Is 1800-2300 Miles A Week Ok?

Topic 9524 | Page 1

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Jay R. R2-Detour 's Comment
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I feel like I'm not doing that great, but I'm kind of at the mercy of my appointments. Mostly set times with not much wiggle room to be early. Usually only can be 1 hour early.

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
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You'll get loads like that where you don't have an open appointment. I guess the question is are you comfortable with the money you're making and realize that every load won't be that way. Budget wise, I personally am comfortable with a minimum of 2700-2800.

Dennis R. (Greatest Drive's Comment
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I usually run 600 miles daily,but slow shippers and receivers,can slow you down.Another reason I like driving team,longer runs and more flexibility,when planning stops.I usually get a 34 in sat-sun,then start the week with a fresh clock.5 days x600 miles-3000miles solo-6000 miles team...good week.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Jay R. R2-Detour 's Comment
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Think I'd like to start running a little harder. But these appointments don't help. My last load picked up the 16th and delivered 900 miles to Louisiana on the 19. Set appointment, no early delivery. Left the petro at 6 left the consignee and back at the petro by noon. Low freight was the reasoning for not having a pre plan load. I'll be sitting until tomorrow at least.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Brett Aquila's Comment
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To make good money you have to run hard when the runnin is good and use your downtime wisely when you get some. And you will get some.

Breakdowns, slow freight cycles, holidays, weather. It's hard to keep calm and relax sometimes when you're sitting around making nothing. So consider that your free time like ordinary humans get when the factory lets out and they go home. Difference is you're always home. Truckers work from home. Their home just moves around a lot.

Reading a great book, doing some extra long exercise sessions, tiny repairs you've been putting off, anything you might pursue with computers like a video blog or facetime chats with the family. Make the most of your time. Enjoy it. Don't just look at it as working or waiting to work. Look at it as working or having free time. Enjoy it and use it productively, even if that means 14 hours of sleep. If you need it then you've used your time wisely.

I would expect 2,500 miles bare minimum a week when you average it out for at least a month at a time. Don't freak out if you get a slow week, but definitely let dispatch know in a professional but direct way that you have to make up for that slow week right away if possible. 10,000 miles per month is solid, especially if you're enjoying your time off on the road or going home every so often.

Dennis R. (Greatest Drive's Comment
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I rarely get turned away at shippers for being early.Does this happen often?

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Jay R. R2-Detour 's Comment
member avatar

I rarely get turned away at shippers for being early.Does this happen often?

I haven't been turned away but I've arrived early and still had to sit and wait until my appointment time. I was 3 hours early to one and that made me leave and come back only 30 mins early though.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Fatsquatch 's Comment
member avatar

I rarely get turned away at shippers for being early.Does this happen often?

Depending on the place, yes, especially when it's a small place with nowhere to stage trucks that arrive before their appointments. Same with receivers. Quite a few places have standard procedures in place to only allow you to check in 30 minutes early at most. The Fred Meyer DCs in Clackamas, OR and Puyallup, WA are like that. Not that being checked in early guarantees that you'll be loaded or unloaded early. It's pretty much a crapshoot either way. I've been to places where I checked in 4 or 5 hours early and been done and on my way in less than an hour, and places where I've checked in 2 hours early and still waiting for them to start 4 hours past my appointment. It's just the nature of the beast.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Cody B.'s Comment
member avatar

I feel like I'm not doing that great, but I'm kind of at the mercy of my appointments. Mostly set times with not much wiggle room to be early. Usually only can be 1 hour early.

1800-2300 miles a week could be good or kinda lowsy depending on how many loads your getting in that week, for instance I load and and unload 5 times a week and am home on the weekend pulling a flatbed and I usually don't do more than 2200 miles in a week, so it all depends on the lots of different variables that are different from each company one being location and another being the type of frieght you haul and your dispatcher , if it's a reoccurring problem I'd just do what Brett suggested and talk with your fleet manager professional and let them know your issue with low miles and that you would prefer longer runs.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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