Getting CDL In FL And Then Transferring To NY?

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Amanda D.'s Comment
member avatar

Sorry that I keep blowing up these boards. Hubby is determined to get his CDL ASAP and neither of us know anything about the trucking industry. Obviously the recruiters aren't going to give it to us straight. I don't know where else to turn for the million questions I have, especially since our situation is kinda convoluted.

Hubby is a recent immigrant to the US, getting his GC and US Class E DL late last year. He's looking for jobs and became focused on trucking as a well-paid job that doesn't require tons of time and money for schooling. I don't want him to go OTR so he'd be looking at local and regional jobs only. I've read a few accounts of truckers here who got LTL jobs right out of school.

We live in FL but are planning to move to move to NYC. I have all my career contacts there and I'm up for a job there (used to live there). It also seems that he'd have better luck getting LTL being based in the NE/Eastern seaboard.

In NY there is a requirement that a potential driver hold a US Class E for a year before getting a CDL Class A. Apparently in FL there is no such requirement. He wouldn't have to wait a year in FL to go for his CDL.

A recruiter he talked to the other day recommended that he A) go to CDL school and get his CDL in FL, then B) move to NYC and transfer his CDL there, then C) get a job.

Hubby thinks that's a great plan. I'm skeptical. For one, I'm worried that the NY DMV and/or companies see that as trying to bypass certain requirements they set in place for a reason and that would not reflect well on him. The second worry I have is how would he be able to get any pre-hires this way? I mean, I wouldn't think that NY companies would issue pre-hire letters to a guy doing his CDL in FL who isn't qualified to get his CDL in NY yet.

So do you think this get CDL in FL/transfer to NY/bypassing the one-year requirement is a viable plan at all? Or would he be better off waiting out the year until he can get his CDL in NY?

We're planning on calling potential companies tomorrow to see what they say. But I wanted to put it out here since I know I can get good, honest advice here.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Pre-hires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Heavy C's Comment
member avatar

First Amanda don't worry about loading up the board with questions. That's why we're here, it's to make sure people get all the information they need before making the jump into this industry. Do ask as many questions add your need to.

Now to address what you asked. First thing about recruiters. Yes they aren't always the best at telling the whole truth. There job is to bring in drivers so if they stretch the truth a little to get a recruit then it was worth it. Now they aren't always going to lie to you and they can be very good places to get information. Just don't rely on them solely.

Next question. I'm very much a walking case of yes you can go local right out of school. There are a few different types of jobs you can look into. LTL , food service, and many other small companies that deliver within their own company. The key point for finding something local is location. Where you will be moving to NYC I would imagine there would be no shortage of opportunities. Especially in food/beverage delivery. Think coca cola, sysco, us foods, or any alcohol distributor. What you really want to start doing is scouring the job boards for that area and see what's out there. If something looks interesting then make some calls and find out if they will hire without that needed experience. Be prepared because most if not all companies will advertise they want experience but don't let that deter you. Apply to any and all local jobs that look like a good job. Just don't think that it can't be done because it certainly can and myself and 6string are proof.

Now as far as the transferring licence thing. I can't really say if that will or will not work. The thing that would worry is that if N.Y. Looks at the previous driving record and see it doesn't meet their criteria for obtaining a class A. Best bet would be to call and ask. It's not like if they say no you can't attempt it anyway. They'll never know it was you that called. I just can't say with any certainty yes or no. If no then just wait it out. Either way he should be able to get into trucking and get a job that works for both of you. Just don't lose hope and keep at it.

Good luck

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

N.Y is going to get his driving transcripts from FLORIDA.

Florida is going to show WHEN he was issued his Class E - and WHEN he was issued his Class A.

If his TOTAL LICENSURE in the US is LESS THAN ONE YEAR - N.Y. will PROBABLY NOT ALLOW THE TRANSFER of his Florida CDL - and when you move and he goes to transfer his drivers license (which you have to do when you CHANGE YOUR ADDRESS - which BY LAW HAS TO BE DONE IN 10 DAYS), they will likely DOWNGRADE HIM TO A CLASS E, until he has a total of ONE YEARS LICENSURE, in order to meet their requirements.

You would be best to CONTACT NY DMV with this scenario - but it seems like you're looking for a way to "beat the system" - and there MAY NOT BE ONE - short of putting off the NY move - until he has a year on his license - OR - waiting for a year of licensure before getting his CDL.

EVEN IF HE GOT a Florida CDL AND got a job while living in Florida - NY STILL might not let him transfer his CDL, if his transcripts showed less than a year of US Licensure.

This is similar to an experience I had when I was a teenager. Had a Florida DL at 16 - took a road trip to NY to visit friends. Got pulled over, and the cop wigged out, because NY minimum DL age was 18 at the time. I had a valid DL, insurance and a car registered in my name - so he cut me loose, but told me - "in theory", he could have arrested me and towed my car - because I was NOT LEGAL TO DRIVE in NY at 16 years old.

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Amanda D.'s Comment
member avatar

Rick, that was my basic feeling on the matter. We will be making calls to both the FL and NY DMVs tomorrow to get the whole story straight.

Heavy, would you mind telling me what you made as a local driver your first year? I've heard so many variations there. And is local and P&D the same thing?

Thank you so much everybody!

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Rick, that was my basic feeling on the matter. We will be making calls to both the FL and NY DMVs tomorrow to get the whole story straight.

Heavy, would you mind telling me what you made as a local driver your first year? I've heard so many variations there. And is local and P&D the same thing?

Thank you so much everybody!

Not to butt into HC's reply.

