Fully Endorsed, But Inexperienced. Best Place To Start Job Search?

Topic 8684 | Page 1

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Sam T.'s Comment
member avatar

So I'm 25, have a Colorado class A CDL with TX (doubles/triples, tanker, Hazmat).

I got my cdl through Halliburton 5 years ago, where I worked for 14 months as an operator before becoming a field engineer (still had the cdl, but never used it). We did a 2 week drive school that included a a lot of city and mountain driving. I drove pretty much everything Halliburton had, albeit mostly in the country with no one around. Tractor trailer, flatbed, overweight loads, tanker, but mostly straight truck in the form of mobile cranes and box trucks (~50,000lbs). Hazmat of all kinds, including explosives and radioactive sources (little ones).

Then a lot of things happened and now I need a job (lets skip my story and just blame the damn Arabs and their cheap oil).

My goal is to take home over $3,500/month, work days Mon-Fri or similar (Sun-Fri, Mon-Sat, etc) 40-60 hours a week. Be home 5+ nights a week, and get as much experience as possible. I have those endorsements, might as well use them. My MVR is clean-one 1pt ticket for faulty headlamp last year is all. No history of drugs or alcohol anything.

Also, I'm not saying I'm a badass (because if I were why would I ask on here?) but Halliburton kind of taught me to believe I can do anything with a little practice if I try hard enough. If a scared kid could learn to drive a mobile crane with an unfamiliar shift pattern (and the knob broken off) after working 19 hours on 2 hours of sleep*, panicking trying to keep up with his crew, I had better be able to learn city driving, etc.

I appreciate any advice. I want to try for the best slots I can ($22/hr local LTL sounds great but I've only driven maybe 15,000 actual CDL miles) but don't want to waste anyone's time, least of all my own. So far, sounds like Vac trucks or Fuel Hauling** is the closest I'll get, wanting to stay relatively local and make $20+/hr. On the job, I really don't care what I do so long as it's not Halliburton crazy again.

Again, Thank you very much for replies :)

-Sam

*I realize this was very stupid. We were all 18-23 and thought it was fantastic to just frac like crazy being "badasses". Until people got hurt, anyway.

**Blasters also make good money, but seem to all be based 3 hours away from where I live.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

MVR:

Motor Vehicle Record

An MVR is a report of your driving history, as reported from your state Department of Motor Vehicles. Information on this report may include Drivers License information, point history, violations, convictions, and license status on your driving record.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Christopher J.'s Comment
member avatar

Transport Craigslist you should be able to find something maybe not $20 to start but $16 then move up after you prove yourself. Good Luck I am doing the same as I type, Mom was sick last 5 months, Now all is good and ready to join the workforce again. OTR is not for me, But just may have to for experience.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Sam T.'s Comment
member avatar

Trigger55te>

Transport Craigslist you should be able to find something maybe not $20 to start but $16 then move up after you prove yourself. Good Luck I am doing the same as I type, Mom was sick last 5 months, Now all is good and ready to join the workforce again. OTR is not for me, But just may have to for experience.

Yup, been seeing a lot along those lines so that's my fallback. I simply can't make it on $16/hr 40 hours a week though. With ample OT, possibly.

Anyone able to give an idea what I would make at .xx cpm? I see a lot of companies hiring with little recent experience for around .35 cpm. Trouble is, I can't tell for myself if their promises of 1,800 miles/week are good, or average per diems, or out of pocket expenses. Local hourly I can get a feelfor better. .35cpm seems (to me) to mean roughly $15/hr, no overtime. Which sure doesn't sound good. Anyone able to explain/guestimate that better? Like with a company like Melton or Stevens?

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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