CDL Student College Of Dupage Addison Illinois

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Keith M.'s Comment
member avatar

Well this is the middle of the 5th week. Took the Hazmat training yesterday at the school. I am glad it is included in our CDL training. 3 of Us from class and 3 CDL holders. The class is required to test for the Hazmat endorsement in addition to getting your fingerprints at Identogo. One of the other 3 CDL holders was an O/O, one was leaving his current company and going with a tanker company(fuel) and the 3rd was a company driver who wanted his Hazmat. We all passed and got our Certificates.

So this week we have been practicing our SOS testing Pre-trip, A, B and C plus the SOS driving route. Since we have 3 Students and 3 Manual Trucks, 2 students go on the SOS route with an instructor and the other Student stays back and does the SOS testing. Then we switch, so glad only 3 Students. Another class starts on Monday with 8 students. We take our actual SOS test on Wednesday 3/9. Since only 3 students we have also been learning Alley docking setup to straight back and setup to the 45. Learning where and how to setup ie: Drivers door in the middle of the parking space, 4 feet from the from the space etc. The Marine already knows how to do the maneuvers since he was a driver in the Marines. So tomorrow (Friday) we will continue the SOS route and more alley docking. Practicing skills, Air Break portion and jack-knife parking plus Coupling and Uncoupling the trailer. Our instructors are so cool, they are teaching US more than just what we need to pass the SOS. Most schools don't teach you how to couple and uncouple, alley docking set up straight,45 and jack-knife parking. And we will have a manual endorsement on our CDL.

Monday we are going to do another Marathon (mock SOS) each will do the in-cab and air breaks, then form A, B or C. Then the road test. Plus more Alley docking and set up, 45 and setup. I am guessing the same for Tuesday plus Coupling and Uncoupling the trailer. Wednesday we test. Then we have Thursday and Friday to hone our Alley Docking and 45 and Jack-parking. We are also going to learn to float gears. Illinois requires you to double clutch so for the SOS we will double clutch. Floating gears is not using the clutch to switch gears, at the proper RPM let your foot of the gas pedal and switch gears.

So I am still looking for a Job from the recruiters that came I am interested in ABF $10,000 sign on bonus ( pay for my tuition) but a 3 yr promissory note. ABF is in Sauk Village about an Hour and 10 minutes Werner has 4-5 different openings with various pay and sign on bonus. Werner has no contract, they do have tuition reimbursement paid $200 a month on your pay check would take 24 months. Schneider has the same type of offering plus the tuition reimbursement and a 6 month contract. Schneider has 5 days classroom 7 Days on the road training( only day training) then 5 more days of class room then you get your own truck. Schneider is in Gary IN about 1.5 hrs. from Me. I like the 6 months with Schneider. Plus Amazon Freight is a possibility its 2 miles from me. $27 an hour 40 hrs in 3 day then the rest is overtime.

Anyone have any advice or ideas, I would greatly appreciate it.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Floating Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

Float Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Sounds like it's coming along WELL, Keith!

All the above sound really decent; I'd check with Werner, to make sure it's not a Dollar Store account, however. Those are not recommended for 1st year rookies; the backing challenges, physical wear & tear adds stress, and may set you up for 1st year failure. However, read Papa Pig's diaries; he made it work!

ABF ... to get into LTL that quick?? Sheesh, it'll TAKE 3 years to get on the 'better' board, anyway! Read some of Bobcat Bob and Banks' diaries. G'Town, as well. The drive is kinda long to your yard, though.

SNI sounds really good; We've got a LOT of SNI guys on here; search diaries by 'Schneider' tag. Amazon ... I don't know anyone firsthand that hauls for them. Others may chime in!

Keep on keeping on; read some of the guys' diaries I mentioned, as you have time.

Best wishes!

