Worst Interstates For Truckers

Topic 31769 | Page 2

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Bruce K.'s Comment
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24 around Nashville is more like an artillery testing range than an actual road.

rofl-1.gif

Great analogy!

Auggie69's Comment
member avatar

Currently, what road do you hate the most?

I was horrified by I76 in southern PA.

Thanks

I-81 in VA. ALWAYS seems to be an accident backing up traffic.

Bill M.'s Comment
member avatar

rofl-3.gif That's 100% accurate.

I agree 100% I can not believe Indiana can't figure out how to join a bridge and road. Even after "fixing" them they are horrible.

James H.'s Comment
member avatar

I-78 Pennsylvania from Allentown and eastward! The lanes are narrow, there is always construction, nobody obeys the truck lane restriction in construction zones

Can you explain why trucks are restricted to the left lane through there? That one has me baffled.

Baffle:

A partition or separator within a liquid tank, used to inhibit the flow of fluids within the tank. During acceleration, turning, and braking, a large liquid-filled tank may produce unexpected forces on the vehicle due to the inertia of liquids.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

This answer depends on how you classify "worst" - worst for what?

Winter driving? I-80 through Wyoming. Almost always very windy and cold, with snow-covered roads much of the way. Almost always treacherous.

Traffic? This could be almost anywhere, but the cities that stood out for me are Atlanta, Chicago, LA, and of course NYC, but NYC is more like a world unto itself. Nothing compares to that.

Rough roads? I can't tell you how many times I had to pick up things off the floor after going I-10 through Louisiana and Mississippi. They were concrete highways all the way, a total nightmare. Like riding a bucking bronco. I would love to hear they repaved all of it with asphalt.

Dan67's Comment
member avatar

Sure can. During construction the lanes often shift to the right on top of the emergency strip and that lane is not designed and built with a strong enough roadbed to accommodate the weight of the regular traffic flow. It is there if you need to pull off for a temporary stop. Another reason is that lanes are compressed and only one lane is truly wide enough for a truck.

double-quotes-start.png

I-78 Pennsylvania from Allentown and eastward! The lanes are narrow, there is always construction, nobody obeys the truck lane restriction in construction zones

double-quotes-end.png

Can you explain why trucks are restricted to the left lane through there? That one has me baffled.

Baffle:

A partition or separator within a liquid tank, used to inhibit the flow of fluids within the tank. During acceleration, turning, and braking, a large liquid-filled tank may produce unexpected forces on the vehicle due to the inertia of liquids.
Dan67's Comment
member avatar

Concrete roads are actually more durable and have better wear then asphalt road when the sub-roadbed is properly prepared. Problem is the construction companies always cheap it out because concrete costs more per mile. A few years ago I-85 around Spartanburg SC had to be completely ripped up and replaced as emergency repairs where happening weakly. The original company built the concrete section to thin. Also in South Carolina the I-95 section of concrete road from I-26 interchange southward was in horrendous shape and bounced you to the moon. They fixed that by sanding it down and now its very smooth.

Rough roads? I can't tell you how many times I had to pick up things off the floor after going I-10 through Louisiana and Mississippi. They were concrete highways all the way, a total nightmare. Like riding a bucking bronco. I would love to hear they repaved all of it with asphalt.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Concrete roads are actually more durable and have better wear then asphalt road when the sub-roadbed is properly prepared.

Yeah, but with the milling machines they use now, the asphalt highways are outstanding, and long-term maintenance is so much cheaper. Just build a super thick roadway and, when needed, mill off the top 12 inches or so and slap a fresh layer on it. Done. No more tearing out everything down to the dirt and starting over.

They even recycle the asphalt.

I can't recall ever traveling on a concrete highway that was smooth and stayed level over the years. Most concrete highways rock the truck forward and back from the day they're built.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I've always wondered which costs more overall including initial costs, upkeep, repairs, and longevity?

Another area that comes to mind are some of the scales entry and egress lanes. Some of these are also noteworthy or infamous for dishing out a pounding for the truck and it's occupants. I've always thought they keep these in poor shape mainly to force the drivers to slow down.

Anne A. (Momma Anne) & To's Comment
member avatar

Sure can. During construction the lanes often shift to the right on top of the emergency strip and that lane is not designed and built with a strong enough roadbed to accommodate the weight of the regular traffic flow. It is there if you need to pull off for a temporary stop. Another reason is that lanes are compressed and only one lane is truly wide enough for a truck.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I-78 Pennsylvania from Allentown and eastward! The lanes are narrow, there is always construction, nobody obeys the truck lane restriction in construction zones

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Can you explain why trucks are restricted to the left lane through there? That one has me baffled.

double-quotes-end.png

Exactly what Tom just said, Dan. Makes total sense. His brother was in the paving industry (Kokosing) until retirement, and Tom pulled asphalt 6122 and 3257 (ready to mix, from tanks) for 5 years.

When I was with him, back then, on the i280 to Toledo/Detroit, it was ALWAYS construction, and we were always 'snugging' the left lane. I wouldn't drive that stretch. Seemed like an INCH clearance, to these guys:

0392971001650741820.jpg

I'll learn that part, when I have to! LoL...

~ Anne ~

Baffle:

A partition or separator within a liquid tank, used to inhibit the flow of fluids within the tank. During acceleration, turning, and braking, a large liquid-filled tank may produce unexpected forces on the vehicle due to the inertia of liquids.
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