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CDL Practice Test: Hazardous Materials

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CDL Practice Test: Hazardous Materials

Hazardous Materials Questions

Click On The Picture To Begin

Good Luck!

Never smoke around:
  • Class 1 explosives
  • Class 5 oxidizers
  • Do not smoke around any of these
  • Division 2.1 flammable gas
This is a question from page 69 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 96 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

No smoking: When loading or unloading hazardous materials, keep fire away. Do not let people smoke nearby.

Never smoke around:

  • Class 1 explosives
  • Division 2.1 flammable Gas
  • Class 3 flammable liquids
  • Class 4 flammable solids
  • Class 5 oxidizers
Next
The person watching the loading or unloading of a tank must be within how many feet of the tank?
  • Within 50 feet
  • No closer than 100 feet
  • Within 25 feet
  • Within 75 feet
This is a question from page 72 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 100 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

The person in charge of loading and unloading a cargo tank must be sure a qualified person is always watching. The person watching the loading or unloading must:

  • Be alert.
  • Have a clear view of the cargo tank and delivery hose.
  • Be within 25 feet of the tank.
  • Know of the hazards of the materials involved.
  • Know the procedures to follow in an emergency.
  • Be authorized to move the cargo tank and able to do so.
Prev
Next
ID names on cargo tanks can be displayed on:
  • Placards
  • White square-on-point configuration
  • Orange panels
  • ID names can be placed on any of these
This is a question from page 72 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 100 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

You must display the ID number of the hazardous materials on portable tanks and cargo tanks and other bulk packagings (such as dump trucks). ID numbers are in column 4 of the Hazardous Materials Table. When required, identification number markings must be displayed on orange panels or placards as specified in this section, or on white square-on-point configuration. Specification cargo tanks must show re-test date markings.

Prev
Next
Which of the following do you have to know in order to place the correct placards on your vehicle?
  • Material's hazard class
  • Amount of all hazardous materials of all classes on your vehicle
  • Drivers need to know all of these things in order to place the correct placards on the vehicle
  • Amount being shipped
This is a question from page 65 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 90 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

You can decide which placards to use if you know these three things:

  • Material's hazard class.
  • Amount being shipped.
  • Amount of all hazardous materials of all classes on your vehicle.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

While a shipper will supply you with placards to place on your truck, you must verify they are giving you the proper placards. If you place the incorrect placards on the truck, you will be the one responsible for any citations received.

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Next
You may not transport division 1.1 or 1.2 explosives if:
  • Any fuller trailer in the combination has a wheel base of less than 184 inches
  • The other vehicle in the combination contains any substances, explosive, n.o.s., Division 1.1A (explosive) material (initiating explosive)
  • More than two cargo carrying vehicles are in the combination
  • All of these answers are correct
This is a question from page 70 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 97 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Division 1.1 or 1.2 (explosive) materials may not be loaded into or carried on any vehicle or a combination of vehicles if:

-More than two cargo carrying vehicles are in the combination,
-Any fuller trailer in the combination has a wheel base of less than 184 inches,
-Any vehicle in the combination is a cargo tank required to be marked or placarded under ยง177.823, or
-The other vehicle in the combination contains any:

- substances, explosive, n.o.s., Division 1.1A (explosive) material (initiating explosive),
-Packages of Class 7 (radioactive) materials bearing "Yellow III" labels,
- Division 2.3, Hazard Zone A or Hazard Zone B materials or Division 6.1, PG I, - - Hazard Zone A materials, or
- Hazardous materials in a portable tank or a DOT specification 106 A or 110A tank.

Prev
Next
At what distance are you prohibited from smoking near a placarded cargo tank used for class 3 flammable liquids?
  • Within 75 feet
  • Within 25 feet
  • Within 10 feet
  • Within 50 feet
This is a question from page 74 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 101 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Do not smoke within 25 feet of a placarded cargo tank used for Class 3 (flammable liquids) or Division 2.1 (gases). Also, do not smoke or carry a lighted cigarette, cigar or pipe within 25 feet of any vehicle that contains:

  • Class 1 explosives
  • Class 2.1 flammable gas
  • Class 3 flammable liquids
  • Class 4.1 flammable solids
  • Class 4.2 spontaneously combustible
  • Class 5 oxidizers

TruckingTruth's Advice:

The cab of the truck, both inside and out, is considered part of the placarded vehicle, so no smoking is allowed by the driver of the vehicle while in the cab.

Prev
Next
The term "Hazardous Materials" is often shortened to:
  • HazardM
  • HAZ
  • HAZMAT
  • Hmaterial
This is a question from page 62 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 86 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Hazardous materials are products that pose a risk to health, safety and property during transportation. The term often is shortened to HAZMAT, which you may see on road signs, or HM in government regulations.

Prev
Next
When transporting hazardous materials, the carrier is responsible for which of the following?
  • Must package, mark and label the materials, prepare shipping papers, provide emergency response information and supply placards
  • Install proper placards on the vehicle
  • Reports accidents and incidents involving hazardous materials to the proper government agency
  • The carrier is not responsible for any of these
This is a question from page 63 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 87 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

The carrier:

  • Takes the shipment from the shipper to its destination.
  • Prior to transportation, checks that the shipper correctly described, marked, labeled and otherwise prepared the shipment for transportation.
  • Refuses improper shipments.
  • Reports accidents and incidents involving hazardous materials to the proper government agency

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Be sure to understand the different responsibilities for:

  • The shipper
  • The carrier
  • The driver
Prev
Finish
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[3,3,4,3,4,2,3,3]
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