Just Recieved An Email From Prime

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Jason R.'s Comment
member avatar

I submitted a pre-hire about 2 weeks ago and just received an email saying to give them a called because their very interested. I don't start CDL school till Monday and wont be done till Nov 5th because I am going PT in the evenings. I do know when I talk to them I have to get my previous jobs and addy's line up in proper order. Hate to miss something or accidently leave something out just to get nailed on it later.

Do they look at app's differently if you all ready have your CDL-A and not looking to go through their school from scratch? I have also looked at Warner but weary about putting in a pre-hire because of all the neg reviews but since I live in Omaha where they are based it might be a good option. I have pre-hires at GO, Crete and schinder.

Any other advice?

My top 3 1. Prime 2. GO 3. Crete

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Pre-hires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Scott O.'s Comment
member avatar

It never hurts to have a lot of pre hires... get as many as you can and don't pick a company just cuz they have a terminal in your town... all the trucking companies will get you home no matter where you live.... I'm sure prime hires the same way no matter if you already have a CDl or not. I can't see them favor one way but change it up for another...

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Pre Hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Pre Hires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Frito's Comment
member avatar

Just got off the phone with a recruiter. He gave me the overview of the program for students arriving with a CDL in hand. I was well versed in what he had to say as I've done my homework. He told me if interested in dry van upon completion of training I'd be limited to a smaller eco-truck, no flexibility. From what I've further read, at 6' 7" tall, this would be a pretty uncomfortable setting for me. Upon further inquiry regarding team driving, which I'm interested in, he stated there is no matching program within the company for finding a team mate, it was all up to me. It would seem they are not as aggressive or interested in the concept as perhaps some other companies. He kept addressing me by name in a very unnatural fashion. I could tell it was something they told him to do in recruiter training to try and build a sense of trust. It was very fake and salesman like and I saw right though it. He then wanted to start a "file" on me with my ss#. While I have nothing to hide, when I hesitated (secondary to primarily what he'd just told me) I could tell he wanted to hang up on me. I just don't hand that info out to anyone. So far...which isn't very far...not so interested in Prime.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Steve Marshall's Comment
member avatar

Just because you already have your Class A CDL doesn't mean you won't have to go through training at Prime. You won't have to go through PSD which is about 3 weeks but you will still have to go through TNT training which you team drive with a trainer for at least 30,000 combined miles. That's 2-1/2 months ish. Depending on the loads you get and your paid 600 per week or. 12 per mile whichever is greater. Goes by quick though.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Phox's Comment
member avatar

Just because you already have your Class A CDL doesn't mean you won't have to go through training at Prime. You won't have to go through PSD which is about 3 weeks but you will still have to go through TNT training which you team drive with a trainer for at least 30,000 combined miles. That's 2-1/2 months ish. Depending on the loads you get and your paid 600 per week or. 12 per mile whichever is greater. Goes by quick though.

I'm curious what the point of prime's tnt training is... your first week or so is solo dispatch with trainer in passenger seat, then you are dispatched as a team, since you have to take 10 hours off duty after you have done 14 hours on duty (11 of which is driving), how exactly is your trainer able to legally train you if he's in the back trying to sleep?

The way I break it down, he does his 11 hours of driving, maybe he's got an hour or two left to sit in passenger seat and "train" you, but then he's legally required to go in the sleeper and take his 10 hour... what good is a sleeping trainer?

can anyone explain the point of primes tnt training... I could understand it if he was in the passenger seat the whole time or at least awake and on duty but other that i see it as prime trying to make more money instead of make sure their drivers get better training.

maybe i'm just missing something.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

Just because you already have your Class A CDL doesn't mean you won't have to go through training at Prime. You won't have to go through PSD which is about 3 weeks but you will still have to go through TNT training which you team drive with a trainer for at least 30,000 combined miles. That's 2-1/2 months ish. Depending on the loads you get and your paid 600 per week or. 12 per mile whichever is greater. Goes by quick though.

double-quotes-end.png

I'm curious what the point of prime's tnt training is... your first week or so is solo dispatch with trainer in passenger seat, then you are dispatched as a team, since you have to take 10 hours off duty after you have done 14 hours on duty (11 of which is driving), how exactly is your trainer able to legally train you if he's in the back trying to sleep?

