Please Help Me Choose The Right First Employer/trainer And City

Topic 31921 | Page 4

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George B.'s Comment
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Abco out of Florida also. Not sure if they hire newbies. Thanks Bk.

Banks's Comment
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Experience isn't perfection. Too often, people romanticize this career and don't understand what they're getting into.

The point of my posts was to point out the flaws in your plan to give you realistic expectations. Everything from cost of living to hiring areas. It gives you something to think about and a better idea of what's waiting for you.

I lack empathy and I'm not sure if it's something I want to work on. I try to keep everything logical because that's how my mind works. Cause and effect and worry about what I can control.

Rookie_the_Great's Comment
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Thnx everyone, I was busy and could not follow up with the thread for the past couple of days. So far I am fully focused on finding a reasonable and affordable accommodation and did not apply for jobs (as where I am going to live may or may not affect who I can work for). So far my options in South CA and South FL were either too expensive, long term commitment or far from city/public transportation access (as I don't have car yet and it may take some time to find a good used one). If I give up South CA/South FL due to no options left, I will check Texas or Midwest states that some of you suggested here or so.

(If I skip reacting/responding to some parts of comments, it is only due to heavy Trucker Language being used. If something sounds very important, I will make sure to ask for clarification)

@Anne A: Thnx, I already have Vegas residence and mailing address.

@BK: Thnx, other two languages I speak and a few more that I can somewhat/barely understand/read are all tied up with stereotypes, so I used to get away from heated conversations by not mentioning them. Used to like chit chat when I was new in the US but realized after years that it does not benefit me or others. Schneider is in my list to contact as soon as I sort out my accommodation. But an active user in TTR direct messaged me and told me that Schneider (pay) is not as good as what they say?! To be honest, as a starter all I care for beginning is ""Good Training"" and ""Sane Starting Work Condition (so I don't burn out like others)"". Money can come later... I personally witnessed how these two factors affected three of acquaintances and friend of friends. Two burnt out and left (masculine young guys) and one survived (very petit young lady). The employer of the lady started easy on her and invested on training her, the result was she is still driving for them for the past 4 years and would never ever think about going to another company for pay raise (despite of getting offers right and left, specially because of being a popular young lady!).

@george B: Thnx

@G-Town: Thnx

Old School's Comment
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Hello Rookie the Great!

I think you are falling for one of the biggest misconceptions there is concerning this career. Try to approach this logically. Get your emotions out of the equation and ignore what became of your friends who failed at trucking. Your friends failed at the same companies others have succeeded at. Therefore it really wasn't something that can be blamed on the company, the training, or the location.

Trucking is a remarkable job that requires remarkable people. It's full of challenges and rewards. As drivers, what makes us successful, is being able to minimize the challenges and maximize the rewards. That's our responsibility. You can't pin that onto anyone or anything outside yourself. I see people fail at my company, my terminal , and even my very special dedicated account all the time. I watch all this while being wildly successful here. They just don't understand how vital their commitment to their own success is.

There are a lot of easy targets to lay blame on in trucking. People fall for the blame game all the time. You have already fallen for it. That's why you think these nonessential requirements you are focusing on will help you succeed. I hope you will stick around and learn from the very successful professionals here.

The main thing every great Rookie has in common is a commitment to success. That commitment is laser focused on their own performance in constant adversity. That's where you want to put all your energy. Let Commitment be your focus and you will rise above the challenges of the name on your truck, your perceptions of your lack of training, and any other lame excuse you feel like pointing to.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

NaeNaeInNC's Comment
member avatar

I don't think I could agree more with this statement.

Of the people in my immediate PSD group, I am the only one "still standing" after the year mark. I'm not sure how many of the 20 from day one orientation are still here.

This industry takes commitment, determination, and resilience. I came into it with a pretty good understanding of what is important, and what is someone just flapping their jaws to hear their own voice. I took DRASTIC measures to work for the company I do. Me being successful requires me getting up every day, and moving forward. Some people don't understand what it takes, or have the ability to make those sacrifices. That's ok, perhaps trucking isn't for them.

Hello Rookie the Great!

I think you are falling for one of the biggest misconceptions there is concerning this career. Try to approach this logically. Get your emotions out of the equation and ignore what became of your friends who failed at trucking. Your friends failed at the same companies others have succeeded at. Therefore it really wasn't something that can be blamed on the company, the training, or the location.

Trucking is a remarkable job that requires remarkable people. It's full of challenges and rewards. As drivers, what makes us successful, is being able to minimize the challenges and maximize the rewards. That's our responsibility. You can't pin that onto anyone or anything outside yourself. I see people fail at my company, my terminal , and even my very special dedicated account all the time. I watch all this while being wildly successful here. They just don't understand how vital their commitment to their own success is.

There are a lot of easy targets to lay blame on in trucking. People fall for the blame game all the time. You have already fallen for it. That's why you think these nonessential requirements you are focusing on will help you succeed. I hope you will stick around and learn from the very successful professionals here.

The main thing every great Rookie has in common is a commitment to success. That commitment is laser focused on their own performance in constant adversity. That's where you want to put all your energy. Let Commitment be your focus and you will rise above the challenges of the name on your truck, your perceptions of your lack of training, and any other lame excuse you feel like pointing to.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.
Rookie_the_Great's Comment
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Hello everyone It took a while but I am back in the US and settled down in San Diego! I will review the comments again in a minute but if there was anything new, please let me know.

Anne A. (Momma Anne) & To's Comment
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Hello everyone It took a while but I am back in the US and settled down in San Diego! I will review the comments again in a minute but if there was anything new, please let me know.

Welcome back stateside !!!

Still the same, pretty much; ask any questions that come up, for the vets on here, anytime!

~ Anne ~

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