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CDL Practice Test: Hazardous Materials

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CDL Practice Test: Hazardous Materials

Hazardous Materials Questions

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Good Luck!

To decide which placards to use, you need to know all of the following information, except:
  • The hazard class of materials
  • The type of container the material is in
  • The total weight of all classes of hazardous materials in your vehicle.
  • The amount of hazardous materials shipped.
This is a question from page 68 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 94 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

To decide which placards to use, you need to know:

  • The hazard class of materials.
  • The amount of hazardous materials shipped.
  • The total weight of all classes of hazardous materials in your vehicle.
Next
When transporting hazardous materials, the driver is responsible for:
  • Making sure the shipper has identified, marked and labeled the hazardous materials properly
  • Properly placarding the vehicle
  • The driver is responsible for all of these
  • Refusing leaking packages and shipments
This is a question from page 63 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 87 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

The driver:

  • Makes sure the shipper has identified, marked and labeled the hazardous materials properly.
  • Refuses leaking packages and shipments.
  • Placards his vehicle when loading, if required.
  • Safely transports the shipment without delay.
  • Follows all special rules about transporting hazardous materials.
  • Keeps hazardous materials shipping papers and emergency response information in the proper place

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Be sure to understand the different responsibilities for:

  • The shipper
  • The carrier
  • The driver
Prev
Next
When sending a hazardous material, the shipper is NOT responsible for:
  • preparing shipping papers
  • Reporting en-route accidents and incidents involving hazardous materials to the proper government agency
  • Supplying placards
  • Marking and labeling the materials
This is a question from page 63 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 87 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

The shipper:

  • Sends products from one place to another by truck, rail, vessel or airplane.
  • Uses the hazardous materials regulations to decide the product's:
    • Proper shipping name
    • Hazard class
    • Identification number
    • Correct packaging
    • Correct label and markings
    • Correct placards
  • Must package, mark and label the materials, prepare shipping papers, provide emergency response information and supply placards.
  • Must certify on the shipping paper that the shipment has been prepared according to the rules (unless you are pulling cargo tanks supplied by you or your employer)

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Be sure to understand the different responsibilities for:

  • The shipper
  • The carrier
  • The driver
Prev
Next
If a shipping paper describes both hazardous and non-hazardous products, the hazardous materials will be:
  • Identified by an "X" placed before the shipping name in a column captioned "HM"
  • All of these answers are correct
  • Highlighted in a contrasting color
  • Described first
This is a question from page 66 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 92 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

If a shipping paper describes both hazardous and non-hazardous products, the hazardous materials will either be:

  • Described first
  • Highlighted in a contrasting color
  • Identified by an "X" placed before the shipping name in a column captioned "HM." The letters "RQ" may be used instead of "X" if a reportable quantity is present in one package.
Prev
Next
Where should emergency response information be kept?
  • In the same location as the shipping paper
  • In the front glove box
  • In a locked fireproof safety box
  • In the trailer with the product
This is a question from page 74 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 102 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Emergency response information must be kept in the same location as the shipping paper.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Law enforcement officers will randomly check placarded vehicles to be sure they are carrying emergency response information and that it is kept with the shipping paper, so be diligent about this.

Prev
Next
The term "Hazardous Materials" is often shortened to:
  • HazardM
  • Hmaterial
  • HAZMAT
  • HAZ
This is a question from page 62 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 86 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Hazardous materials are products that pose a risk to health, safety and property during transportation. The term often is shortened to HAZMAT, which you may see on road signs, or HM in government regulations.

Prev
Next
How many gallons will deem a portable tank, cargo tank, or tank car "bulk" freight?
  • 100 gallons
  • 119 gallons
  • 172 gallons
  • 148 gallons
This is a question from page 67 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 93 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Cargo tanks and other bulk containers require additional markings on the transport vehicle. "Bulk" is defined as a packaging with a maximum capacity greater than 119 gallons for liquid, including but not limited to such packagings as portable tanks, cargo tanks and tank cars. If required identification number markings on bulk containers are not visible while being transported (such as when loaded inside a closed semitrailer), the transport vehicle itself must also display on each side and each end the required identification number markings.

Prev
Next
While transporting a placarded load, you must stop how many feet before a railroad crossing?
  • 25 to 75 feet
  • 50 to 100 feet
  • 15 to 50 feet
  • 10 to 20 feet
This is a question from page 74 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 102 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Stop before a railroad crossing if your vehicle:

  • Is placarded; or
  • Carries any amount of chlorine; or
  • Has cargo tanks, whether loaded or empty, used for hazardous materials. You must stop 15 to 50 feet before the nearest rail. Proceed only when you are sure no train is coming. Do not shift gears while crossing the tracks.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

If there is a sign on the railroad crossing that says "exempt" or "abandoned" you do not need to stop but should still slow down and cross with caution.

Prev
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