The way I break it down, he does his 11 hours of driving, maybe he's got an hour or two left to sit in passenger seat and "train" you, but then he's legally required to go in the sleeper and take his 10 hour... what good is a sleeping trainer?

can anyone explain the point of primes tnt training... I could understand it if he was in the passenger seat the whole time or at least awake and on duty but other that i see it as prime trying to make more money instead of make sure their drivers get better training.

maybe i'm just missing something.

I think you're directing this at the wrong company. Let's take a look at CR England for example or Swift. You go out with a trainer for 2-3 weeks and it's team driving from Day 1. Now those students hardly ever get instruction time with their trainer and are sort of forced to learn through mistakes. So instead of prolonging the training and making sure the student gets proper training, they make it team driving from the start.

So let's go back to evaluating Primes training program. The instructor has to spend 3 weeks watching you drive and coaching you. Eventually there comes a time where you should know the basics but you just need to sharpen your skills through daily practice. You don't need a trainer sitting in the passenger seat for that, you just need to drive and learn everyday by practicing what you already know.

In my situation, my student has about 2 more weeks in the TNT phase. At this point it's nothing but a grind. I've literally taught him all i know and I think he's ready, but Primes training program is so long that he's not qualified yet based on their standards.

Yes, having a student team drive with a trainer is cheap labor. At my first company I got paid 350 per week gross during training. My student makes 700 gross per week. But team driving at some point will almost always be a requirement at one time or another.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

I actually asked my student your question and here's what he said.

The point of tnt training is to practice before going solo but with a safety net. Meaning he's trying to do the work himself, but if he ever gets stuck or needs help he can wake up his trainer to get him out of the bind (his safety net).

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

DaveDiesel's Comment
member avatar
The point of tnt training is to practice before going solo but with a safety net. Meaning he's trying to do the work himself, but if he ever gets stuck or needs help he can wake up his trainer to get him out of the bind (his safety net).

Sounds like good training.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Daniel B. thinks

Let's take a look at CR England for example or Swift. You go out with a trainer for 2-3 weeks and it's team driving from Day 1. Now those students hardly ever get instruction time with their trainer and are sort of forced to learn through mistakes.

Don't know 'bout England, but I did my road training with Swift.

My first 50 drive hours, my mentor sat next to me the whole time. We did the 10 hour & 30 minute breaks together. At shippers/receivers he would get out, stand at the back and watch/guide my back-ups. While I drove, sometimes he would go over Qualcomm codes & Swift policy stuff.

After the first 50 hours, we went team for another 400 hours. Yes, I drove, he slept and vice versa. But in the meantime, non-driver could sit up front & we would talk about life, the universe and everything.

My turn at a shipper or receiver, Carlos would have his alarm set, and he'd get up and still watch as I did my stuff. Yes, you can get quality retaining in a team environment.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Daniel B. thinks

double-quotes-start.png

Let's take a look at CR England for example or Swift. You go out with a trainer for 2-3 weeks and it's team driving from Day 1. Now those students hardly ever get instruction time with their trainer and are sort of forced to learn through mistakes.

double-quotes-end.png

Don't know 'bout England, but I did my road training with Swift.

My first 50 drive hours, my mentor sat next to me the whole time. We did the 10 hour & 30 minute breaks together. At shippers/receivers he would get out, stand at the back and watch/guide my back-ups. While I drove, sometimes he would go over Qualcomm codes & Swift policy stuff.

After the first 50 hours, we went team for another 400 hours. Yes, I drove, he slept and vice versa. But in the meantime, non-driver could sit up front & we would talk about life, the universe and everything.

My turn at a shipper or receiver, Carlos would have his alarm set, and he'd get up and still watch as I did my stuff. Yes, you can get quality retaining in a team environment.

Looks like improvements have been made. Back in my day that's not how it went. (Am I old enough to say that yet?)

rofl-1.gif

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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