Unions In The Trucking Industry!!

Topic 5785 | Page 2

Page 2 of 4 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!
The unions themselves.... They will die out without my help

They'll make a comeback, but not likely in the trucking industry anytime soon.

Right now, U.S. corporations are making the highest profits in history. They also have amassed the largest amount of cash in history.

Here's a quote from an article by the Economic Policy Institute about the wages of upper management versus the rest of the workers:

The average annual earnings of the top 1 percent of wage earners grew 156 percent from 1979 to 2007; for the top 0.1 percent they grew 362 percent (Mishel, Bivens, Gould, and Shierholz 2012). In contrast, earners in the 90th to 95th percentiles had wage growth of 34 percent, less than a tenth as much as those in the top 0.1 percent tier. Workers in the bottom 90 percent had the weakest wage growth, at 17 percent from 1979 to 2007.

So that was a rather clumsy way of saying that from 1979-2007, the bottom 90% of workers have seen a 17% increase in wages while the executives at the top have seen a 156% increase in wages.

In an article by The Wall Street Journal from 2010 they talk about the gigantic cash hordes that corporations have amassed in recent years:

The Federal Reserve reported Thursday that nonfinancial companies had socked away $1.84 trillion in cash and other liquid assets as of the end of March, up 26% from a year earlier and the largest-ever increase in records going back to 1952. Cash made up about 7% of all company assets, including factories and financial investments, the highest level since 1963.

So there's clearly a large disconnect. The increasing wage inequality and large cash hordes that major corporations have amassed is eventually going to send our economy into ruins or stoke the union fires once again. But what we're doing is completely unsustainable if we want to have any sort of economic prosperity and a nice standard of living in the coming decades.

By the way, China just surpassed the U.S. as the largest economy in the world. The question isn't whether or not we're witnessing the slow decline of the American Empire. The question is how far will we fall?

confused.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Nothing I love more than Guyjax talking about unions. That was wonderful and a great start to my 640 mile day!

Karl A.'s Comment
member avatar

Hahaha Guyjax you had me cracking up.. Didnt know you were so passionate about unions lol.. Hey Brett as in regards to the decline of the American economy, I am sure you have heard all the rumors about china saying it was going to go onto a gold standard... That the B.R.I.C.S. (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa) economic union has been rumored to be having talks of all going to a Gold standard to destroy the American economy, If that happens how far we fall wont matter bc any answer to that question would be a disaster.. Now i doubt that will happen but its a possibility.. Also in regard to the comeback of the unions due to economic inequality, I personally feel the corporation and the the upper elite of rich are to powerful from profits to let that happen.. I mean all they would have to do is start passing legislation and paying people to pass it to destroy unions.. If that didnt work there is always illegal activity the could finance.. So in that regard I have always grown up in the south understanding unions were a thing of the past and dying out, only to be left in parts of the country where they grew out from and are a part of the culture.. I have always wondered why people abide by strict rules and pay someone to work somewhere, always wondered what the perks were..

Woody's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

I dont know how guyjax is the go to guy on unions since he doesnt work for one but ok.

Guyjax i hold my tounge on most of your posts but since you wouldnt give .02 to save a union workers life i guess i will chime in on this one.

Fiest off i find it funny that you talk about the attitudes of union workers. This coming from a guy that gets so butt hurt by someone parking in his spot that he has to block him in instead of parking somewhere else in a lot that was half empty. Blow all the smoke you want but you and i both know you could have parked elswhere even with your sleeper cab but you wanted to be an ass. An even better example was when the recruiter from your company called. You say your just doing your job and dont understand the attitude when you go on a union lot to pull their freight. But you gave her hell for calling you even though you already worked there. Simply because she didnt do a thorough background check on you to see where you were working like she has time to do that on everyone she calls. She was wrong to retaliate the way she did, if that really happened, but make no mistake about it her response was due to you treating her like crap. Some people think saying i speak my mind, i tell the truth, im brutally honest, or any of the other catch frases gives them them a free pass to be an ass and sadly your one of those people.

Saying that unions are no longer needed when wage gaps are at an all time high is insane. The need for united workers and politicians that will acrually stand up for the middle class is more imporfant now than it has been for many years. While i do not agree with everything a union does i know i would not have the opportunity i currently have without them. I do not pay them dues to keep my job, i pay because of the value that being united brings us as workers. You dont pay but you still benefit from unions and if you dont see that your eyes are closed.

