Getting Weak

Topic 32624 | Page 1

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Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

Over the last couple of weeks I have found that I don't have the stamina to drive as long as I used to. I don't know if it's possibly because lately the substantial portion of my driving has often started after I have been waiting to be loaded/unloaded for a few hours. It wasn't that long ago that I could easily drive 10 or 11 hours with just a 30-minute to 1-hour break thrown in. These past couple of weeks I hit 6 hours of driving and feel ready for a nap. I have been putting on a little bit of weight. Could that be the simple answer? Weight gain is leading to me feeling lethargic and in need of sleep more often?

George B.'s Comment
member avatar

Try a stopping for a few or even your 30 do something to get the blood pumping. Brisk walk. Lord jog if you can. It helped me a great deal.

George B.'s Comment
member avatar

Not jogging. I couldnt jog if I had a steak tied ti my butt w pit bulls chasing me! rofl-3.gif

The Zen Joker 's Comment
member avatar

Look up Hindu Squats (link below). Work on progressions. If you can only squat a little on each rep keep working towards getting lower each week. PLUS you can do them standing still. Great calisthenic low impact exercise that will burn fat and loosen up your lower back too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw2OT_-M8ek

Also, be sure you are taking a multivitamin. The B vitamins are crucial to energy and several other vits and mins will also help your metabolism. Be well man!!

Not jogging. I couldnt jog if I had a steak tied ti my butt w pit bulls chasing me! rofl-3.gif

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

Look up Hindu Squats (link below). Work on progressions. If you can only squat a little on each rep keep working towards getting lower each week. PLUS you can do them standing still. Great calisthenic low impact exercise that will burn fat and loosen up your lower back too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw2OT_-M8ek

Also, be sure you are taking a multivitamin. The B vitamins are crucial to energy and several other vits and mins will also help your metabolism. Be well man!!

double-quotes-start.png

Not jogging. I couldnt jog if I had a steak tied ti my butt w pit bulls chasing me! rofl-3.gif

double-quotes-end.png

This is great. I have never heard of this, but it's definitely something that I can and will do.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

Over the last couple of weeks I have found that I don't have the stamina to drive as long as I used to. I don't know if it's possibly because lately the substantial portion of my driving has often started after I have been waiting to be loaded/unloaded for a few hours. It wasn't that long ago that I could easily drive 10 or 11 hours with just a 30-minute to 1-hour break thrown in. These past couple of weeks I hit 6 hours of driving and feel ready for a nap. I have been putting on a little bit of weight. Could that be the simple answer? Weight gain is leading to me feeling lethargic and in need of sleep more often?

Just a few thoughts;

1. The recent time change could be part of it.

2. While I wouldn't expect "a little bit" of weight gain, it could be part of it. If you're gaining weight, maybe rethink what changed in your diet.

3. If you're up and not rolling until 4-5hours later and you were previously rolling an hour after getting up, sure, that could be affecting your energy level.

It sounds like a combination of the things you probably already know.

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

A lot of factors can determine your restfulness, sleep debt is a major issue, what time of the day your circadian rhythm your best at, diet. Exercise, stress levels.

I've found for me, I naturally gravitate toward being awake til 4 or 5 am, and sleeping til 11 or noon. I can run all day in Those hours, but if I end up driving more conventional hours, I get the afternoon crash at about 2 pm. If I do that I pull over and take a nap, utilizing split berth.

In general though. I try to optimize my time that I'm naturally awake at. My DM knows that and I get a lot of niche loads that have late night deliveries. I usually try to reschedule the loads that are around 8 am, in many cases directly with the shipper or reciever. I prefer open ended windows for drop and hooks. But we take what loads we can get.

I stay away from fast food, eat a balanced high protein diet, workout every couple nights and drink plenty of water. Presently exploring coffee substitute, so decaf or sugar free hot coco.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

A lot of factors can determine your restfulness, sleep debt is a major issue, what time of the day your circadian rhythm your best at, diet. Exercise, stress levels.