~ Anne ~

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Keith M.'s Comment
member avatar

Just started week 6. We do our SOS test on Wednesday. There was another round of students today 7 in total. So we were put in the room across form our "normal room" no big deal. Sent to the yard to pre-trip the 3 trucks, snowed overnight. Unplugged them did our pre trip and safe start. Time to warm up. We each did 1 SOS route then back to the yard for more skills. The 4 new students were learning forward and backing in 1 sleeper the other 3 in-cab and coupling the other sleeper. We 3 were doing our skills in the Day cab 2 in the cab and 1(lol) directing. I got called to the students doing forward and backing to show them the in-cab with air breaks. Went thru the in-cab and airbrakes with the new students. I have always been a trainer, I come from the restaurant business as a server trainer. So, I always train the new servers to the companies standards. It was very easy for me in that sense. Then back to the Mack for more skills. We took our lunch break then back to the yard. Us 3 did skills for about an hour and the new students back to the classroom for videos. 2 in 1 truck with 1 trainer for an SOS route and 1 of drive time and 1 student with the other trainer for SOS and more hours, he was behind 2 driving hrs. Back to the yard to post trip and plug the trucks in. Tomorrow is day 2 of our last week.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Keith M.'s Comment
member avatar

Well just finished week 6 at COD. We took our SOS skills test and Road Test on 3/9 All 3 of us passed. We are now truckers. Yesterday and Today. Did more simulated alley docking, 45 backing, floating gears. Today I was the only one of us to show. So I went on one our usual routes and drove floating gears with the instructor and 3 new students. Then 1 student Rudy drove the practice run double clutching , did excellent. Switched to 2nd student he practiced his double clutching around the industrial park then back to the yard for lunch. After lunch back the yard 1 new Student Rudy learned skills on the Mac, while I sat in the Automatic with another student Mike doing his pre-trip. The other Truck came back and picked him up. He then went in the truck with one of the instructors and 2 other students and I went in the Mack (day cab) we do our SOS skill and pre-trip on and Rudy stayed with me while I did simulation ally docking and 45. I had the truck for about 2 hrs. After 1 hour I let him do his skills. He did very well.

Then plugged the Trucks up. And I was done. So glad I chose COD. I felt I had 1-on-1 training. The instructors knew what your were doing wrong and were able to easily fix it and explain why and how. We were never given the pre-trip and told go learn it. They were there with us the whole time. I was going to go with Prime. Thank God I didn't.

In 6 wks I have 42 hours of drive time. Hazmat Training. Alley docking, 45 back and coupling and uncoupling. Plus I will get my tuition reimbursed.

I will have all endorsements and no restrictions.

Thank You to those that have read this and commented.

Hearts to All

Floating Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Delco Dave's Comment
member avatar

Congratulations!!!

dancing-banana.gif dancing-banana.gif dancing-banana.gif

I just finished week one of 6 with ABF. Not too far behind you. I would recommend at least interviewing with ABF if the terminal is close to you and your not able to start out OTR.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Keith wrote:

I was going to go with Prime. Thank God I didn't

You made the right choice for you, it worked. You did not experience Prime, KLLM or any of the other Paid CDL Training Programs. Yet you went out of your way more than once to basically bad-mouth them.

I’m glad your path worked for you. Really I am. However the negative editorial commentary was unnecessary and of no value. Sorry to rain on your parade, but please stick to your first hand experience and not what you heard from questionable sources.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Keith M.'s Comment
member avatar

No parade here, everything I "heard" I read here.

Keith wrote:

double-quotes-start.png

I was going to go with Prime. Thank God I didn't

double-quotes-end.png

You made the right choice for you, it worked. You did not experience Prime, KLLM or any of the other Paid CDL Training Programs. Yet you went out of your way more than once to basically bad-mouth them.

I’m glad your path worked for you. Really I am. However the negative editorial commentary was unnecessary and of no value. Sorry to rain on your parade, but please stick to your first hand experience and not what you heard from questionable sources.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I think you missed the point. Please explain what you meant.

No parade here, everything I "heard" I read here.

double-quotes-start.png

Keith wrote:

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I was going to go with Prime. Thank God I didn't

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

You made the right choice for you, it worked. You did not experience Prime, KLLM or any of the other Paid CDL Training Programs. Yet you went out of your way more than once to basically bad-mouth them.

