One Year Over The Road

Topic 3518 | Page 1

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Old School's Comment
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Just reached my anniversary date and was greeted this morning with a message on the qualcomm with a seven cent per mile increase on my pay! I don't know what the industry average would be but I was pleased with it. That's about an 8,000.00 increase in my annual pay based on last years miles. There's no reason why my miles this year shouldn't increase some what just because of the very steep learning curve of those first 4 - 6 months this past year.

I just really wanted to post about reaching this point because I wanted to say how much I appreciate everybody here, and how helpful this site as a whole has been to me in getting this second career for me off the ground. I've also enjoyed being able to give back to the industry here in helping the new-comers have a little better understanding of what they are up against as they break into the trucking industry.

For me I've decided to stay right where I'm at least for probably another year. All the things I've learned, and gotten familiar with about the way this company operates and runs me across the country - all the customers that I'm familiar with, and the secret little places I know that I can park at that are near my customers - all these little details make up what I consider to be an advantage to staying here and not moving on to somewhere that I may have to go through a whole new learning experience. So often I find it is these little details which keep me able to get more accomplished than the next driver.

It really is true what Brett has always told us. You will be the deciding factor in your success at this career. I'm proud to be working at Western Express, one of the most maligned companies you can find on the trucking reviews. I've had great success here and I see no reason for it to change in this coming year. I will continue to push all the limits and do my best to outperform my fellow employees - that is the key to success in this business - You've got to be on top of your game no matter what the odds are against you. If you can wake up every day and conquer the stuff that defeats everyone else, then you will enjoy success at this most rewarding career.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
6 string rhythm's Comment
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Old School, I'm very happy for you and am also encouraged by your success. You're one of the members on this forum that I have a great deal of respect for. I'm hoping we might bump into each other on the road someday! Thank you for your contribution to this forum. I'm sure you've helped countless drivers, especially prospective drivers and students like myself. I'm hoping to be able to contribute with my experience on this forum as well, once I get to living the trucking lifestyle and doing the job.

Scott B.'s Comment
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Congratulations Mr. School. So you've decided to drive for Western when you grow up huh? Admirable. Here's to your continued success and happiness. And Bill, you might wanna rephrase that. I sincerely hope you DONT bump into anyone.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Tarren W.'s Comment
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Here, Here! Congratulations and continued success!

Tarren

Schism's Comment
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Old School , you are an example of the professional driver this web site talks about week in and and week out .

A 1 year success story at a company which really sees few positive reviews anywhere plus your personal plan on staying a second year is exactly what folks coming into this industry needs to read about . A huge congrats to you sir !!

That $.07 per mile seems like a very respectable bump . It's more than I would have thought would happen in a mega carrier , honestly .

I'm hoping after a year in the business I can be as satisfied as you are and can look back at a year as successful as yours .

~S~

Steven N. (aka Wilson)'s Comment
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Gratz, Old School!

You deserve it!

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Starcar's Comment
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We are always telling new students to be very picky about what company you go with for your first year. Old School's experience is exactly why !!! He chose his company well...he' happy with them, the miles, the pay, and has proven himself a valued employee. That is EXACTLY what you should be doing your first year of driving !! Old School's company likes him so much, that they gave him a sizable pay hike...THEY WANT TO KEEP HIM !!! The companies know that after your first year, you can go to work for anyone. That first company has invest more than just schooling in you. They have given you the shipper receiver knowledge, fuel stop, weigh scales, and put you into a truck that costs more than most houses. You should be paying them back, during that fist year, with the following: Running as hard as you can, legally. Excellent treatment of shippers and receivers. Taking care of their truck (keep it clean inside, don't trash it) Be respectful to your dispatch. Be honest, and inform them of any problems. And most of all, keep in mind the huge risk they take hiring you.......the investment they make is HUGE.

So picking your first company is a combination of things. Its a risk on your part, and the company's part. Appreciate what they do for you, cuz they sure hang alot of money on your rookie butt.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Starcar's Comment
member avatar

Dang....I forgot to say...

CONGRATULATIONS OLD SCHOOL !!!!!!!!! FLATBEDDERS DO IT BEST !!!! You are such an inspiration to all these new drivers coming into trucking. You have shown the professional attitude that it takes to learn this job, and do this job...all the while, showing your company, shippers, receivers, and the motoring public, that truckers CAN be respectable, caring, and good at what they do. I thank you..............................you are what I want to see every driver who comes thru TT to aspire to be......

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Serah D.'s Comment
member avatar

Congratulations Old School.....well deserved!!!

Sheffield Mick's Comment
member avatar

Congratulations Old School.....I'm five days off my own first year of driving. Staying the course and keeping rolling is the key. Thank you for all your posts, its been great sharing your experiences with you and I'm looking forward to many more adventures ;-)

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