I've found for me, I naturally gravitate toward being awake til 4 or 5 am, and sleeping til 11 or noon. I can run all day in Those hours, but if I end up driving more conventional hours, I get the afternoon crash at about 2 pm. If I do that I pull over and take a nap, utilizing split berth.

In general though. I try to optimize my time that I'm naturally awake at. My DM knows that and I get a lot of niche loads that have late night deliveries. I usually try to reschedule the loads that are around 8 am, in many cases directly with the shipper or reciever. I prefer open ended windows for drop and hooks. But we take what loads we can get.

I stay away from fast food, eat a balanced high protein diet, workout every couple nights and drink plenty of water. Presently exploring coffee substitute, so decaf or sugar free hot coco.

What you are describing as to driving times is precisely what I am experiencing. I didn't really realize it until I read it. Here lately I have been getting loads where I start driving at a more traditional time to start one's day and I have been hitting that mid-afternoon crash. I have been doing just as you described and getting a nap in with a split. If I do most of my driving when the sun is down, I feel like I can go for as long as I want; but when I have to start at like 6-8 in the morning, I am lucky to last 8 hours.

The weight gain I am thinking is slacking on getting my walks in and slacking on a healthy diet. I am pretty sure that walking more again will help with the energy level.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Over the last couple of weeks I have found that I don't have the stamina to drive as long as I used to. I don't know if it's possibly because lately the substantial portion of my driving has often started after I have been waiting to be loaded/unloaded for a few hours. It wasn't that long ago that I could easily drive 10 or 11 hours with just a 30-minute to 1-hour break thrown in. These past couple of weeks I hit 6 hours of driving and feel ready for a nap. I have been putting on a little bit of weight. Could that be the simple answer? Weight gain is leading to me feeling lethargic and in need of sleep more often?

double-quotes-end.png

Just a few thoughts;

1. The recent time change could be part of it.

2. While I wouldn't expect "a little bit" of weight gain, it could be part of it. If you're gaining weight, maybe rethink what changed in your diet.

3. If you're up and not rolling until 4-5hours later and you were previously rolling an hour after getting up, sure, that could be affecting your energy level.

It sounds like a combination of the things you probably already know.

As I mentioned in my previous post in response to Davy's comment, I have gotten a little lazy with the diet. Instead of sticking to healthy options that I prepare myself, I have been getting too nany slices of pizza and cheeseburgers.

Schedule has definitely been a bit funky lately. I will get my full 8 hours of sleep, but then wait several hours for a load. Timing wise, I should get more sleep in, but I am not someone who can just put himself to sleep. Once in a while I can, but typically not.

I really appreciate all of the feedback and suggestions.

The Zen Joker 's Comment
member avatar

Hey Davy,

As I contemplate diving in this coming spring, you mentioned my #1 concern in your reply "Circadian Rhythm". I know the Lion's share of drivers prefer to start their day at 3-5 am. Honestly my best 12-14 hours of alert work will be between 7 am and 9 pm if my load itineraries permit it. But then what about parking????? I plan to drive Midwest Regional which I've heard is better than the coasts, but how do I find parking at rest area truck stops, etc. between 7-9 pm? That is another concern. Just curious for your and anyone else's thoughts. Thanks much!!!!

I've found for me, I naturally gravitate toward being awake til 4 or 5 am, and sleeping til 11 or noon. I can run all day in Those hours, but if I end up driving more conventional hours, I get the afternoon crash at about 2 pm. If I do that I pull over and take a nap, utilizing split berth.

In general though. I try to optimize my time that I'm naturally awake at. My DM knows that and I get a lot of niche loads that have late night deliveries. I usually try to reschedule the loads that are around 8 am, in many cases directly with the shipper or reciever. I prefer open ended windows for drop and hooks. But we take what loads we can get.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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