Concerned Newbie

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Francis F.'s Comment
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Ok veteran truckers, I and my fellow NTDs need some advice. I've discovered the trucks I'll be driving for Schneider Intermodal are going to be short cabs with no fridge or space for cooking. Is there a particular set of food prep equipment/storage and utensils that would be recommended? Or are there quick and somewhat inexpensive meal choices available at most travel stops? Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Bill M.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi Franics. The veteran in me says MRE. The new truck driver in me says brown bag it. Lol

But seriously, I dont have a fridge or microwave either. i travel with some ready to eat items at all times. Tuna fish, sardines, beef Jerky, minute microwaveable rice, instant oatmeal, fruit, carrots, celery sticks, canned spinach and greens, onions and garlic, dried fruit, peanuts, almonds, walnuts, cliff bars, protein bars, 5 gallons of water, electrolyte packets, peanut butter, bread, wraps, paper towels, hand wipes, plastic utensils and more.

The truck stops will usually have some quick item that are good, like bouled eggs, yogurt, fresh fruit and so on. You can make it work if you just look around. If I have a warm meal, I try to make it a good dinner because quick breakfast and lunch items are easy to carry or find. But a nice warm dinner can't be beat.

You'll figure out what works for you.

Ok veteran truckers, I and my fellow NTDs need some advice. I've discovered the trucks I'll be driving for Schneider Intermodal are going to be short cabs with no fridge or space for cooking. Is there a particular set of food prep equipment/storage and utensils that would be recommended? Or are there quick and somewhat inexpensive meal choices available at most travel stops? Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Ok veteran truckers, I and my fellow NTDs need some advice. I've discovered the trucks I'll be driving for Schneider Intermodal are going to be short cabs with no fridge or space for cooking. Is there a particular set of food prep equipment/storage and utensils that would be recommended? Or are there quick and somewhat inexpensive meal choices available at most travel stops? Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Hi Franics. The veteran in me says MRE. The new truck driver in me says brown bag it. Lol

But seriously, I dont have a fridge or microwave either. i travel with some ready to eat items at all times. Tuna fish, sardines, beef Jerky, minute microwaveable rice, instant oatmeal, fruit, carrots, celery sticks, canned spinach and greens, onions and garlic, dried fruit, peanuts, almonds, walnuts, cliff bars, protein bars, 5 gallons of water, electrolyte packets, peanut butter, bread, wraps, paper towels, hand wipes, plastic utensils and more.

The truck stops will usually have some quick item that are good, like boiled eggs, yogurt, fresh fruit and so on. You can make it work if you just look around. If I have a warm meal, I try to make it a good dinner because quick breakfast and lunch items are easy to carry or find. But a nice warm dinner can't be beat.

You'll figure out what works for you.

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Ok veteran truckers, I and my fellow NTDs need some advice. I've discovered the trucks I'll be driving for Schneider Intermodal are going to be short cabs with no fridge or space for cooking. Is there a particular set of food prep equipment/storage and utensils that would be recommended? Or are there quick and somewhat inexpensive meal choices available at most travel stops? Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

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I'd totally LOVE to see a pic of this 'short cab.' Like an old(er) coffin sleeper?!?!? Didn't know SNI had this going on!

Anyway; as far as recommended above, indeed. Quick canned stuff. My guy didn't have 'cooking' stuff on his truck when he was OTR; I'd prepack stew and other home cooked goodies, and 'ziplock' them for him. Also, check out 'ReadyWise(dot com)' for some AWESOME backup eats, pretty much MRE's!

Off to look up an SNI 'short cab,' interesting! G'Town ?!?!?

~ Anne ~

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Travis's Comment
member avatar

Mountain House has good "MRE" but better food. Might be a bit pricey but if you wanted to treat yourself once every few days.

I don't know DOT rules on small(a bit bigger than a can of tuna) gas canisters and screw on burners or small stoves in the cab, use in the cab(you could always use it outside the cab) etc but MSR makes small burners and gas cans. Get an aluminum or titanium cook set et voila. If allowed that's an option.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

IDMtnGal 's Comment
member avatar

Is that short cab yours to use all the time or are you having to turn it in at the end of the day and then someone else can drive it

Laura

JakeBreak's Comment
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Is that short cab yours to use all the time or are you having to turn it in at the end of the day and then someone else can drive it

Laura

This is important to know. If you have a small cab, but you gonna stay in it, you can invest in a lunchbox cooker and a cooler. Those should be pretty good to keep you going for awhile. You don't need a ton of space for cooking stuff.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

I heard a rumor that Russia is selling expired MRE’s to raise money for its war effort. Lol

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Is that short cab yours to use all the time or are you having to turn it in at the end of the day and then someone else can drive it

Laura

double-quotes-end.png

This is important to know. If you have a small cab, but you gonna stay in it, you can invest in a lunchbox cooker and a cooler. Those should be pretty good to keep you going for awhile. You don't need a ton of space for cooking stuff.

Yeppers! Susan D. @WST (WestSide Transport for those that didn't know..) had an AWESOME thread on just that!!!!

Mountain House has good "MRE" but better food. Might be a bit pricey but if you wanted to treat yourself once every few days.

I don't know DOT rules on small(a bit bigger than a can of tuna) gas canisters and screw on burners or small stoves in the cab, use in the cab(you could always use it outside the cab) etc but MSR makes small burners and gas cans. Get an aluminum or titanium cook set et voila. If allowed that's an option.

Better than Ready Wise? (I've still got my basic kit, saved, for a voyage!) .....

So, doesn't a roll of aluminum foil and an exhaust manifold, still work ?!?!? LoL .... Those 'mini' burners, I'd think would be a nope. Turtle spoke about that when he was flatbed with Prime. I really don't recall. Flatbedders get creative, where van and esp. reefer peeps cannot! Hibachi grills store easily somehow.. right??!? In a side box? LoLoL... ?!?!?

Chief Brody . . . << bet HE'S got secrets!

Best, y'all .. let usn's know, too!

~ Anne & Tom ~

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Pacific Pearl's Comment
member avatar

I think he's talking about a day cab. Sleeper berths (and all the creature comforts within) are reserved for drivers who don't get to go home every night. A lucky few day cab drivers have their employers spring for hotel rooms if they don't get to go home. That little RV in the back adds to the cost of the truck and subtracts from the mpg of the truck so companies don't usually spring for sleeper berths for local, home daily jobs.

Intermodal drivers generally go home every night and get weekends off. Intermodal is limited to within 150 miles of the port/railhead. How about a nutritious breakfast in the privacy of your own home before you leave for work in the morning and a brown bag lunch?

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

Francis F.'s Comment
member avatar

I've been told we drive for 3 weeks then turn it in. So, extra gear needs to be minimized, for sure.

And thanks everyone for the advice. It's all very much appreciated.

Is that short cab yours to use all the time or are you having to turn it in at the end of the day and then someone else can drive it

Laura

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