Veriha VIP Academy Training

Topic 31458 | Page 1

Page 1 of 4 Next Page Go To Page:
Bill M.'s Comment
member avatar

Day 1 training: Before starting my training, I wanted to check out the Green Bay area, and famous Lambeau field. So, I left for training on Saturday, and stayed in a hotel in Green Bay. Sunday, I visited Lambeau field. I must admit, it was a bit underwhelming. Probably because of the mystique built up over the years through television and their storied history. Still, cool to see.

Late Sunday morning, I arrived in Marinette WI. On my way to the hotel, I drove to Veriha headquarters where I will spend the next several weeks training. From there, I drove to the Veriha-owned, 20 room, double occupancy extended stay hotel, about a 5 minute drive. They purchased the hotel two years ago to house trainees and drivers. The hotel sits across the road from the Menominee river. Famed for its world class walleye and smallmouth bass fishing, it has me wishing I would have scheduled my training during the spring pre-spawn or spawn season. Lol. But that’s not why I’m here.

Orientation started at 0700 today. Eight of us reported for training. I really don’t know why anyone else selected Veriha as their company of choice, but for me it started with the recruiting and their online presence. From the start, there was a perceived and real continuity within the company. Their words are congruent with their actions every step of the way, from recruitment to enrollment. Everyone at Veriha is very welcoming, good at what they do and efficient. I really do get the sense that they are heavily invested in recruiting and retaining quality drivers to their company. Veriha runs small class sizes. Ours is a 1:2-3 trainer/student ratio. But, like JustG said in his training diary: they emphasize safety, and the fact that their goal is to train you to pass your CDL exam on the first try; if they don't think you're ready, they won't even send you. They are very up front about that.

The first hour or so today was dedicated to HR activities – nothing noteworthy to report there. After that, we left the administrative building and headed over to the training building where we will spend the next two weeks. The first few hours were dedicated to slide deck presentations on pre-trip inspections safety. After that, we headed outside for hands-on pre-trip inspections. The instructors broke us up into two groups of four and went over the inspection from front to back, top-to-bottom. So, here we are, standing in snow covered Wisconsin, one state short of snow-covered scenic Canada, looking at a tractor trailer. SMH

Our class is made up of people from all over, one guy even drove in from Georgia. Most everyone else except for me, traveled four hours or less to get here. Georgia, he drove >1100 miles. We learned a lot of information in a short amount of time. I’m not sure what I would be thinking if I did not have some prior experience, even if it was over 30 years ago. We have a lot of homework, a lot. I know a few of my classmates expressed feeling a little overwhelmed by all the information we were exposed to today.

If you’ve read my first post on TT titled “Returning to my Roots,” you’ll understand when I say I can’t believe I’m here, but I'm happy to be here. I can’t believe I’m on my way to earning my CDL. This is what I'm choosing to do with my life until I fully retire. I put a lot of research into this decision. Almost three months passed from the time I started looking into becoming a truck driver, researching, and selecting a company that offers paid training, and getting hired by that company. Trucking truth has been a tremendous resource to me. Without TT, my decisions would not have been as well-informed.

For today, signing off. I'm looking forward to the 0730 start tomorrow, pre-trip inspections, and some backing maneuvers, maybe. Hopefully I’ll be able to stay motivated to keep updating this journal. We'll see.

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Dennis L's Comment
member avatar

Hey Bill, great start to your diary. I’ll be following.

Wow, only 8 students vs 160 here at Prime and you already jumped right into it on the first day. Good Luck.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Bill M.'s Comment
member avatar

Day 2:

Day two involved straight line backing and practicing PTI...all day. By the afternoon we we all had one chance offset back. Aside from that, not much else went on. The instructors are very safety conscious. I can tell they care and want us to succeed. Also, I can see they will not send any of us for our exam at any time, if they don't think we are ready.

Day 3: Today, February 9 - we started the morning with PTI for one hour, then straight-line and offset backing. Straight-line backing is pretty simple. I picked up on it quickly. Offset backing was a little different. On my first attempt at offset it took me two pull-ups to get in the box. On my second attempt, I made it in one-shot, no pull-ups. I was really happy about that, but didn't let it go to my head. I had another one-shot going but felt I was a little to close to the cones on my blindside, so I made a short pull up to get straight. The instructor told me I had it if I would have kept on the path I was on. Anyway, I don't want to get to overconfident, but I'm feeling pretty good about where I'm at with that.

After one hour of backing. The instructors took us out on some side roads that were not very busy at all. Each of us got to drive for about 30 minutes each. Plenty of right and left turns, stops and intersections. Everyone did pretty well. I was really excited about this, it brought back fond memories of the late 80s. I really feel at home behind the wheel of a semitruck.

After driving, we returned to more PTI, and more backing. Then, more backing. Then, more PTI. Some are struggling more than others, but overall everyone is doing pretty good.

Weather has been mild for upper Wisconsin. Today was about 35 degrees. But, that's going to change. We'll be in single digits again by Friday. LOL. I really don't mind the cold weather as long as I have the right gear/clothing, which I do.

I'm impressed with our instructors and how they are providing us with all the information we need to be successful, while at the same time, they are allowing us to learn some things on our own through experience. They lover what they love what they're doing and they take a lot of pride in what they do. Tomorrow, more driving and backing is on the agenda.

So far, I'm very happy that I chose Veriha. I have trucking Truth to thank for that. I found Veroha, and Veriha found me through TT. Veriha is backing everything they told me on the phone and in emails with action to match their words. I feel I'm getting quality training that I need, and that they will let us know if we're not performing up to standards.

