Dipping My Toes In And The Water Seems Fine.

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Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

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I'm considering Swift and Prime, like plenty. Swift is in first place for now because I'd like to have a lot of terminals available. The rule is to stay with a company for at least a year and Swift's 2-year contract doesn't bother me at all.

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Two year contract? When did they start that?

They haven't. Unless Swift has changed it in the last couple months you have money withheld from each check for 1 year that pays your tuition. Should you decide to stay at Swift they will begin repaying you that same amount. After 2 years your school will have been completely free otherwise you're just financing it through them with no interest.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Derek "Fryode" Peavey's Comment
member avatar

I have no idea. Every video I've watched references a one year contract. Hence my apprehension about this subject.

If I attend Bridgerland Technical College in Logan, Utah to get my CDL , it's like $3000 and I'm not locked into any contract.

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I'm considering Swift and Prime, like plenty. Swift is in first place for now because I'd like to have a lot of terminals available. The rule is to stay with a company for at least a year and Swift's 2-year contract doesn't bother me at all.

double-quotes-end.png

Two year contract? When did they start that?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Chris K.'s Comment
member avatar

Ready Player One!

Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

I have no idea. Every video I've watched references a one year contract. Hence my apprehension about this subject.

If I attend Bridgerland Technical College in Logan, Utah to get my CDL , it's like $3000 and I'm not locked into any contract.

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I'm considering Swift and Prime, like plenty. Swift is in first place for now because I'd like to have a lot of terminals available. The rule is to stay with a company for at least a year and Swift's 2-year contract doesn't bother me at all.

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Two year contract? When did they start that?

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You can take this to the bank:

No company that offers company-sponsored training requires anything more than a 1-year commitment. Eagle Transportation in Tucson, AZ only asks for a 9-month commitment. Just something to think about.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Derek "Fryode" Peavey's Comment
member avatar

Hmm... fuel for thought.

I don't want to face feature indecision paralysis. That's awful.

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I have no idea. Every video I've watched references a one year contract. Hence my apprehension about this subject.

If I attend Bridgerland Technical College in Logan, Utah to get my CDL , it's like $3000 and I'm not locked into any contract.

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I'm considering Swift and Prime, like plenty. Swift is in first place for now because I'd like to have a lot of terminals available. The rule is to stay with a company for at least a year and Swift's 2-year contract doesn't bother me at all.

double-quotes-end.png

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Two year contract? When did they start that?

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

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You can take this to the bank:

No company that offers company-sponsored training requires anything more than a 1-year commitment. Eagle Transportation in Tucson, AZ only asks for a 9-month commitment. Just something to think about.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

You can take this to the bank:

No company that offers company-sponsored training requires anything more than a 1-year commitment.

And what am I supposed to do with it? Throw that inaccurate statement in the trash?

There are some companies that DO require more than 1 year. Most of the mega companies our members go to indeed require 12 months or less. However when i got my CDL sponsored by PFG I had a 12 month contract (now require 2 years), the local Sysco yard is 18 months just off the top of my head. Granted, those are local jobs so they're treated a bit different. You also have Steven's transport that does it different so I'll include a direct quote from here on TT that Brett put together

While Stevens Transport seems to have some advantages over other companies in some areas, there are some initial concerns we’d like to point out. Their CDL tuition repayment plan is a bit complex and somewhat deceiving. The Stevens Transport website indicates there is only a 1yr commitment and the recruiters we spoke with said the same. But upon further investigation, it appears the real commitment is 3 years.

The 1 year commitment only ensures the schooling will continue to be financed, but you will still need to make weekly payments to pay off the loan. This isn’t a free CDL program, rather, it is financed over the course of a 3 year period. Staying for 1 year will enable you to keep the tuition on an interest free loan. In addition to the tuition costs, if transportation and lodging is required, those costs will be placed on a separate interest free loan.

A majority of companies are 12 months or less but its very important you know the terms before signing. To be honest I wouldn't worry too much about the length of contract. I'd be more focused on things like how often can I get home? What areas do they run? What freight? If home weekends, is it just for a 34 or a full 48 hours?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Who's Todd? Every forum has "those" people. As in clowns who aren't funny. I appreciate the warning.

My Father's middle name is Todd. He's not a trucker, though. He writes website backend code. Shopping carts and such.

Thanks for the warm welcome, Anne! It means a lot to me.