EVERYONE didnt sign an agreement to bring hired transportation in to pull those loads and that is a current hot button within the union. Combine that with the huge chip you always seem to have on your shoulder i would not be surprised in the least if you caught flak while on a union lot. I am in our terminal everyday and see outside help all the time. I have never seen one of those drivers berated. Im not dumb enougn to say it never happens, but im also smart enough to know how you like to escalate situations and realize if you get attitude everytime your on the lot there might be a reason.

Im sick of trying to type on this little screen and Im sure ill catch plenty of backlash for speaking out against the great Guyjax so i think i will go now.

Woody

Notiice that even though you came up with several pet names for union workers i refrained from calling you a scab smile.gif

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Karl A.'s Comment
member avatar

Woody I have to say representation of the middle class (which is being destroyed) is at an all time high in my lifetime for sure... I agree with that perspective... I also agree with your POV on the income inequality.. How long have you been a union member Woody? How much did you know about unions before you joined one and what are the downsides you could admit to being that you are a union member?

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Woody's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

Woody I have to say representation of the middle class (which is being destroyed) is at an all time high in my lifetime for sure... I agree with that perspective... I also agree with your POV on the income inequality.. How long have you been a union member Woody? How much did you know about unions before you joined one and what are the downsides you could admit to being that you are a union member?

Ive been a teamster for six months so I keep my eyes and ears open everyday to learn about whats going on..

My previous experience with unions was not great. I had been involved with two others. One when i was young and already had my job in construction. Due to working on some union projects i was forced to join. While i wont go into details it ended up with the union BA and I standing toe to toe ready to throw down when my boss kicked me off the job site. My boss had no issue with me or what i was saying but he had to cool things down and it had no effect on my job going forward. The other was a manufacturing job where the employees had the option of joining or not joining the union. I would have to write a book to cover all the issues with this setup.

I have no issue talking about the downsides of a union. There is good and bad, in a good union the plusses far outweighs the minusses. In a poor union you get little value for your investment. Unions go by seniority so workjng your way up can be harder. As guy mentioned to get a premium run in a union shop you have to have your time in. That being said i got a bid run after being in my company for 3 weeks. This does NOT normally happen and i expect to run the extra board after the next bid which i wont mind. When things are slow the senior drivers will be dispatched before lower drivers which i dont have a problem with. There are safeguards in place to make sure junior members still get out and we have plenty of freight.

Being in a union does not mean we get everything we want or get a say in EVERYTHING that goes on. Guyjax saying they all voted to let other trucks pull the freight is wrong. Thats like saying because you voted for a congressman you have agreed to everything congress does. ABF says that the extra board must be exausted before shiny wheels pull yhe freight. YRC says that if based on a 4 week average one of our drivers loses money and was available when hired transportation moved our trailers we get paid for the discrepancy. This does not mean it never happens it just means it has to be caught and a greivence filed agaisnt the company.

While its true a union may make it harder to fire an unmotivated worker it does not totally protect them, which it shouldnt. That still can be a frustration when you see someone that may not have your work ethic.

Vacation time scheduling also goes by seniority so that can be a minus, but again i do not have a problem with it. To me its a form of respect. All of my paid holidays, which includes my birthday, my benefits, my sick days, my pay rate, and the backing i have if i have an issue with my company i have because of the union and the workers that fought for those things before me. So i have no issue giving senior workers their fair place in line.

At first the biggest issue most people would have is with that seniority. But once your time is in its also one of the best advantages. There is a strange thing happening right now in union companies or at least in mine. Just a short time ago i would have had to have at least two years experience to even have a chancd to get hired. But because of so many people retiring and the company regaining freight after the merger they are hurting for drivers. This gives an opportunity to get i. Sooner and move up faster.

I try not to be union biased on these boards. But i also know that I'm 45 and have the best job of my life because of a union. Our middle class is taking it up the keister and people need to stand together even if they are not in a union. We are in an industry that is vital to our country, extremely dangerous, and workers give up time with family and friends to do this job. Yet the pay is way to low for most considering what they do and whag it costs to live on the road. I wish i had a simple answer but there isnt one.

Woody

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
member avatar

See Woody you failed to read or just did not choose to accept the fact that I did say it was my personal experience.

