Marten

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G-Town's Comment
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Congrats Donna!

TCB's Comment
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Congrats!! If my math is right, that's about 3144 miles in that pay period, very impressive. LOL, you want to stay east of the I-35 and I want to stay west of it, although I do live in Kalifornia. East of the I-35 seems about the cut off from wide open spaces to congested areas. But hey, if you drove 3144 miles in that part of the country, even more impressive. Are your dispatches with high miles? Marten seems to have nice equipment, and all of the tractors with APU. I am thinking of applying with Marten out of their Jurupa terminal. I would like to get something regional/dedicated, I-10/I-20 corridor, and stay west of the I-35. I guess that is asking for much. Good luck, and keep us updated.

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Michael runs quite a few loads out of Jurupa area, most of them his have gone to Utah. This past week he's taken loads from the Jurupa area to Nestle, WalMart, and Michael's Stores. He is on a dedicated Nestle accounts and pulls a refer even when taking a load for Michael's Stores. If you contact me through bio, I can give you Michael's contact info, if you want. Sometimes he has longer loads to Oregon and southern Washington. He is not required to chain, they will leave it up to him to chose another route or sit and get paid inclement weather pay if no other route is available, though that might vary by fleet. Since we have room on our farm, he brings his truck home when on break after working 12 days.

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Congrats!! If my math is right, that's about 3144 miles in that pay period, very impressive. LOL, you want to stay east of the I-35 and I want to stay west of it, although I do live in Kalifornia. East of the I-35 seems about the cut off from wide open spaces to congested areas. But hey, if you drove 3144 miles in that part of the country, even more impressive. Are your dispatches with high miles? Marten seems to have nice equipment, and all of the tractors with APU. I am thinking of applying with Marten out of their Jurupa terminal. I would like to get something regional/dedicated, I-10/I-20 corridor, and stay west of the I-35. I guess that is asking for much. Good luck, and keep us updated.

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Michael runs quite a few loads out of Jurupa area, most of them his have gone to Utah. This past week he's taken loads from the Jurupa area to Nestle, WalMart, and Michael's Stores. He is on a dedicated Nestle accounts and pulls a refer even when taking a load for Michael's Stores. If you contact me through bio, I can give you Michael's contact info, if you want. Sometimes he has longer loads to Oregon and southern Washington. He is not required to chain, they will leave it up to him to chose another route or sit and get paid inclement weather pay if no other route is available, though that might vary by fleet. Since we have room on our farm, he brings his truck home when on break after working 12 days.

Hi Harvey, I would be interested in speaking with Michael. I am filling out a Marten application right now and could use him as a referral. I tried to contact you on your bio, but it's not working. When I clink on social link, it only refreshes the page. I must be doing something wrong. I spoke with the recruiter. He said that they mostly do reefer , but do have dry van routes. I prefer dry van, but would consider reefer. I just hate doing mostly live loads and unloads. I would be based out of Jurupa. Thanks.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Harvey C.'s Comment
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Michael runs quite a few loads out of Jurupa area, most of them his have gone to Utah. This past week he's taken loads from the Jurupa area to Nestle, WalMart, and Michael's Stores. He is on a dedicated Nestle accounts and pulls a refer even when taking a load for Michael's Stores. If you contact me through bio, I can give you Michael's contact info, if you want. Sometimes he has longer loads to Oregon and southern Washington. He is not required to chain, they will leave it up to him to chose another route or sit and get paid inclement weather pay if no other route is available, though that might vary by fleet. Since we have room on our farm, he brings his truck home when on break after working 12 days.

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Congrats!! If my math is right, that's about 3144 miles in that pay period, very impressive. LOL, you want to stay east of the I-35 and I want to stay west of it, although I do live in Kalifornia. East of the I-35 seems about the cut off from wide open spaces to congested areas. But hey, if you drove 3144 miles in that part of the country, even more impressive. Are your dispatches with high miles? Marten seems to have nice equipment, and all of the tractors with APU. I am thinking of applying with Marten out of their Jurupa terminal. I would like to get something regional/dedicated, I-10/I-20 corridor, and stay west of the I-35. I guess that is asking for much. Good luck, and keep us updated.

double-quotes-end.png

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Michael runs quite a few loads out of Jurupa area, most of them his have gone to Utah. This past week he's taken loads from the Jurupa area to Nestle, WalMart, and Michael's Stores. He is on a dedicated Nestle accounts and pulls a refer even when taking a load for Michael's Stores. If you contact me through bio, I can give you Michael's contact info, if you want. Sometimes he has longer loads to Oregon and southern Washington. He is not required to chain, they will leave it up to him to chose another route or sit and get paid inclement weather pay if no other route is available, though that might vary by fleet. Since we have room on our farm, he brings his truck home when on break after working 12 days.

double-quotes-end.png

Hi Harvey, I would be interested in speaking with Michael. I am filling out a Marten application right now and could use him as a referral. I tried to contact you on your bio, but it's not working. When I clink on social link, it only refreshes the page. I must be doing something wrong. I spoke with the recruiter. He said that they mostly do reefer , but do have dry van routes. I prefer dry van, but would consider reefer. I just hate doing mostly live loads and unloads. I would be based out of Jurupa. Thanks.

Sorry, I had put it in my Social link in my profile and the email address shows up if you hover your mouse over it but I've added it to my bio as well now.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Donna M.'s Comment
member avatar

I run reefer , most everything is drop and hook. Today up in Wisconsin, running Walmart stores drop the full one get the mt out the door and go again. Last week I ran from Florida to Minnesota, Minnesota to Texas. For guarantee pay you are only required to run five days a week. However if you manage your clock and run 7 days it’s a extra .10 cents on the mile.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

PackRat's Comment
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Whoa! That's some serious-good incentive money there! I may start taking a more serious look at them, too. I just have very little desire to pull (and sit on) refer loads.

