ABF Freight Driver Development Program

Topic 31553 | Page 11

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Bobcat_Bob's Comment
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Congratulations! I forgot to check in last week lol

You are already ahead of me I have 0 dock training and haven't been inside a spotter yet lol.

Keep up the good work!

Delco Dave's Comment
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Thanks Bobcat! Spotting trailers with the jockey is pretty cool. The turning radius on them is amazing. No cranking of landing gear, there’s a button in cab that releases the locking jaw. Only time you get out is to check your space and open/close swing doors.

Your not missing out on anything with the dock work. Unloading and staging is pretty monotonous, pull off trailer, place in bay near front of the door to be loaded. Loading on the other hand is an art/skill that takes awhile to develop. So far they have only given me easy loads of multiple pallets of the same product, size and weight to load. We are so busy they really haven’t had the time to teach me how to properly load freight of mixed sizes, shapes and weight. I enjoy puzzles so I’ll probably like the tetris loads.

How’d your Dad make out with his ABF interview?

PackRat's Comment
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Only time you get out is to check your space and open/close swing doors.

Don't forget the air lines.

Delco Dave's Comment
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Don't forget the air lines

Ha, Ha!!! Of course. I meant out to ground level. You unhook the Air line from the catwalk Right out the back door from cab.

PackRat's Comment
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double-quotes-start.png

Don't forget the air lines

double-quotes-end.png

Ha, Ha!!! Of course. I meant out to ground level. You unhook the Air line from the catwalk Right out the back door from cab.

I've seen yard drivers and day cab drivers forget those air lines before.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
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I've seen yard drivers and day cab drivers forget those air lines before.

Exempt, are ye?!? OTR drivers, too! LoLoL !!!!! ;) (Looking good tho, PackRat!! I've got trees to trim, too!!)

I'd LOVE to drive one of those hostler 1 person square/wockeyed thingies. I've watched Tom drive them, when he covered for the usual guy on a day off, at his company. MAN that looks FUN!!! Whip, zip, wow! I'd almost LOVE THAT JOB, but then again, one's gotta be a 'superfly' backer, I'd think. I'm not, haha!

Looking good, Dave! Love this diary.

~ Anne ~

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Delco Dave's Comment
member avatar

My process with jockey…

Hook, tug, raise 5th wheel, air line

Air line, lower 5th wheel, unhook

Truck

Hook, tug, check 5th wheel lock jaw and for gap, air/electric. Landing gear

Air/electric, landing gear, release lock jaw, drop airbags, unhook

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I've seen yard drivers and day cab drivers forget those air lines before.

double-quotes-end.png

Exempt, are ye?!? OTR drivers, too! LoLoL !!!!! ;) (Looking good tho, PackRat!! I've got trees to trim, too!!)

Well, I did hear some driver talking on the CB about a guy he knew one time that had a friend of a cousin's brothers girlfriend's hairdressers husband that had a sleeper cab and almost did it.

That's the only one I've heard about through a fourth party source.

smile.gif

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar
Your not missing out on anything with the dock work.

I'm not good at high pressure fast paces environments the dock supervisors are constantly breathing down tbeir necks. I know id screw something up in that situation. They offered to get me my dock certification and I ask if I had to they said "technically no" so I told them thanks but I'll pass.

How’d your Dad make out with his ABF interview?

They never called him back, probably had more people that didn't need training is my guess.

Might be for the best I'm afraid there will be a major slow down with freight and being low man on totem pole isn't good when that happens. We've slowed down dramatically it seems Tuesday my meet guys terminal didn't have freight for him and they are one of our biggest terminals. Luckily I was able to do a quick Indy run to get some miles.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Delco Dave's Comment
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4/28/22

Yesterday I reported to the Carlisle terminal for testing. I met the trainer and we went to the back of the yard so I could practice some maneuvers. Really just needed to take a couple runs at the parallel just in case I was assigned it. He asks me if I’m gonna practice parallel left as well, my jaw drops, was never told that was a possibility, nor tried it. He tells me parallel left is also an option and be ready. So I spent my practice time getting my bearings with the parallel left.

After lunch he had me drive over to the college and took me on the route they would be taking me on for the test. Did the run twice to familiarize myself with it. We then went for my test. Pre trip, I had to do the whole truck, nailed it, tester had me skip a few repeated parts since I was thorough with them the 1st time. Did straight back, offset right and luckily pulled alley dock, used a free pullup on the alley to make sure I was straight but didn’t really need it. Used 1of my free get outs. Put the ICC bar right on the line so all I had was a tiny back up to complete the maneuver.

Road test went smooth he said he only marked me a couple points, said I shift really well for being new, said last student he took out was a grind fest. He congratulated me and stamped my permit PASSED!!!

After we got back to terminal I then had my ABF doubles road test with head safety guy. I built a set at dusk, went through the pre trip with him then took the set out at dark for a 40 mile ride consisting of a few turns, right and left. Some local roads but mostly highway driving, changing lanes, left and right side exit ramps. PASSED

I’m now an official ABF driver, will be getting my plastic license tomorrow morning at the DMV. Manager said I’m getting my 1st run Monday

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

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