Local and P&D are usually similar. P&D means "Pickup & Delivery" - where you are usually leaving a local terminal with LTL (less than truckload) loads, and delivering to a number of local/regional stops. You may also be picking up (after empty) at a number of local/regional stops to return to the terminal to be "forwarded on" to it's destination.

There are also (usually) a number of local/P&D jobs available for Food & Beverage Distributors. A lot of these typically require unloading and stocking at local supermarkets (for example).

Most of these companies "hire from within", meaning you usually work the docks, loading/unloading trucks - and eventually apply to train for a driving position as they become available - though some companies will hire "off the street" (for experienced drivers) or recent CDL school graduates.

The only thing you can really do, is look around to see who's around - and - APPLY APPLY APPLY.

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

P & D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Heavy C's Comment
member avatar

Hey Amanda. I started with a small sporting goods retailer that runs stores out of the northeast. When I say small I mean they have less than twenty drivers with less than 10 tractors. It's very small as trucking companies go. I started at 17.00 an hour with overtime after 40. I usually end up with close to 50hours a week. I've already gotten. A raise of .68 cents plus a end of year bonus. Needless to say I ended up with a great local company to start my career with. Finding a job like this is rare so I wouldn't hold out for something like this. LTL companies may be the better overall choice because there's many to choose from and they are much more likely to have positions open. Look into companies like Old dominion, YRC, Conway, Estes, etc. But like I said before stay looking now even if you can't transfer your license yet. Get feelers out there on who will take you on as a rookie. Sure you can find something.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Amanda D.'s Comment
member avatar

Well, I didn't get the job in NYC I was up for. Hubby and I are talking about staying in FL for an extra year so he can get his CDL and start saving $$$. We've looked around and there's local jobs in the bigger cities like Miami, Orlando, Tampa, Jacksonville. He called down a short list of LTL companies yesterday and got a positive response from Conway. Good starting pay too. I know 6 string loves working for OD but we weren't able to get in touch with anyone there so far. I also looked at some driving jobs for grocery stores and oh man they are stringent. Publix requires 8-10 YEARS in entry-level work before someone can drive trucks for them. Craaaazy.

Now, we are researching and calling private schools. It seems to me that schools connected to technical colleges have the best funding opportunities. What should our next step be at this point? Secure pre-hires , a spot in school or should hubby study more before we do that? How long should it take someone to do the High Road Program, especially if he is not a native English speaker? Hubby wants to get to work yesterday, but I keep telling him we need more time to research and prepare.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Pre-hires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Well, I didn't get the job in NYC I was up for. Hubby and I are talking about staying in FL for an extra year so he can get his CDL and start saving $$$. We've looked around and there's local jobs in the bigger cities like Miami, Orlando, Tampa, Jacksonville. He called down a short list of LTL companies yesterday and got a positive response from Conway. Good starting pay too. I know 6 string loves working for OD but we weren't able to get in touch with anyone there so far. I also looked at some driving jobs for grocery stores and oh man they are stringent. Publix requires 8-10 YEARS in entry-level work before someone can drive trucks for them. Craaaazy.

Now, we are researching and calling private schools. It seems to me that schools connected to technical colleges have the best funding opportunities. What should our next step be at this point? Secure pre-hires , a spot in school or should hubby study more before we do that? How long should it take someone to do the High Road Program, especially if he is not a native English speaker? Hubby wants to get to work yesterday, but I keep telling him we need more time to research and prepare.

First of all, if you can get on with Con-way or any LTL company then go for it. Great companies to work for.

The schools connected with Tech Colleges tend to have the best prices for sure. I'm not sure if they have more funding available or not. That would depend on whether or not they're providing any funding themselves and whether or not the course qualifies for Federal Aid. The only way it would qualify for Federal Aid right now is if they extended the length of the schooling significantly. There are a few places that do this in the country and their courses are like 6 months long. But for sure the Tech Colleges tend to have the best pricing.

I think getting through the High Road Training Program for someone who isn't a native English speaker is going to take a pretty good bit of time. Probably figure on 60-80 hours I would say to complete the entire thing.

I would say let him get rolling a bit on the High Road while you continue to do research. Keep contacting companies to see what local/regional opportunities you can dig up and see if you can get some pre-hires. Also, look into funding options if you guys can't afford the schooling up front. I wouldn't bother applying to any schools until you have secured at least two or three pre-hires for jobs you'd be interested in. Once you're confident he'll be able to secure the type of job you guys would like to have there in Florida then go ahead and start applying to schools and start applying for funding.

Look into the WIA Program (Workforce Investment Act). A lot of people get their entire CDL training paid for with a grant through WIA. They don't even have to pay it back.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Pre-hires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Amanda D.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you so much for the reply and for this site! It's been a great resource since we were coming from knowing nothing about the industry. We've been doing more research, although we took a short break when we had family over. He applied at Conway and Lowes for Delivery positions. We looked on the OD website and they list jobs but no link to apply. I guess you just call and express your interest???? Oh and we spoke to two tech colleges with reasonable prices and solid curriculums. So we're making progress.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

The Dude's Comment
member avatar

Jacksonville is the area I'm targeting to relocate to and work local after a little while. It's a strong area for a professional driver. Lot's of local work and very affordable living. I've been following the job situation there closely and I would say you guys have a great situation right in your back yard. There's always work there hauling containers from the port. Most of the big LTL carriers who will hire new drivers have terminals there. Jax just seems like a hot spot for CDL work and if you consider it's location and how nobody wants to go deep into FL, it's one of the four corners of product movement in this country.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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