Davy A.'s Comment
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So I went with marten! Theee weeks now and it’s different! Three day orientation they pay for rental car, motel, breakfast and lunch. First check 1000$ for orientation or sign on! Since I had only done one year otr and two years SE region, I wanted more area so I choose a gulf coast region, from I-35 to east coast. This region comes with a guarantee pay of 1350$ per week. Marten is not a training company, they have a point system for accidents and the first year it’s x3 second year x2 . They use workflow through the qc for paper work now this was difficult for me to catch on to. The trucks are equipped with scanners to send paperwork in. Loads are 99% drop and hook; however if there is a live load detention starts upon arrival and is paid on that weeks check. There is always a load and a preplan on the board, weekends will be several preplan. In 3 weeks I have not waited one hour on a load. I have enclosed my paycheck for last week, it does have a 300$ bonus for Christmas, even tho I had only been here 3 weeks. Anyone thinking about marten let me know I’d be glad to share more!

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That Gulf coast region, will that keep you south? I'd like something that is just southern freight. Ive done it all summer, the heat and humidity don't bother me.

Rapidly getting to the point that I'm ready to leave my current since they continue to send us directly into hazardous weather, even more so when we are already down south. It's almost impossible to get freight out of my terminal south of I40

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Harvey C.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

So I went with marten! Theee weeks now and it’s different! Three day orientation they pay for rental car, motel, breakfast and lunch. First check 1000$ for orientation or sign on! Since I had only done one year otr and two years SE region, I wanted more area so I choose a gulf coast region, from I-35 to east coast. This region comes with a guarantee pay of 1350$ per week. Marten is not a training company, they have a point system for accidents and the first year it’s x3 second year x2 . They use workflow through the qc for paper work now this was difficult for me to catch on to. The trucks are equipped with scanners to send paperwork in. Loads are 99% drop and hook; however if there is a live load detention starts upon arrival and is paid on that weeks check. There is always a load and a preplan on the board, weekends will be several preplan. In 3 weeks I have not waited one hour on a load. I have enclosed my paycheck for last week, it does have a 300$ bonus for Christmas, even tho I had only been here 3 weeks. Anyone thinking about marten let me know I’d be glad to share more!

0748922001641397103.jpg

double-quotes-end.png

That Gulf coast region, will that keep you south? I'd like something that is just southern freight. Ive done it all summer, the heat and humidity don't bother me.

Rapidly getting to the point that I'm ready to leave my current since they continue to send us directly into hazardous weather, even more so when we are already down south. It's almost impossible to get freight out of my terminal south of I40

Davy, Marten will not send you into hazardous weather. I can't say 100% for sure this pertains to all fleets but I think it's a company policy. Michael says he can only use chains to get out of a situation but if chains are required, he can't drive into that area, only put them on if chains became a requirement afterwards. Today he called to say he might be home a day late as Donner Pass (I-80) had minimum chain requirements (R1). They were going to route him south on 95 which would have been a long detour but then chain requirements got lifted and he came over the pass. His worse condition so far was a icy truck stop where a lot of trucks had to get towed out one morning in Utah last week but roads were clear.

If Michael needs to park due to bad weather, he gets paid $250 inclement weather pay. He once got paid the $250 for bad rain even though he was able to drive, but don't know if that was a mistake or what. He also gets paid his guaranteed weekly minimum pay in event of a breakdown (his second week with Marten back last April his transmission was out, he worked 1.5 days that week and got paid his guaranteed minimum).

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

It's not that we get forced to run in bad weather, we can shut down and get paid as well as turn down a load.

The problem is that I can make more money and enjoy it more when I'm consistently running, which I can do in the south. This why I'm wondering if the have a strictly South East to west region. Probably a longshot but it would be nice.

Harvey C.'s Comment
member avatar

It's not that we get forced to run in bad weather, we can shut down and get paid as well as turn down a load.

The problem is that I can make more money and enjoy it more when I'm consistently running, which I can do in the south. This why I'm wondering if the have a strictly South East to west region. Probably a longshot but it would be nice.

Michael shut down once and his DM later told him he didn't have to, he can decide himself to take a longer route to avoid chain requirements. He has gotten more miles at least a few times, driving from Salt Lake City to Stockton via Las Vegas instead of I-80, so he gets more miles and keeps driving. I'm just explaining the Marten policy. Donna would know more about dedicated southern routes.

I know you've liked your KW T-680 and that is all Michael has driven except for the one time when his transmission had problems and they had him bring a Peterbilt bobtailed to their yard from the place they had it repaired at. It seems they mostly have Kenworths, though I saw a few Freighliner day cabs in the Stockton yard.

One thing that hasn't been mentioned is that Marten gets 17 CPM of his pay as per diem. I think I've read posts on here where some drivers don't like that but I think that's a mistake. Michael will be better off investing his income tax savings himself for retirement than having higher Social Security taxes (and income taxes) taken out of paycheck. Marten saves money for sure, but it's a benefit to the employee, IMO.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

Robert K.'s Comment
member avatar

I run reefer , most everything is drop and hook. Today up in Wisconsin, running Walmart stores drop the full one get the mt out the door and go again. Last week I ran from Florida to Minnesota, Minnesota to Texas. For guarantee pay you are only required to run five days a week. However if you manage your clock and run 7 days it’s a extra .10 cents on the mile.

how do you like this company? I noticed that you got good payday. how is their training is like? is it paid training like prime that students get pay while working with trainer? Do you need Hazmat endorsement to work for them?

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

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