Little Nervous Sounds Funny??

Topic 8783 | Page 1

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Aaron G's Comment
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I just landed with a company that runs paper logs and start work Wednesday they don't have any trucking GPS in there trucks but I guess I can buy one. But kinda been nervous about this whole paper log thing I would think electronic would be the way to go.

I understand cheating log books but what's the benefit of it? I want to run legit and follow any log book rules will I always be that way or will I end up cheating it? I'm assuming we all have been there any help would be appreciated thanks

Brett Aquila's Comment
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Most people wind up cheating with paper logs.

I ran paper logs my entire career. I cheated pretty much every day and so did every driver on the road pretty much. That's just how it was done. I didn't cheat so that I could turn more miles per week. I looked for about 3,000-3,200 each week. That's plenty and you can do that legally with electronic logs.

The reason I would cheat is to give myself more flexibility in my scheduling. I could run whenever I wanted to and park it whenever I wanted to without worrying about screwing up my available drive time. I didn't have to force myself to push through a 10 hour day without a nap. I didn't have to shut down for the night even though I was plenty rested after a long wait at the shipper. I could pull over and take a two hour nap instead of forcing my way through a city at rush hour. That kind of stuff.

That's how most people cheat when using paper logs. They're not looking to turn more miles each week or each month. They're just looking for more flexibility in their schedule so they can run when it makes sense to run and park it when it makes sense to park it.

I'm not condoning cheating, nor would I chastise anyone for it. That's an individual decision each driver must make for themselves. I would highly recommend doing it by the book, or very darn close to by the book, in the beginning of your career. It won't take long before you see why you would want to cheat and how you would do it. Whether or not you choose to is up to you. But the consequences can be dire if you get caught. If you're lucky you'll get a sizeable fine. If you get in a wreck and they determine you falsified your logs it's going to put you in the middle of a gigantic mess.

You're going to make decisions every day of your life out there that have the potential to affect your career, your life, and the lives of those around you. It's a gigantic responsibility. Safety must always come first. Protecting your license and your career always comes a close second. Before you consider cheating, make sure you understand that it's a very big deal to make a decision like that.

Electronic Logs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Aaron G's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Brett that helped out a bunch ya I'm pretty much wanting to keep it but the books for as long as I can. I'm pretty much protecting my CDL like its a pot of gold. 👍👍👍

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
The Persian Conversion's Comment
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The first week I was out I was totally committed to logging everything exactly as it happened with no tweaking whatsoever. But as my first 70 hour period drew to a close, I quickly realized how much of a disadvantage I had put myself in. Now, 3 weeks into my career, I find myself tweaking almost every day. Notice I don't say falsifying, because I think there is a very big distinction between the two.

Brett Aquila's Comment
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Notice I don't say falsifying, because I think there is a very big distinction between the two

Unfortunately law enforcement makes no such distinction. It's either accurate or it's false......there are no gray areas.

The Persian Conversion's Comment
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double-quotes-start.png

Notice I don't say falsifying, because I think there is a very big distinction between the two

double-quotes-end.png

Unfortunately law enforcement makes no such distinction. It's either accurate or it's false......there are no gray areas.

Well let's just hope no DOT officers patrol these forums :)

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Aaron G's Comment
member avatar

I am a DOT officer and we have our own forum and from time to time we skim through theses forms............ IM KiDDING LMAO 😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

My paper logs were always legit (after a few revisions of course, thank you loose leaf logs)

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Chris the stick slinger's Comment
member avatar

When I was in school we had a DOT officer come talk to the class. He told us one of the surest ways to get a level 3 inspection was to come into the scale house with loose leaf logs.

I have found no need to cheat my book. That being said just wait till you are 30 minutes from the yard and see if you want to do a 10 hour reset or fudge your book a little.

I'll not say I am perfect with my book but I refuse to run 2 different sets.

Bash away ye righteous drivers.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Chris the stick slinger's Comment
member avatar

Oops, that should have been a level one inspection.

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