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Sharaya M.'s Comment
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Hey there, This is my first foray into the forum section and I'm happy to see Brett has provided the Ladies with a separate forum. I'm venturing into the world of LTD (Lady Truck Drivers). Hehehehe.... sounds like a new 12-step program or something. :) While studying Brett's interactive CDL course, I have found it to be thorough (frustratingly so at times). However, it would be nice if a diagram of a dolly would be included. Thus far, I can only vaguely imagine what a pintle lock may look like. I've seen various forms when I've googled the term, but still uncertain which one is associated with a dolly/fifth wheel. Anyone have a suggested link/s for a good pic/diagram? Sh'a

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Starcar's Comment
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OK...I'll try to explain...but first understand that a 5th wheel "hitch" and a pintle "hitch" are 2 different ways of hooking up to a trailer. You will never see a pintle hitch on a OTR truck and trailer, unless its a multiple trailer set up.. They are mainly used in industrial, and agricultural applications. But in the application of an over the road multi trailer hookup, heres how it looks. The truck's 5th wheel hitch is locked under the front of the first trailer. At the back of that first trailer, theres a BIG loop. The Dolly (which is just an axle with a set of dual tires)has a big jaw loop on the front ( it looks kinda like a round lobster claw).That locks the dolly to the first trailer.There will be a 5th wheel plate sitting on top of the tandem axle on the dolly. That will lock the dolly to the next trailer.(This is a set of "Doubles", to make it a triple, you add one more dolly and one more trailer). I don't know where you'd find a diagram. But if you have a truck stop near you, cruise thru and keep a watch for a Conway, FedEx, UPS, truck, pulling 2 or more trailers. I'm sure you can walk by and take a look, and if the driver is visible, I'm sure he will explain how the application works.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

David's Comment
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I was lurking around reading and thought id share this..I find pictures easier to understand sometimes...

model of trucking dolly with pintle lock

Basically the same as what star said.. the pintle lock is on the end of the first trailer, the dolly's loop will connect into that locking the two together, then you slide the 2nd 5th wheel under your next trailer, repeat for a 3rd trailer.... not all trailers have the pintle lock. from what I've seen a lot of trucks will have them too.

Hope that helps a bit.

Starcar's Comment
member avatar

Thank You David !!! I'm surprised they even teach the pintle system. But the more you learn the less that will confuse you. I have had to mess with pintles doing farm hauling...they can be a real pain on a slope, or in the mud....

Sharaya M.'s Comment
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Thank you both. These responses along with the pic have cleared up the niggly little missing piece. Thanks also for the suggestion to visit my local truck stop. I hadn't thought about that one. What a great resource! thank-you.gifthank-you.gifthank-you.gif

David's Comment
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Your welcome to both of you... Things get easier down the road. you'll learn something new each day....

One other example of a pintle is dump trucks (not the big yellow ones.. our type truck) with trailers.. They have the first bucket on the frame and then the trailer connects to the back via pintle.

Cindy B.'s Comment
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That picture is wonderful!!!! you all were explaining and I tried to get a picture in my head but it didnt come close to what it looks like. that would be a good picture to have for a new part of the training on here, just a thought, but I think it would be very helpful

Sharaya 's Comment
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Whew. Passed the exam yesterday smile.gif The lady at the exam site got a little nervous when I told her I wanted to take multiple tests all at once. Then she was shocked when I came back within about 30 minutes and told her I was done and that I had passed them. She said they had only had one other person to do that within about 5 years. Thank you Brett dancing.gif I studied the High Road course over and over. There were some specific questions about railroad crossings on a dirt road that I hadn't encountered, but I made good guesses. Your course is top notch in my book! Hoping to begin practical training within 2 weeks. Packing time for now. Anybody have a good brand recommendation and where-to-buy info for some of that dry shampoo?

Starcar's Comment
member avatar

I have never used the dry shampoo. But I don't have any oil in my hair, so it never gets stringy looking. In fact, I use "Silk" to add some oil to my hair. Some of the ladies were talking about using baby powder, or Talc powder, for dry shampoo. I have used baby shampoo on our truck dog, rather than bathe him in the cold hose outside... He didn't mind at all, and he smelled good too !!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jennifer L.'s Comment
member avatar

Whew. Passed the exam yesterday smile.gif The lady at the exam site got a little nervous when I told her I wanted to take multiple tests all at once. Then she was shocked when I came back within about 30 minutes and told her I was done and that I had passed them. She said they had only had one other person to do that within about 5 years. Thank you Brett dancing.gif I studied the High Road course over and over. There were some specific questions about railroad crossings on a dirt road that I hadn't encountered, but I made good guesses. Your course is top notch in my book! Hoping to begin practical training within 2 weeks. Packing time for now. Anybody have a good brand recommendation and where-to-buy info for some of that dry shampoo?

You can find dry shampoos at drug stores but the ones in the "pharmacy" area tend to smell medicinal.

I have seen advertisements for a new dry shampoo from Tres Seme' (sp?), I have used their wet products before and been satisfied, maybe give it a try and let us know your results please?

Jen

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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