For the rest of the night I'll review my PTI and brake test procedures. That's all for today.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Bill M.'s Comment
member avatar

So, it's been a minute since I posted in my diary. After day 3, the internet was spotty for a couple of days, so I haven't posted in a while. That, and the fact that I was actually enjoying not being attached to a computer all day, every day.

The short and the skinny of my training in Marinette, Wisconsin. Except for one day, we never saw temperatures above about 23 degrees. Mostly, we were training in single-digit temps and less with the winds. Several <0 degrees to start the day. But I don't mind the weather, I really don't. Just dress for the occasion, and everything will be fine. In fact, I love being outside more than I do inside a building. Everyone in my class was from Wisconsin or Michigan. One of my fellow students told me how much colder 10 degrees is in Michigan and Wisconsin than it is in PA. OK! Often, I found myself outside of the cab in the chilly early mornings practicing PTI. Everyone else? They were sitting in the tractor cab practicing in-cab PTI sheltered and protected from the elements. It's fine, I mean, use it if you got it, right? Then there's right clothing, right equipment, right mindset. But I've been accused of doing things the hard way before.

On Wednesday of week two, we were mock tested for PTI; two students failed and had to retake the test Friday of the same week. My roommate was one of those having to retest. It was no surprise to me. Every night I would review my pre-trip inspection notes. Every night he would ask me, "are you reading those notes again?" I would just look over at him and ask, "aren't you?" His response was no, I'll study the night before we're tested, I'll be fine. I said, well, I'm 55, you're 28, maybe you can do that, but I can't. After failing his PTI test, he told me he didn't take it seriously enough. He should have done what I did. Hmm, ya don't say, I said, followed by "don't be so hard on yourself, they told us not to put it off until the last minute, or we'll be sorry we did." We both laughed at that. It was a good wake-up call that I think he learned from.

I don't usually give advice to anyone. But, I do have some recommendations for those who are thinking about truck driving as a career, heck, regardless of what you plan on doing in life: show up ready to work; be prepared to learn; be prepared to contribute; expect to make mistakes and be willing to learn from them; be prepared to be challenged; be ready to get knocked down and get back up again; show-up with a good attitude (it will determine your altitude); be grateful for the opportunity. If you can do those things, you'll do well no matter where you are in life.

Anyway, driving and backing went well most days. Some people had more trouble than others. If I wasn't one-shotting all of my backups, I was getting them within two pull-ups from day two of backing practice. But a strange thing happened, towards the end, even though I was patient during backing, I was having trouble with the 90s, doing 2 pull-ups every time. Nothing was terrible, just a little too tight one way or the other.

By Wednesday of the second week, the trainers said they felt I was ready to be tested the following week. They said they wanted me and one other student to test on Wednesday of the next week if I was ok with that. I felt confident I would be ready, so I agreed. I have to admit, I was confident in my abilities but a little nervous. I'd only been here for 10 days, and in 7 more, I'll be testing for my CDL. At this point, the trainers had done all they could do to help us. The rest was on you; they can't drive the test for you.

So, I invested most of my time rehearsing PTI in-person and visualizing it in my head. I would rehearse a complete PTI of the tractor and trailer, from top to bottom, inside and out, in-person, and in my mind, at least 3 times per day. Sometimes five times. Visualizing is a technique that has served me well over the years in sports competitions and other activities. Then, when I was driving different routes with the instructors, I approached every drive as if it were my first; cautious, slow, and smooth on the throttle and brakes. Every time I got behind the wheel, I felt like I belonged there. Like I should have been here a long time ago.

But I'm here now. Tomorrow, I head out with my trainer for the first time. I'm excited to get going and can't help but wonder what my Uncle John might say if he were here today. He had a way of speaking as few words as possible to get his point across. One of his sayings that comes to mind is, "today is a good day. Tomorrow will be a better one."

Be safe out there!

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Great updates.....I'm there!

Bill M.'s Comment
member avatar

Thumb's up!

Great updates.....I'm there!

Dennis L's Comment
member avatar

I agree great updates. Good luck on road with your trainer.

Regarding PTI, my trainer said that I was his first student to get on his truck fully knowing my PTI. Keep up the hard work getting it down pat. Will save time later.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Bill M.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks. Sounds like you're doing a great job out there and that you're happy with your decision to become a commercial driver.

I agree great updates. Good luck on road with your trainer.

Regarding PTI, my trainer said that I was his first student to get on his truck fully knowing my PTI. Keep up the hard work getting it down pat. Will save time later.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Bill M.'s Comment
member avatar

Trainer said he had a 36" X 36" X 18" storage area for trainee personal items. Ny gear will fit in a 24" X 27" X 13". Most of it is necessities. But believe me, there's a lot in there. I'm used to traveling with the military. Lol The item on the top right is my sleeping bag which is not included in the measurements because it will be on the bunk.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Trainer said he had a 36" X 36" X 18" storage area for trainee personal items. Ny gear will fit in a 24" X 27" X 13". Most of it is necessities. But believe me, there's a lot in there. I'm used to traveling with the military. Lol The item on the top right is my sleeping bag which is not included in the measurements because it will be on the bunk.

Remember, when posting photos ... you have to hit the 'GO!' .. and then wait for it to say 'Success!' and then you'll see a thumbnail, right to the right in that upper box, as well as in your actual post!

I'm excited for you; following as well!

Try again?!?

~ Anne ~

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Page 1 of 4 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Veriha Trucking Choosing A Trucking Company Company Sponsored CDL Training Reports From CDL Training Truck Driving Orientation
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More