In Cab Cooking And Nature's Calling

Topic 8470 | Page 1

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Spanky FKA A.Meggs's Comment
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So as I am working to get my "foot in the door" I have had alot of friends and family ask about eating (although I'm thinking of cooking in cab if possible to save my hard earned money) as well as potty time. It seems to me alot of you use George Foremans and skillets but my main concern is the best way to go about keeping everything clean. I'm certain "fine China" is a big part of the in cab cooking budget but last I checked GF and skillets aren't made of plastic :) Sorry to bring this up after getting your belly grunting but next would be natures calling. Of course we all want to keep the wheels and miles rolling but when u REALLY have to go and can't stop. I'm all ears first any tips, tricks of the trade or ideas that come to mind. I am an excellent cook at home and I'm sure I can be otr (at least I think I could do as good as alot of truck stops, and I've heard of course everything starts tasting the same) Also open for any quick meals that come to mind. Thanks to you all and be safe.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Errol V.'s Comment
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Cooking: Fry pan inside is not a good idea - no ventilation. Though the idea of a bacon fragrance all the time might sound good, try to keep the inside clean. I have heard of drivers that might cook on the cat walk. You will find mini-stoves running on propane at truck stops. (Walmart can get you a better price!). Flame, in my opinion, always packs better heat than electric. Spread your carbon footprint and use disposable paper plates, etc, or recycle plastic/melamine, and just wipe them off with a wet-wipe. Or, just "batch" it, and eat out of a can.

I don't cook while I'm on the road. Sandwiches, cold cuts, etc. keep me full. I have managed to warm up chili and soups by setting a can next to the bunk heater vent. Not the best idea in places like Corpus Christi, TX, in the summertime.

Personal business: No. 1: Bladder sizes vary. Some can make it, some need a relief. Many drivers keep an empty juice or Gatorade bottle handy. Remember this, though: "fresh" urine can be simply poured out, hopefully on grass/dirt. Leaving it in the bottle, it actually becomes classified as hazardous waste. No. 2: Well, let's just not (ahem) go there in the cab.

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

Rolling Thunder's Comment
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I usually cook in a crock pot and/or heat in a microwave when running truck load. No frying and no flames for me.

As for the restroom thing, Errol has it right.

Spanky FKA A.Meggs's Comment
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Cooking: Fry pan inside is not a good idea - no ventilation. Though the idea of a bacon fragrance all the time might sound good, try to keep the inside clean. I have heard of drivers that might cook on the cat walk. You will find mini-stoves running on propane at truck stops. (Walmart can get you a better price!). Flame, in my opinion, always packs better heat than electric. Spread your carbon footprint and use disposable paper plates, etc, or recycle plastic/melamine, and just wipe them off with a wet-wipe. Or, just "batch" it, and eat out of a can.

I don't cook while I'm on the road. Sandwiches, cold cuts, etc. keep me full. I have managed to warm up chili and soups by setting a can next to the bunk heater vent. Not the best idea in places like Corpus Christi, TX, in the summertime.

Personal business: No. 1: Bladder sizes vary. Some can make it, some need a relief. Many drivers keep an empty juice or Gatorade bottle handy. Remember this, though: "fresh" urine can be simply poured out, hopefully on grass/dirt. Leaving it in the bottle, it actually becomes classified as hazardous waste. No. 2: Well, let's just not (ahem) go there in the cab.

I remember going on trips with the old man to luisianna couple times a year, drove tanker hauling caustic acid mostly to paper plants as well as white/black liquor within the state and states around our border so he was home most nights. Day cab white gmc mostly, but that's what we usually had to do, straight to the bottle. Just can't really remember what happen for #2, paper logs then so I am sure we stopped. As far as cooking sounds about same as camping, improvise when needed and wash your tools the best u can.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

Spanky FKA A.Meggs's Comment
member avatar

I usually cook in a crock pot and/or heat in a microwave when running truck load. No frying and no flames for me.

As for the restroom thing, Errol has it right.

crazy as it sounds that actually never came to mind :) and who doesn't love a good crock pot meal, black eye peas with dumplings, ham chunks abd rice just may become my best bud. Just have to be careful with those beansgood-luck-2.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
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I use a crock pot also. I have had about three of the 12 volt models available at truck stops. But I personally think they are not designed to hold up for serious cooking. They are fine for warming up canned soup or such as that, but if you want to cook a chicken or some some smothered pork chops like I do then you need that thing to be cooking for five or six hours. I wore out the heating elements in the 12 volt ones. I finally just got a cheap 120 volt model from Wal-Mart and plug it into an inverter while cruising down the road - works great and the smell will drive you nuts on some days. I cook several versions of jambalaya and some meat and vegetable dishes, and also some great homemade soups with it. When cooking rice for the jambalaya dishes you need to use converted rice for it to cook properly. I also will do some cooking when I'm home and divide the meal up into one serving size portions and freeze them in some small tupperware containers. Then I will take some of them on the road with me (stored in my small refrigerator) and drop it in the crock-pot for an easy economical yet delicious meal that seems like home cooking.

Spanky FKA A.Meggs's Comment
member avatar

I use a crock pot also. I have had about three of the 12 volt models available at truck stops. But I personally think they are not designed to hold up for serious cooking. They are fine for warming up canned soup or such as that, but if you want to cook a chicken or some some smothered pork chops like I do then you need that thing to be cooking for five or six hours. I wore out the heating elements in the 12 volt ones. I finally just got a cheap 120 volt model from Wal-Mart and plug it into an inverter while cruising down the road - works great and the smell will drive you nuts on some days. I cook several versions of jambalaya and some meat and vegetable dishes, and also some great homemade soups with it. When cooking rice for the jambalaya dishes you need to use converted rice for it to cook properly. I also will do some cooking when I'm home and divide the meal up into one serving size portions and freeze them in some small tupperware containers. Then I will take some of them on the road with me (stored in my small refrigerator) and drop it in the crock-pot for an easy economical yet delicious meal that seems like home cooking.

That's what I was thinking for the most part but of course I could only take a few as space I'm sure would be limited. thinkIng its time to look up some one pot meals. I'm a suckered for roast and potatoes out the crock pot and if u freeze that with the juice it can be better than fresh out the pot. starting to think maybe I can manage without spending alot. And of course no stirring the pot while driving :)

Spanky FKA A.Meggs's Comment
member avatar

Erroll, i remember going on trips with the old man to luisianna couple times a year, drove tanker hauling caustic acid mostly to paper plants as well as white/black liquor within the state and states around our border so he was home most nights. Day cab white gmc mostly, but that's what we usually had to do, straight to the bottle. Just can't really remember what happen for #2, paper logs then so I am sure we stopped. As far as cooking sounds about same as camping, improvise when needed and wash your tools the best u can.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

It's not that hard to make a bathroom stop. There are usually lots of rest areas along the way that are easy to pull into and take care of your business and get right back on the road without killing a lot of time.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Forgot this: Manifold Destiny - the definitive book on cooking while driving. Use your engine to cook while you drive.

Bill Scheller & Chris Maynard. 2008, 3rd edition. (First published in 1989)

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