Police Called At Consignee

Topic 31127 | Page 3

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Kerry L.'s Comment
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So, the short answer is basically to move the vehicle to a public location and then sort out the issue of where to go and how to do it once the vehicle is off private property.

This type of situation sounds like a good example of why it is important to manage one's clock well to try to avoid running into problems such as this. Of course, I can understand that sometimes life happens (traffic jams, detours, delays of other types, etc.) that can cause managing one's clock as planned to become an issue, but this type of problem should be a rarity, if I understand what I have read on this site. Do I have proper understanding here?

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Kerry,

I really SHOULD leave this one for the actual professionals; but let me take a 'stab' here. Perhaps the O/O (Landstar) guy didn't know if HE was a D & H until he got there, just like Mikey ... was not 100% on it.

Tom's had MANY loads that were all D&H in the QC, only to arrive at the consignee/receiver, and there are no empties. Ergo, becomes a live. Sooooo many factors involved. I'm kinda doubting time management was the biggest one; I could be wrong. PC is such a gray area, but the guys above (esp. Turtle) explained it well. Logs WILL sort it out. They have w/Tom, many times. Tom can't take the 16hr exempt because he brings the rig home 50% of the time. It wasn't 'at the yard' the 5 days prior. PC to home, even though there are T/stops on the way. He's day cab. Hotels? Plenty. Unladen? Always. It's so iffy.....but he ALWAYS LETS logs/safety know ASAP so they can document it as they wish. It's also in the notes, and in his DVIR...just to be sure sure! LoL.

Tom 'used' to be OTR , but the rules have changed SO much in the last 'since 2003' that heck . . . i missed the fuel island being okay for a 30, rule! Not saying he did/didn't fore & aft, but ... hehehe!

It happens more'n you think. The O/O guy should've been more 'cognizant' sooner, IMHO, but who knows what HIS BOL said, too.

Just my 2cents!

~ Anne ~

You are right. There are an infinite number of possibilities as to what could have happened to lead up to the issue in with that specific driver. It's not proper to suppose that the issue was a matter of time management. But, I did mention that even with sound time management, I recognize that things can happen to screw up a driver's sound planning. What I have read as a constant in the comments from the professionals here is communication is an absolute necessity. As I understand it, communication can take care of a potential problem and lack of communication can make a small problem a huge problem. One thing that I have learned from reading on this site is that communication is an essential part of doing the job of driving trucks.

Thanks for the feedback, Anne.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Mark O.'s Comment
member avatar

I have zero experience here, but thinking about driving. It seems to me like the moral of this story is always call ahead to the consignee to at least find out hours when they load. Does that seem right?

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Auggie69's Comment
member avatar

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To be fair to the landstar driver, he probably had to get approval from the company so that decision might not have been his to make.

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That's still no justification for refusing to leave a customer's property. If they want you gone, you have to go, approval or not.

Exit the private property when directed, then figure the rest out afterward.

Conversely, if you're locked in a door and you HAVE to leave and they won't release you, call the local PD and they will come and make sure you get on your way.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

I have zero experience here, but thinking about driving. It seems to me like the moral of this story is always call ahead to the consignee to at least find out hours when they load. Does that seem right?

Yes 100%. Also I typically call ahead to customers to ask if they allow overnight parking or if there’s room on the street. You can’t always tell from Google maps

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

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