Non-CDL, E-logs, Weight Stations, Ohio.

Topic 32246 | Page 2

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G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Randall when you run from Ohio to PA, what is the mileage from point A in Ohio to point B in PA? Do you return to point A in Ohio every day? Do you know the weight of your truck when loaded? How many hours per day are you driving? A CDL holder is held to much closer scrutiny and compliance than a non-CDL holder.

Randall I encourage you to research the details of your job using the FMCSA and JJ Keller websites, as well as other resources. DOT loves pulling over small time, wildcat operators because they are all but guaranteed of finding violations. Be your own advocate.

At this point in your career you should know the law. Although there are many things you are not required todo, other things you are. Without knowing the answers to the questions I asked, at the very least you must log on duty time (when you begin work and when you are finished) although details are not required, you must keep a record of it and comply with, at a minimum the 11 hour driving limit. It’s your license… not your employers. I could go on, but you need to do the leg work here, I’m not doing it for you.

And good grief, pull into every scale!!! You are driving a truck, a commercial vehicle. It’s your job to run legal. Don’t rely on your employer to give you the right answers or encourage you to do anything illegal (like blowing past a scale).

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

When I see questions like this it makes me wonder why you didn't drive to a weigh station and ask. Drive in your personal vehicle if you want and tell them the story. They aren't going to lie

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Kearsey wrote:

When I see questions like this it makes me wonder why you didn't drive to a weigh station and ask. Drive in your personal vehicle if you want and tell them the story. They aren't going to lie

Mic drop… best idea yet.

Just make sure you have your facts straight Randall; meaning answers to the questions I asked. Don’t leave anything out.

Randall B.'s Comment
member avatar

When I see questions like this it makes me wonder why you didn't drive to a weigh station and ask. Drive in your personal vehicle if you want and tell them the story. They aren't going to lie

Thanks for the advice I hadn't thought of do that. But, I was able to get answers from another source that does what I am doing now and any one over 10,000 pounds has to use scales in our areas unless marked otherwise. Also anyone with a GVWR over 10,000 pounds follows similar short haul exemptions as CDL Drivers. For non-CDL drivers to be exempt from recording logs you must operate within 150 air miles, Do not drive through any state that requires a CDL for the type of vehicle being driven, Report back to the same work location every day, Do not drive after the 14th hour of coming on duty in a period of seven consecutive days, Do not drive after the 16th hour of coming on duty in a period of two consecutive days.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

GVWR:

Gross Vehicle Weight Rating

GVWR is the maximum operating weight of a vehicle as specified by the manufacturer, minus any trailers.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Do you currently have your CDL? Or not?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Randall B.'s Comment
member avatar

Yes, I have my CDL.

Do you currently have your CDL? Or not?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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