Drivers Hauling Manufactured Factory Homes

Topic 32660 | Page 1

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BK's Comment
member avatar

Yesterday I was on I81 from Tennessee up to PA. I was passed by two trucks at two separate times hauling Clayton factory homes, each with chase cars. It just appalled me to observe how reckless these drivers were. Exceeding the speed limit, weaving in and out of traffic and tailgating any vehicle in their way. Aren’t there restrictions on these wide loads? I was traveling in a line of several trucks in heavy traffic and saw one of the chase cars speed by the truck in front of the line, pull in front of the truck and brake dramatically to slow the trucks so the Clayton driver who was all the way in the passing lane could get in front of the trucks. This makes three times I have recently encountered such behavior in as many weeks. Afterward I wondered if I should have called 911 and reported these incidents. I just might do that the next time. Anybody have thoughts or advice about this type of situation? My thought is to give these house haulers a wide berth.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Aren’t there restrictions on these wide loads?

Yes there are. They've got to have permits. They have to stop at every weigh station and show their documents. Each state they travel through has their own set of rules that must be obeyed. Most states only allow them to travel during daylight hours. Each state determines the route they must take and there are significant fines for getting off the designated route.

I'm not going to excuse what you witnessed, but you probably don't understand the issues the driver is dealing with. Often you'll see oversized loads running faster than the rest of the traffic. They are typically limited to certain hours so they try to accomplish as much as possible during the time they can legally drive. The escort cars are a tremendous help to the driver. When I'm running something oversized we are in constant communication on the C.B. The front car is letting you know what hazards are ahead and the rear car is helping control the traffic so you can meet the hazards without incident.

When you said this...

I was traveling in a line of several trucks in heavy traffic and saw one of the chase cars speed by the truck in front of the line, pull in front of the truck and brake dramatically to slow the trucks so the Clayton driver who was all the way in the passing lane could get in front of the trucks.

I immediately thought that was a maneuver to help the wide load navigate a bridge just ahead. He needs both lanes sometimes to keep from hitting the bridge railings or causing an accident with some nut trying to squeeze onto the bridge with him. You saw dangerous reckless behavior, but it it may have been caution and managing an obstacle course you were unaware of.

Give those guys room and a little grace. They need all the help they can get.

Again, I don't excuse any kind of reckless driving, but sometimes we may not understand all the facts as to why an oversized load and it's escort vehicles are conducting themselves the way they do.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
BK's Comment
member avatar

Old School, thanks for adding some perspective to my observations. What I saw I deemed aggressive and reckless driving behavior. My initial thought was that these guys needed to slow down to allow regular truck traffic to be able to pass by at appropriate stretches of the road. I have a hard time accepting the wisdom of these wide loads traveling at 75 in a 70mph zone, regardless of their deadlines and schedules. They make me nervous and I don’t like to be nervous. In the future, my policy will be to back off and give them time to get far ahead of me. Just like I do with other crazy drivers. And where did I learn to do this? From previous comments here on how to diffuse road rage.

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

I agree with what Old School said. Whenever I see them block more than their lane, they're usually preparing for a bridge or guardrail coming up.

If you think dodging a merging four-wheeler, in your semi is tough, try it dragging that house behind you. rofl-3.gif

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

I think a lot of people forget that those escorts serve multiple purposes. Not only are they communicating with the driver and watching for potential hazards, they’re also there for traffic control and rolling road blocks when needed. Do they take additional liberties at times? Yep, they do. Once you’ve pulled a few loads which require escorts and their distinct abilities though, you really do start to appreciate how diligent the good ones can be. This time of the year gets pretty difficult due to the lack of daylight travel hours and planning can be even more difficult when dealing with city travel curfews as well. I’m not 100% defending their actions but having dealt with the situations, I have a different outlook on what it takes to move those types of loads under various circumstances, especially taking into account that the general motoring public doesn’t give an inch in regards to space or paying attention, sometimes a bit of a reminder let’s them know Hey!!!! This thing is big lol.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
BK's Comment
member avatar

I appreciate the greater insight into this specialized type of driving. This has definitely changed my viewpoint of these drivers and their methods. In the future, I will make sure I am out of their way and letting them get considerable distance from me. When I stop to think about it, driving these wide loads at highway speeds must require nerves of steel.

Bill M.'s Comment
member avatar

BK, yes. They are some of my least favorite rigs to see out there on the road. Second only to Amazon prime haulers. Lol. Most of the time, they exceed the speed limit by a long shot. The chase cars, as I call them, are reckless as all get out. But I get it. I have learned to slow down and get out of the way when I see these rigs pulling manufactured homes. I create as much space as I can and let them rip it. It doesn't cost me much time to do so, and it improves my chances of staying safely on the road. LOL

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Here's something most don't know: the majority of those single and double-wide trailers from the manufacturers do not have, and are not required to have, trailer brakes.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Sallier's Comment
member avatar

Here's something most don't know: the majority of those single and double-wide trailers from the manufacturers do not have, and are not required to have, trailer brakes.

wtf.gif wtf.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bill M.'s Comment
member avatar

I realized that when one of these drivers pulled into a Love's parking lot. I was walking across the parking lot when the truck was turning in. He turned right, and one of the trailer tires rolled left in front of me and looped around, striking the side of his trailer. True story.confused.gif

Here's something most don't know: the majority of those single and double-wide trailers from the manufacturers do not have, and are not required to have, trailer brakes.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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