I never claimed all Union employees were that way. As a matter of fact I went out of the way to say that not all Union workers were like that and there were some good people in the unions. I guess you did not see that part.

Oh and I also mentioned and made it pretty clear I had no problem with unions themselves. I guess I did not make that clear enough.

You pointing out I can be an ass.... Yep I never claimed otherwise. I guess you thought that I was putting total blame on the behavior or Union drivers. I can see where you might have thought that but I never claimed to be an angel. Nope never did.

So far as escalating a situation... If there was not a situation cause in the first place then it would not be one to escalate huh?

Here is the issue where you say I escalate those situations...... If people loud talk on purpose so that I can hear it across the room and it's clear meant for me... You bet I am going to address the issue.

If you do something to the equipment that I am about to pull (it's called tampering) then heck yes I am going to raise 9 kinds of heck.

Oh I know you might say why don't I just avoid people that I may think is going to start or cause trouble.... One thing you obviously don't know. On ABF yards all outside carriers are in a different part of the lot. We are only allowed in certain areas. The very few issues that I have had ABF drivers came into these areas. I did not go to them.

Woody I am not trying to argue with you on a point by point issue. I will not. We will have to agree to disagree on the subject of union employees.

Again I will state and I want no misunderstanding as to the meaning of my words. I have zero issues with unions. None at all. But will not tolerate when someone has an issue with me and just pass on by. That is how long standing problems get started. I deal with issues as they come up.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Karl A.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Woody I have to say representation of the middle class (which is being destroyed) is at an all time high in my lifetime for sure... I agree with that perspective... I also agree with your POV on the income inequality.. How long have you been a union member Woody? How much did you know about unions before you joined one and what are the downsides you could admit to being that you are a union member?

double-quotes-end.png

Ive been a teamster for six months so I keep my eyes and ears open everyday to learn about whats going on..

My previous experience with unions was not great. I had been involved with two others. One when i was young and already had my job in construction. Due to working on some union projects i was forced to join. While i wont go into details it ended up with the union BA and I standing toe to toe ready to throw down when my boss kicked me off the job site. My boss had no issue with me or what i was saying but he had to cool things down and it had no effect on my job going forward. The other was a manufacturing job where the employees had the option of joining or not joining the union. I would have to write a book to cover all the issues with this setup.

I have no issue talking about the downsides of a union. There is good and bad, in a good union the plusses far outweighs the minusses. In a poor union you get little value for your investment. Unions go by seniority so workjng your way up can be harder. As guy mentioned to get a premium run in a union shop you have to have your time in. That being said i got a bid run after being in my company for 3 weeks. This does NOT normally happen and i expect to run the extra board after the next bid which i wont mind. When things are slow the senior drivers will be dispatched before lower drivers which i dont have a problem with. There are safeguards in place to make sure junior members still get out and we have plenty of freight.

Being in a union does not mean we get everything we want or get a say in EVERYTHING that goes on. Guyjax saying they all voted to let other trucks pull the freight is wrong. Thats like saying because you voted for a congressman you have agreed to everything congress does. ABF says that the extra board must be exausted before shiny wheels pull yhe freight. YRC says that if based on a 4 week average one of our drivers loses money and was available when hired transportation moved our trailers we get paid for the discrepancy. This does not mean it never happens it just means it has to be caught and a greivence filed agaisnt the company.

While its true a union may make it harder to fire an unmotivated worker it does not totally protect them, which it shouldnt. That still can be a frustration when you see someone that may not have your work ethic.

Vacation time scheduling also goes by seniority so that can be a minus, but again i do not have a problem with it. To me its a form of respect. All of my paid holidays, which includes my birthday, my benefits, my sick days, my pay rate, and the backing i have if i have an issue with my company i have because of the union and the workers that fought for those things before me. So i have no issue giving senior workers their fair place in line.

At first the biggest issue most people would have is with that seniority. But once your time is in its also one of the best advantages. There is a strange thing happening right now in union companies or at least in mine. Just a short time ago i would have had to have at least two years experience to even have a chancd to get hired. But because of so many people retiring and the company regaining freight after the merger they are hurting for drivers. This gives an opportunity to get i. Sooner and move up faster.

I try not to be union biased on these boards. But i also know that I'm 45 and have the best job of my life because of a union. Our middle class is taking it up the keister and people need to stand together even if they are not in a union. We are in an industry that is vital to our country, extremely dangerous, and workers give up time with family and friends to do this job. Yet the pay is way to low for most considering what they do and whag it costs to live on the road. I wish i had a simple answer but there isnt one.