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Annie, you shouldn't be bustin' tom's, "you know what's", callin' him the "Fat Guy" I LAMO seeing that twice now.....Bad Wifey ! lol

wtf.gif rofl-1.gif rofl-2.gif

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HAHAHAHAHA!

All in fun, StevoReno . . . (You 'may' be right, tho!!) LoL !!

~ Annie ~ << GOOD wifey!! :)

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Todd is working on his creative writing again.

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I think it's a different person.

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True, PackRat. You've got the 'best' Troll Spray out here, ... then again, time will reveal!

~ Anne ~

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Haya, Derek!

I'm dubbed "Welcome Mom" but Brett hasn't changed my tag yet... YOU'RE WELCOME! :) Stick around, D. We've been 'punked' on here, by Todd ... in 'your' vicinity. I usually 'bust him out' with my son's techie ... inclinations.

Welcome to TT and WELCOME TO TRUCKING!

~ Anne ~

ps: My son writes/edits code...has an IQ of 130... I'd rather he just played football instead of being a GENIUS, haha!

pps: Better to be a 'fryode' than a 'tryode' or 'dieode!' <<< My son's contribution, haha! (Yes .. I get it!)

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I have no idea. Every video I've watched references a one year contract. Hence my apprehension about this subject.

If I attend Bridgerland Technical College in Logan, Utah to get my CDL , it's like $3000 and I'm not locked into any contract.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I'm considering Swift and Prime, like plenty. Swift is in first place for now because I'd like to have a lot of terminals available. The rule is to stay with a company for at least a year and Swift's 2-year contract doesn't bother me at all.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Two year contract? When did they start that?

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

You can take this to the bank:

No company that offers company-sponsored training requires anything more than a 1-year commitment. Eagle Transportation in Tucson, AZ only asks for a 9-month commitment. Just something to think about.

Ummm..

Kerry, remember VERIHA ?!?!? We HAD this chat! ... 18 MONTHS.

Derek, true . . . but what 'I' WOULD DO before going to Bridgerton . . . is see 'WHOM' they partner with, for training!!

IE: TEK (Keller) in Ohio/Perrysburg area, partners with Trainco. Keller is on the top 10 fleets AGAIN in 2021. Not 'bashing' a private school, whatsoever. JUST SEE who they 'MAY' OR may not.. partner with. (Just IMHO!)

~ Anne ~

ps: OH, and . . . CRST. They DON'T lose! If you LEAVE before satisfaction... you'll go 'nowhere.' Yes, they've won. JRod who is a recruiter for G.O.E. (Greater Omaha Express) in Nebraska . . . has shared this with us multiple times.

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CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

You can take this to the bank:

No company that offers company-sponsored training requires anything more than a 1-year commitment.

double-quotes-end.png

And what am I supposed to do with it? Throw that inaccurate statement in the trash?

There are some companies that DO require more than 1 year. Most of the mega companies our members go to indeed require 12 months or less. However when i got my CDL sponsored by PFG I had a 12 month contract (now require 2 years), the local Sysco yard is 18 months just off the top of my head. Granted, those are local jobs so they're treated a bit different. You also have Steven's transport that does it different so I'll include a direct quote from here on TT that Brett put together

double-quotes-start.png

While Stevens Transport seems to have some advantages over other companies in some areas, there are some initial concerns we’d like to point out. Their CDL tuition repayment plan is a bit complex and somewhat deceiving. The Stevens Transport website indicates there is only a 1yr commitment and the recruiters we spoke with said the same. But upon further investigation, it appears the real commitment is 3 years.

The 1 year commitment only ensures the schooling will continue to be financed, but you will still need to make weekly payments to pay off the loan. This isn’t a free CDL program, rather, it is financed over the course of a 3 year period. Staying for 1 year will enable you to keep the tuition on an interest free loan. In addition to the tuition costs, if transportation and lodging is required, those costs will be placed on a separate interest free loan.

double-quotes-end.png

A majority of companies are 12 months or less but its very important you know the terms before signing. To be honest I wouldn't worry too much about the length of contract. I'd be more focused on things like how often can I get home? What areas do they run? What freight? If home weekends, is it just for a 34 or a full 48 hours?

Wish I'd read this through, before posting. SOOOO dang true. Wonder what kinda weekends G'Town has, nowadays?!?!?

Thanks, Rob T. >> always. Sorry to 'step' on ya. Dang CB isn't even ON, and I did it.. sry.

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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