Appreciate Any Info. Need To Know What I Can Do.

Topic 31727 | Page 1

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Michael M.'s Comment
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I was recently let go from the carrier I went through training with. After going through with the program which entailed three phases ( on-site, driver trainer and solo. ) a driver reported I backed into a trailer in the yard. Safety instructed me to collect pictures and I did. I however didn't think anything of it because to the best of my knowledge I never made contact with said trailer and found no damage. Approx 5 days later my fleet manager informs me that they are reviewing the incident. When called into the office they tell me they reviewed the footage and are letting me go. When I asked to see the footage or proof they stated they would see if I'd be allowed to see it. I never was. Now I'm off work and cannot get another job due to the fact I'm listed as involuntary discharge. And an being billed $7,000 dollars for training. What can I do?

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
George B.'s Comment
member avatar

Depends on the company. Which company? Knowing this will result help with suggestions for a possible solution. 7,000$?

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

George B.'s Comment
member avatar

Why didnt they allow to see the proof? Another piece of advice. If you ate leaving out pertinent info, you will most likely not get the advice or answers you need.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

$7000 sounds like Roehl?

This is a hard one because usually it takes 3 incidents before a carrier lets you go and that is after proposing going through training again.

I would ask safety if I could go back through training. Otherwise apply everywhere

Good luck

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

I was recently let go from the carrier I went through training with. After going through with the program which entailed three phases ( on-site, driver trainer and solo. ) a driver reported I backed into a trailer in the yard. Safety instructed me to collect pictures and I did. I however didn't think anything of it because to the best of my knowledge I never made contact with said trailer and found no damage. Approx 5 days later my fleet manager informs me that they are reviewing the incident. When called into the office they tell me they reviewed the footage and are letting me go. When I asked to see the footage or proof they stated they would see if I'd be allowed to see it. I never was. Now I'm off work and cannot get another job due to the fact I'm listed as involuntary discharge. And an being billed $7,000 dollars for training. What can I do?

Yep, to George & Kearsey's replies, I'm thinking Roehl too. If you'd ADD your location (even just the state!) it would help us help you.

Thanks! Sorry this happened.

~ Anne ~

ps: I agree with the suggestion to 'start over' with said company.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

Apply everywhere and above all be honest on your applications. Do not leave out any incidents you may have had or that have been reported by your previous company.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Apply everywhere and above all be honest on your applications. Do not leave out any incidents you may have had or that have been reported by your previous company.

Indeed.

However, if the company was in fact, CRST ... might be a HUGE issue. Wish the OP would stop back!

The speakings of 'solo' makes me more think Kearsey's thoughts; however.... J.I.C. ~

0699304001649723475.jpg

Best wishes; go back and BEG, fwiw!

~ Anne ~

Pacific Pearl's Comment
member avatar

What can I do?

Three issues: wanting proof you hit the trailer, the training bill and finding employment. You could ask them nicely to show you what they have but you have already tried that and it didn't get you anywhere. File for unemployment. The carrier will have to prove that you were let go for cause or pay your unemployment benefits. Laws vary by state, but generally you will get a chance to see what evidence they submit and respond.

The bill and what rights you have to pay or dispute it will be in the contract - the one you signed before you started training there. If you're going to put your signature on a legal document you should ALWAYS keep a copy for future reference. It's as simple as taking a few pictures with your phone. Without being able to see the contract there's no way we can speculate on what your rights are.

As others have already stated - apply, apply, apply and answer honestly. Take ownership and admit what happened. There are several second chance companies out there who hire drivers with less than perfect driving histories. Some may even reimburse your tuition. Western Express and Dutch Maid come to mind. You can also try small, local companies who advertise on Craigslist. Many of them don't even use DAC reports.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

The 1 part regarding CRST's contracts, that is NEVER mentioned,long after 2006, is they can ONLY charge for the actual training costs. Which is $2,500 MAX, as prescribed by another judge back east. For me here in Cali, that would've included my 3 weeks staying in the dorms @ $150 a week + offsite school they used costs, if I included "free" breakfast n lunch, if they charged that too lol

But yeah sounds like Rhoel to me too specially Solo time. but 1 incident, if it even was 1. I think they should have to show you what they based firing you on....This STILL is America, and we STILL have RIGHTS ! lol Don't tell Joe that shhhhh secret

Michael M.'s Comment
member avatar

It was indeed Roehl. There was 2 prior incidents one involving bumper damage on another driver's truck in a truck stop. The other was rim damage to my trailer from a cement post on a light poll I didn't see in time.

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