Woody

Thanks Woody for the insight, I am curious about something... I met a guy who was hauling a crane that was attached to his tractor.. He told me that once he had his cdl he had joined a union and the union paid for his training to become a crane operator.. Does a union typically train people in this manor.. Also what do you call individual unions , uhm "locals" right? I had this idea after talking to this crane guy to contact the local in my area, which happens to be a teamster i believe.. I couldn't find any numbers I could reach anyone and no one returns messages.. I wanted to ask if they would do this crane thing I am interested in and I would be wanting to do this in a year or two, so I wanted to understand what I would need then so I can be prepared to apply... suggestions?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Woody's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Woody for the insight, I am curious about something... I met a guy who was hauling a crane that was attached to his tractor.. He told me that once he had his cdl he had joined a union and the union paid for his training to become a crane operator.. Does a union typically train people in this manor.. Also what do you call individual unions , uhm "locals" right? I had this idea after talking to this crane guy to contact the local in my area, which happens to be a teamster i believe.. I couldn't find any numbers I could reach anyone and no one returns messages.. I wanted to ask if they would do this crane thing I am interested in and I would be wanting to do this in a year or two, so I wanted to understand what I would need then so I can be prepared to apply... suggestions?

Yes it will be Teamsters and yes they are called locals. A search of your area will give you the local number as in Local 135 or something like that. I know the unions do some training but I have no idea about any of the details. Your on the right track by trying to contact them and ask questions if your interested.

Woody

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Woody's Comment
member avatar

Guy I did see that you went out of your way to say not all of us are bad, but it was a small snippet that followed a large column saying we are all bad. Sort of like building a big poo poo sundae, then coming back to place a cherry on top. While I can appreciate the sentiment of the cherry, its still a bowl of poo poo.

You also said "The unions themselves.... They will die out without my help" which implies you would help them die but no help needed. I don't know how this would not be translated as you don't like unions but maybe I missed something.

My issue was you basically said as fact that everyone voted to have outside trucks allowed in and happily signed the contract then changed their minds. That's obviously not the case as you can attest by your own experience.

Here's the deal. Even though it states that no hired transportation will pull freight unless the extra board is exhausted this does not mean that the company wont push the issue and see if it gets caught and a grievance filed. But lets assume that everyone is working at the terminal you picked up from. You run teams which more than likely means some if not all the time you will be passing terminals that the freight would normally stop in. There is a good chance there are drivers that depend on that through freight for work. So yes, even though the contract is as stated it can still take loads away from members. I point this out because that means hired transportation then becomes a threat to the workers. And this is where my total confusion of your stance applies.

They see it as a potential threat and react. Then you come on here basically saying they are all cry baby bullies trying to spill your milk and giving you attitude. But you get worked up over phone calls and parking spaces and react. Then come on here posting like its a victory and looking for applause. It just strikes me as hypocritical.

I am in NO way condoning or agreeing with any attitude they may give you. While it does grind my gears when I see outside help on our lot my issue is with the union not the drivers. So my complaints go to my union steward not to the hired help. Unfortunately not everyone shares my opinion or has my self control. Again not making excuses for them its just the way it is. Based on your posts and your personality I would bet that if you saw something that you could consider a threat to you or your brothers lively hood you would probably react as well. Maybe not exactly the same way but as you say you would not just let it pass you by. I would not say you are a piece of crap for doing so, I'd say your human. All I'm saying is you are harshly judging them on a situation that if rolls were reversed you may handle in a similar manor.

Opinions run deep and strong when it comes to union talk. And yes we will just agree to disagree. As I said in the other thread I have not always cared for unions and still do not agree with every little thing that happens. I was almost in a fist fight with a union BA when I was younger. Apparently when your toe to toe and you tell him you don't want to be associated with his lazy ass union workers he tends to take it personally, turns beat red, and his eyes roll back in his head. So I am not without understanding of your stance. But your stance just seemed like it was really strong without consideration of where they are coming from. Maybe I had it wrong.

Woody

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Page 2 of 4 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Choosing A Trucking Company Driver Responsibilities Hard Lessons Learned The Economy And Politics Truck Driving Lifestyle Trucking News
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More