Trucking Truth CDL Training?

Topic 7410 | Page 1

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Jeff L.'s Comment
member avatar

I just want to suggest to anyone going to school or are training for CDL to use the training materials that are provided by Trucking Truth. It will put you farther ahead than all the others in your classes rather than using some of the other study guides out there. Keep in mind you should also study from from your states handbook also since each state varies. Like here in Texas the width could be 102 inches(eight and a half feet) rather than 8'6" on all interstates or 14 foot clearance etc. Also helps to have updated CDL handbook since things are added or changed like Texting and Cell phone use, etc.

The studies here have helped me with really understanding rather than just cramming information sorta like having those little eureka moments, understanding the application rather than just going through the movements. It has made my learning much easier and I am grateful to this site, and Mr. Aquila. Thanks to all those who have shared their experiences also.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

I just want to suggest to anyone going to school or are training for CDL to use the materials that is provided by Trucking Truth. It will put you farther ahead than all the others in your classes rather than using some of the other study guides out there. Keep in mind you should also study from from your states handbook also since each state varies. Like here in Texas the width could be 102 inches(eight and a half feet) rather than 8'6" on all interstates or 14 foot clearance etc. Also helps to have updated CDL handbook since things are added or changed like Texting and Cell phone use, etc.

The studies here have helped me with really understanding rather than just cramming information sorta like having those little eureka moments, understanding the application rather than just going through the movements. It has made my learning much easier and I am grateful to this site, and Mr. Aquila. Thanks to all those who have shared their experiences also.

Errr - 102 inches IS 8'6"

And FMCSA Mobile Phone Restrictions, are Federal Regs - which pretty much outlaw having one in your hand (much less texting) while operating a CMV - and the PENALTIES ARE SEVERE.

And the TT CDL Tutorials are THE BOMB. I drill them regularly, just to stay sharp.

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Hey keep at it Jeff! I see right now you're 64% of the way through our High Road Training Program with a 98% average. That's awesome! That's how you do it. Get through that entire program. You're going to be soooo glad you did.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Ryan S.'s Comment
member avatar

I was just showing the President of the school I'm at your program. I must say, he was thoroughly impressed. It definitely is the reason I easily passed my written exams!

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I was just showing the President of the school I'm at your program. I must say, he was thoroughly impressed. It definitely is the reason I easily passed my written exams!

Hey congrats on passing the exams and thanks a ton for showing it off like that!

smile.gif

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Ryan S.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I was just showing the President of the school I'm at your program. I must say, he was thoroughly impressed. It definitely is the reason I easily passed my written exams!

double-quotes-end.png

Hey congrats on passing the exams and thanks a ton for showing it off like that!

smile.gif

No problem! Thank you for the work you've put into the program. I'd have to say that it's the most comprehensive training program ive found online yet. It seemed the people at my school agreed!

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Jeff L.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey keep at it Jeff! I see right now you're 64% of the way through our High Road Training Program with a 98% average. That's awesome! That's how you do it. Get through that entire program. You're going to be soooo glad you did.

Yes Sir, I plan to. I am going over some of them over and over right now to refresh. I have my permit which in Texas you only have to take Combination vehicles and Special requirements and am going in this morning to finish required written test and also Doubles and triples along with tankers. My classroom grades have not been below a 96 yet due to some slippery trick questions. I am lucky to have a week during spring break to study HazMat and other courses. It will give me time to read Bumper to Bumper also. Some of the other students are just trying to learn enough to pass instead of really applying themselves and they will do alright probably, except even if I am a little too gung ho i want to study everything I can now whie I have the chance. Thanks for all the info here. Even one of the recruiters or reps said that the industry is not driver friendly, so i need all the help I can get out there.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

J. Snow's Comment
member avatar

I started the training here yesterday. And did Page one. Great, then I hit return to dashboard, and started on what I thought was the next step-finished that and thought-wow this is going really fast. THEN I realized I hadn't opened up to see the other pages in the first chapter! #facepalm LOL All good. I'm not starting school until the 9th so I'll have a lot of time to keep plugging away!

Jeff L.'s Comment
member avatar

I started the training here yesterday. And did Page one. Great, then I hit return to dashboard, and started on what I thought was the next step-finished that and thought-wow this is going really fast. THEN I realized I hadn't opened up to see the other pages in the first chapter! #facepalm LOL All good. I'm not starting school until the 9th so I'll have a lot of time to keep plugging away!

Keep it up! Most of the students in my class are having problems comprehending application of what is being taught. If you Study here and study out of your State Handbook you will be better equipped when school comes around. I took all the test at my local D.P.S today plus Tankers and Doubles and the only one I had any real problem with was the General Knowledge, not because I do not know the answers but because the wording of the questions were in a different form than I was used to. They want to know if you really understand or if your are just going through the motions. Some in my class did not pass Special Requirements and Combination Vehicles in order to get their permits so it is important that you really study your states Special Requirements since every state has differences. I aced Doubles and only got one wrong on Tankers and most of my studying was here for those two. I passed them all, but General Knowledge did make me sweat it. There will be two answers that will seem right and you have to really look at the questioning . It takes Comprehension, so you really need to want to know why something works the way it does and why it is important to follow certain regulations. Dont just study, Live it! Good Luck! Hope to see you out there !

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

You have to WATCH THE WORDING of the question. This is as much about ATTENTION TO DETAIL - as it is the CORRECT ANSWER.

Many questions are formed as a NEGATIVE - "the correct way to do such and such is EXCEPT" - which is looking for the WRONG WAY to do it in the answer. The mind will breeze right by this and choose the CORRECT (right way) as the answer - BZZZZT.

Wrong Answer.

This is what trips me up the most on these tests. Read the QUESTION CAREFULLY.

I drill the High Road Training Program regularly. Where I get hung up and halted - is when I GO TOO FAST, and don't read the question completely.

I paid for 2 different programs in '09 - as Brett didn't have the CDL Training Program online at the time. His FREE PROGRAM, is worlds better than the ones I PAID FOR.

Mainly - BECAUSE OF THE REVIEW QUESTIONS on each quiz - and BECAUSE it halts you in problem areas and forces you to CONTINUE DRILLING those areas.

But the biggest key to getting this - is to SLOW DOWN AND READ THE QUESTIONS.

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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