im going with, i dont belive auto is a option

That is highly unusual in today's climate. I am assuming you don't have a CDL yet, and are starting your career as an OTR driver. Most companies hiring rookie drivers are using the auto-shift transmissions.

I'm not trying to pry, but would you care to share with us where you are making this start? Practically the only companies that are still hanging on to the manual transmissions seem to be the LTL companies. Those are not really OTR jobs, and it makes me concerned that you are starting at a small company. That is fine if you think you have some connections or something like that, but for the most part we would typically encourage a newbie to avoid starting their trucking career at a small company for a host of reasons.

There's nothing wrong with making sure you don't have that automatic restriction on your license, but it is not that big a deal now days. I was just curious about where you are getting a start that will be using manual transmissions.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Deadman's Comment
member avatar

Hello Deadman! That feels awkward typing that, but whatever!

We're glad you are here. I've got a question about this statement...

double-quotes-start.png

with the company im going with, i dont belive auto is a option

double-quotes-end.png

That is highly unusual in today's climate. I am assuming you don't have a CDL yet, and are starting your career as an OTR driver. Most companies hiring rookie drivers are using the auto-shift transmissions.

I'm not trying to pry, but would you care to share with us where you are making this start? Practically the only companies that are still hanging on to the manual transmissions seem to be the LTL companies. Those are not really OTR jobs, and it makes me concerned that you are starting at a small company. That is fine if you think you have some connections or something like that, but for the most part we would typically encourage a newbie to avoid starting their trucking career at a small company for a host of reasons.

There's nothing wrong with making sure you don't have that automatic restriction on your license, but it is not that big a deal now days. I was just curious about where you are getting a start that will be using manual transmissions.

lol dont stress it, once im fully in i 100% plan on changing the name to my normal nick. im starting with prime, went with them knowing they have the extremly long training time. sorry i guese that i would automaticly be placed with a manual was a bad assumption comboed with info from a buddy that is with em.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Deadman!

I think it will be highly unlikely you would be issued a manual transmission truck at Prime. It is possible that you could be trained in a manual if you end up with a Lease/Operator as your trainer. It's just hard to say. I guess you could request being trained in a manual truck, but that might put an additional wait time on you for a trainer. That may be something you don't want to throw in the mix.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Deadman's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Deadman!

I think it will be highly unlikely you would be issued a manual transmission truck at Prime. It is possible that you could be trained in a manual if you end up with a Lease/Operator as your trainer. It's just hard to say. I guess you could request being trained in a manual truck, but that might put an additional wait time on you for a trainer. That may be something you don't want to throw in the mix.

honestly as someone just starting, thats somewhat of a relif. down the line, ya i do wanna learn the manual side, but as it was mentioned before, allows me to focus on other things.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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