Leaving For Prime Training Saturday, Some Questions

Topic 6483 | Page 2

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Brian M.'s Comment
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This is a great video! Thank you for bringing to our attention. Even though its a little long it really gives you great detail and is going to be part of my training exercises before class starts on the 5th. brian

Mad Hatter's Comment
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Haha yeah i know its a long video, unfortunately that's how long it is when youre walking around learning it and when you're testing on it. But when you're in your own truck it will be a lot easier. Which reminds me just remember not all truck/ trailers are the same. Some semi trailers are without abs. Some trucks have gear driven or belt driven engine components (the alternator, water pump, air compressor, gear box* ) i just started myself so there might be more or less that i forgot.

And the acronyms that Road Hog mentioned are really important too. When you do the break lining think DOG dirt oil grease. ( i would check to make sure there is no dirt, oil, our grease.) Lol

Front tires are no less then 3/32nds debt, no recaps allowed.

The other tires are no less then 2/32nds. Recaps allowed.

You would check tire stems with a air pressure gauge.

Serpentine belt is no more then 1/4" of play (im not confident in my answer.)

Break lining is no less then 1/4"

Marker lights shine

Flashers flash

Clearance lights are white in color

Marker lights are yellow

When you're doing the the air check proper level is between 100 psi to 120 psi. Your buzzar and indicator will come on at 60 psi. And the spring breaks will come on between 20 and 45.

The fire extinguisher needs to be rated 5 bcu for non hazardous material, 10 bcu if you're carrying hazardous material. It needs to be fully charged, mounted, and it must have a gauge.

You need three reflective triangles.

Spare electrical fuses.

*Again i just finished so if your instructor says different follow them. I'm pretty confident in my info, but maybe I'm mixing things up. There's a lot of information you have to know. Break it down you have a long time to remember everything. If you haven't gotten your permit yet don't worry about this yet. Read the tool on this site. (I don't know what it's called.) And grab the book from your dmv/Secretary of state. You won't need this until after you get the tip

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Chance H.'s Comment
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I actually didn't get my permit yet been too busy maintaining my full time job to provide a nest egg for my family I'm basically pretty well studied and ready besides that after talking in depth with my recruiter we both agreed that it would be easier to just get it in MO. I have finalized my DOT med form today and am heading out after I get off of work this evening. So I look forward to seeing you guys up there and wish everyone heading into this new training and adventure the best of luck.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Matthew W.'s Comment
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Good Luck to you guys that are heading out to Springfield MO for the class starting on the 15th. I won't be there until Jan 5th :( .

DesertWarrior505 's Comment
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Good Luck to you guys that are heading out to Springfield MO for the class starting on the 15th. I won't be there until Jan 5th :( .

Bummer your not making the class.

Brian M.'s Comment
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Good Luck to you guys that are heading out to Springfield MO for the class starting on the 15th. I won't be there until Jan 5th :( .

Just think Matthew, no holidays to interfere with our training, plus added bonus of being home for Christmas. I'm kind of glad we aren't starting till the 5th

Deb R.'s Comment
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Note to Armando: steer tires need minimum 4/32" tread depth.

"(b) Any tire on the front wheels of a bus, truck, or truck tractor shall have a tread groove pattern depth of at least 4⁄32 of an inch when measured at any point on a major tread groove. The measurements shall not be made where tie bars, humps, or fillets are located." (Quote from FMSCA reg. § 393.75: Tires)

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Daniel B.'s Comment
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When talking about the tread depth, make sure you say "of an inch".

Next I am going to check the tread depth of my steer tires, it should be 4/32 of an inch.

Mad Hatter's Comment
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Yeah that makes sense Deb. I knew there would be some things i would mix up. Thank you. :-)

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