Female Truck Driver Safety

Topic 8008 | Page 2

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Old School's Comment
member avatar

Deb, you are going through the same thing that many of us went through when we decided to get into trucking. Usually the people who we are close to don't really understand anything about trucking and whatever fears and misunderstandings they have about it are based on false premises or prejudices of society. While I find it a rewarding career, it is looked down upon by many people in our society.

For the most part the trucking community has itself to blame for this. Truck drivers are such a loose coalition of individuals that there is a huge diversity of folks out here. It always seems that a few low-lifes have the power to give the many professional individuals out here a bad name in society. I have no idea what it is like to be a lady truck driver, but I do know that there are a lot of them. I treat them all with respect, and for the most part I have witnessed the other male drivers out here doing the same. I'm sure they have a few run ins with some ignorant fools every now and then, but for the most part you will be just fine out here. Most of us are all looking out for one another in some form or fashion.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Mike R.'s Comment
member avatar

If I had a daughter going out to be an OTR truck driver, I will tell her to start her driving day early and shut down early, when you can get a good parking spot, in a well viewed, well lit area. I would also have her keep a dash cam, plus a wider angle cam going at all times and post signs on the truck, making it clear everything around the truck was under video surveillance. Whistle on the key chain, cell phone in hand when walking around, truck stops or otherwise.

If she did that, and used basic common sense about security that all drivers should use, I would feel comfortable with her being out on the road.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Papa Bird's Comment
member avatar

My two cents may only be worth that, but here are mine. A gun is a big no, even if you have a concealed carry doesn't mean it's valid in the state your in, stun gun, well some states are making it illegal to own or use, pepper spray, colder weather can be an enemy to there effective use. Personally, a cheap and effective weapon for defence, a wire coat hanger, hit someone with one of those folded and they will be wishing that they had thought twice about messing with you, plus it will mark them, it's easy to carry, (even concealed) and it's a light quick weapon, that would not be easily taken away. Also, big plus, legal in all states, it's a freaking coat hanger.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
ColeTrucker's Comment
member avatar

Wasp spray. Better aim and price. I'm a night driver so Walmart, home depot, Sam's are my spots. I ALWAYS park next to other trucks. If all else fails and stuff just ain't sitting right, I'll park under a spotlight at the closest bank (cameras) and call non emergency pd to let them know exactly where I'm am. They'll either move me or keep me company. My family always knows b/c we use Life 360. Cole.

ColeTrucker's Comment
member avatar

If all else fails and stuff just ain't sitting right, I'll park under a spotlight at the closest bank (cameras) and call non emergency pd to let them know exactly where I'm am. Cole.

And he'll yeah, I'll use my girl power voice to make sh*t work for me when I need to. Grandma didn't raise no fool. Cole

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Patricia M.'s Comment
member avatar

My family has concerns about me be safe. Not only driving but at truck stops, along the highway and staying by myself. Btw I am a female. Tell me what you guys think. Is this something I need to be concerned about? Do I need to carry a gun for safety?

Guns are a big NO NO! But there are things you can carry with you that will protect you should the need arise. 1) Keys: Your truck keys are a wonderful weapon. Position them in your hand with the "key part" sticking out. One swipe across the face will cause enough hurt for you to run away.

2) Tire Thumper: Tire Thumpers come in all shapes and sizes. I prefer the ones with a steel shank down the middle. One crack to the head and your attacker is down. (Quite possibly for good)

3) Simple Ratchet Strap: Ratchet straps work great to secure your doors.

Here a few simple tips that will also keep you safe: Rest Area's At Night: Parking only. Do not get out of your truck. Close the curtains and go to sleep. If you must use the restroom before day-break use your keys or tire thumper as a safety measure. Truck Stops At Night: Pull through the fuel Island before parking, go in use the restroom, get a snack, etc... then park close your curtains and go to sleep. Road side parking area's (Texas and Mississippi) Park your truck, close the curtains and go to sleep.

One thing you must not do as a woman trucker: Live in fear. If you do, you will be miserable, and you will not be successful. Take control, hold your head up, demand respect. You belong out there as much as anyone else. Happy trucking Trish

Ace's Comment
member avatar

First time making a comment on the forum (at least, I think I figured out how). All of the responses to this post are reassuring. I start training with a company next week. All of the blogs here have been super informative. Many thanks to all so have contributed. :)

My family has concerns about me be safe. Not only driving but at truck stops, along the highway and staying by myself. Btw I am a female. Tell me what you guys think. Is this something I need to be concerned about? Do I need to carry a gun for safety?

Todd Holmes's Comment
member avatar

Im a female getting ready to start driving and most companies will not let you have a weapon. So with that in mind I went and did the research and found a few companies that allow you to have a dog

What about a police taser or a stun gun?

Todd Holmes's Comment
member avatar

My two cents may only be worth that, but here are mine. A gun is a big no, even if you have a concealed carry doesn't mean it's valid in the state your in, stun gun, well some states are making it illegal to own or use, pepper spray, colder weather can be an enemy to there effective use. Personally, a cheap and effective weapon for defence, a wire coat hanger, hit someone with one of those folded and they will be wishing that they had thought twice about messing with you, plus it will mark them, it's easy to carry, (even concealed) and it's a light quick weapon, that would not be easily taken away. Also, big plus, legal in all states, it's a freaking coat hanger.

Being a life member of Gun Owners of America you know how I feel about anti-gun attitudes.

I would rather be armed with something more formidable than a coat hanger if some 400-pound linebacker of a thug were attacking me. Even pepper spray.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Tasrers, stun guns and even pepper spray are illegal in some states.

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