I’m glad your path worked for you. Really I am. However the negative editorial commentary was unnecessary and of no value. Sorry to rain on your parade, but please stick to your first hand experience and not what you heard from questionable sources.

double-quotes-end.png

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Well just finished week 6 at COD. We took our SOS skills test and Road Test on 3/9 All 3 of us passed. We are now truckers. Yesterday and Today. Did more simulated alley docking, 45 backing, floating gears. Today I was the only one of us to show. So I went on one our usual routes and drove floating gears with the instructor and 3 new students. Then 1 student Rudy drove the practice run double clutching , did excellent. Switched to 2nd student he practiced his double clutching around the industrial park then back to the yard for lunch. After lunch back the yard 1 new Student Rudy learned skills on the Mac, while I sat in the Automatic with another student Mike doing his pre-trip. The other Truck came back and picked him up. He then went in the truck with one of the instructors and 2 other students and I went in the Mack (day cab) we do our SOS skill and pre-trip on and Rudy stayed with me while I did simulation ally docking and 45. I had the truck for about 2 hrs. After 1 hour I let him do his skills. He did very well.

Then plugged the Trucks up. And I was done. So glad I chose COD. I felt I had 1-on-1 training. The instructors knew what your were doing wrong and were able to easily fix it and explain why and how. We were never given the pre-trip and told go learn it. They were there with us the whole time. I was going to go with Prime. Thank God I didn't.

In 6 wks I have 42 hours of drive time. Hazmat Training. Alley docking, 45 back and coupling and uncoupling. Plus I will get my tuition reimbursed.

I will have all endorsements and no restrictions.

Thank You to those that have read this and commented.

Hearts to All

Hay, Keith!

We'd hoped you'd do a Schneider diary; are you still there, training in Gary? Solo yet?

Hope it's going well!

~ Anne ~

Floating Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Keith M.'s Comment
member avatar

Just finished my 2 weeks training with Schneider in Gary. It went Okay, didn't like the fact that they pushed respect and didn't even know our names. We were always referred to as Sir or between the trainers as being my guy. Also didn't like when you were doing 45 and when would a GOAL and ask them a question or tell them what you were going to do, they would say "what" like you were wrong then you would question yourself. Didn't really like that, there was no reaffirming or direction if incorrect.

So Monday I meet my TE (training engineer) in Sterling, IL. I will be on the Walmart account as my TE is. Which I am grateful for being put with a TE on the same account. Sterling is about 80 miles west of me. I will start at the Walmart DC every morning and end back there at the end of the run. So I will be in the sleeper every night at the Walmart DC. Schneider has a OC there, Showers, Laundry, Cafe. I can choose 2 days off a week or work 6 days (which has a bonus if you do) Just wanting to get the experience for now.

To those who are reading this blog Thank You

double-quotes-start.png

Well just finished week 6 at COD. We took our SOS skills test and Road Test on 3/9 All 3 of us passed. We are now truckers. Yesterday and Today. Did more simulated alley docking, 45 backing, floating gears. Today I was the only one of us to show. So I went on one our usual routes and drove floating gears with the instructor and 3 new students. Then 1 student Rudy drove the practice run double clutching , did excellent. Switched to 2nd student he practiced his double clutching around the industrial park then back to the yard for lunch. After lunch back the yard 1 new Student Rudy learned skills on the Mac, while I sat in the Automatic with another student Mike doing his pre-trip. The other Truck came back and picked him up. He then went in the truck with one of the instructors and 2 other students and I went in the Mack (day cab) we do our SOS skill and pre-trip on and Rudy stayed with me while I did simulation ally docking and 45. I had the truck for about 2 hrs. After 1 hour I let him do his skills. He did very well.

Then plugged the Trucks up. And I was done. So glad I chose COD. I felt I had 1-on-1 training. The instructors knew what your were doing wrong and were able to easily fix it and explain why and how. We were never given the pre-trip and told go learn it. They were there with us the whole time. I was going to go with Prime. Thank God I didn't.

In 6 wks I have 42 hours of drive time. Hazmat Training. Alley docking, 45 back and coupling and uncoupling. Plus I will get my tuition reimbursed.

I will have all endorsements and no restrictions.

Thank You to those that have read this and commented.

Hearts to All

double-quotes-end.png

Hay, Keith!

We'd hoped you'd do a Schneider diary; are you still there, training in Gary? Solo yet?

Hope it's going well!

~ Anne ~

Floating Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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