First DIspatch!

Topic 8140 | Page 1

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Caleb A.'s Comment
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Yesterday, the day after Easter, I get a call from my FM. She tells me I am to pick up a rental car from Appleton, WI and go to a tiny town about an hour east of Green Bay to pick up another trainee. They haven't acquired a trainer for me yet but should have one for each of us when we get to Gary, IN. She is loading money on my EFS card for fuel in the rental and I will be paid for my drive time. My only problem with this is I have no opportunity to talk with my trainer about how much/what kind of food stuff to bring. I am fully aware of spacial issues due to living arrangements, Lol, also school school has left me about broke. I'm planning on a few essentials like a few packs of ramen, a couple of jars of peanut butter, bread, crackers and a few cans of revenge...I mean beans. :) any other suggestions guys?

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Jeffry T.'s Comment
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I work for Roehl and when I was with my trainer everything I brought stayed with me on my bunk bags equipment everything so pack as light as you can sucks but it is what it is.

Jeffry T.'s Comment
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Also they gave me a 25 dollar a day advance while I was with my trainer that I didn't have to pay back.

PJ's Comment
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Congrats on getting to this point. Ditto on packing light. Everything will be on your bunk. It sure sucks you are going into the terminal , without a trainer in place. Keep the faith and stay relaxed. Sometimes things just happen. Remember they already have a certain investment in you and they will get you with a trainer as quickly as possible. Best wishes to you

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Caleb A.'s Comment
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Thanks guys. They called me shortly after this post and gave me a list of things to bring, as well as told me about the $25 per day advance program. I believe I will be fine now. I happy that I have made it this far and am thankful for all the advice and help from this site and will continue to turn here for further questions that I'm sure will arise

Patricia M.'s Comment
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Thanks guys. They called me shortly after this post and gave me a list of things to bring, as well as told me about the $25 per day advance program. I believe I will be fine now. I happy that I have made it this far and am thankful for all the advice and help from this site and will continue to turn here for further questions that I'm sure will arise

If your trainer is worth his/her salt, you should not have to bring any food stuffs along at all. Trainers know and understand that you have very little if anything to contribute your first 2 weeks on the truck. Your trainer is there to help you, and most will, even if food comes from the dollar menu, they won't let you go hungry. Not sure what is on the list that you received from your company, but everything you need should fit in a large duffel and a smaller "shower" bag. With the exception of your pillow and bedding. (sleeping bag, or sheet and blanket) BEWARE! if your company "gives" you money and calls it an advance, you will have to pay it back. It will be taken from your paycheck 25.00 doesn't seem like much, but when you are only making training pay, after taxes and advances you run the risk of being in the hole. (been there done that) I wish I could see the list they gave you. As a former trainer myself, I can help you make sure you have exactly what you need and what you do not. If your list came from a fleet manager well most of them have never set foot in a truck much less understand what you will and will not need while on the road. Here are a couple of tips that will save you in the long run. 1) Do not buy anything from a truck stop if you can help it. Food, coffee and snacks are extremely over priced. If you are a coffee drinker get a canister of instant, "make your coffee" in the truck, then use the hot water from the truck stop. My husband and I did this for years until we purchased a microwave for our truck. We saved a ton of money on coffee alone. Most trainers have a refrigerator and microwave on their truck and keep a goodly store of sandwich/microwave foods. This will save you tons of money, money that you can keep in your pocket for a rainy day, or money you can send home to the family (if you have one)

2) Always make a list and commit to sticking to it before going shopping for necessities. By doing this you will not end up with excess "stuff" in your cart. Impulse purchases that do nothing but eat your money, and you will spend less time wandering around the store. A list will allow you to get in and get out quickly with the least possible money spent. Most trainers are keen on splitting the cost of food down the middle. That way neither of you are footing the total bill, and neither of you will go hungry :D

3) If you smoke, stop. Tobacco and tobacco products do nothing but ruin your health and your pocket book. The average cost for a pack of smokes is around 6.00 depending on where you are. In the North East they are as much as 12.00 per pack. 6.00 will buy snacks, a pack of socks, a pack of gloves, soap... you get the idea. . 4) RELAX!! you are about to begin the greatest journey of your life. Happy trucking. Keep the dirty side down and ROLL ON!! Trish

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

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