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CDL Practice Test: Hazardous Materials

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CDL Practice Test: Hazardous Materials

Hazardous Materials Questions

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Good Luck!

Before driving vehicles carrying hazardous materials that require placards, you must:
  • Receive a written Permission Of Endorsement Exemption (POEE) from the shipper
  • Hold a CDL with a Hazardous Materials Endorsement
  • Acquire a temporary HAZMAT permit
  • Any of these are ways to carry hazardous materials that require placards
This is a question from page 62 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 86 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

You must have a CDL with a Hazardous Materials Endorsement before driving vehicles carrying hazardous materials that require placards. You must pass a security background check and a written exam about the regulations and requirements to get this endorsement

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Under no circumstance should you transport a Hazardous Materials placarded vehicle unless you hold a valid CDL with a HAZMAT endorsement.

Next
Who do you need to notify when a class 2 (compressed gas) placarded vehicle is involved in an accident?
  • The receiver
  • The carrier
  • Poison control
  • The shipper
This is a question from page 76 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 103 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

If compressed gas is leaking from your vehicle, warn others of the danger. Only permit those involved in removing the hazard or wreckage to get close. You must notify the shipper if compressed gas is involved in any accident.

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Next
Placards must appear:
  • On the sides of the vehicle
  • On the rear of the vehicle only
  • On both sides and ends of the vehicle
  • On the front and back of the vehicle
This is a question from page 68 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 94 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Placards must appear on both sides and ends of the vehicle. Each placard must be:

  • Easily seen from the direction it faces.
  • Placed so the words or numbers are level and read from left to right.
  • At least 3 inches away from any other markings.
  • Kept clear of attachments or devices such as ladders, doors and tarpaulins.
  • Kept clean and undamaged so that the color, format and message are easily seen.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Make sure you grab an extra placard or two before leaving a shipper in case one of your placards blows away.

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Next
When behind the wheel, where must hazardous material shipping papers be kept?
  • Under the passenger seat
  • In the front glove box
  • In a fire proof box such as a small safe
  • Within reach of the driver
This is a question from page 74 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 102 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Do not accept a hazardous materials shipment without a properly prepared shipping paper. A shipping paper for hazardous material must always be easily recognized. Other people must be able to find it quickly after an accident.

  • Clearly distinguish hazardous material shipping papers from others by tabbing them or keeping them on top of the stack of papers.
  • When you are behind the wheel, keep shipping papers within your reach (with your seat belt on) or in a pouch on the driver's door. They must be easily seen by someone entering the cab.
  • When not behind the wheel, leave shipping papers in the driver's door pouch or on the driver's seat.
  • Emergency response information must be kept in the same location as the shipping paper.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

It's good practice to keep hazardous materials shipping papers in the drivers side door pocket. This area is acceptable not only while driving, but also while parked.

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Next
A shipper's emergency response information provided to a carrier must include all of the following, except:
  • Information on the shipping name of the hazardous materials, risks to health, fire, and explosion
  • How to fight a fire started by the type of material being shipped
  • How to safely handle incidents involving the material being shipped
  • Initial methods of handling spills, fires and leaks of the materials.
This is a question from page 66 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 93 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Shippers also must provide emergency response information to the motor carrier for each hazardous material being shipped. The emergency response information must be able to be used away from the motor vehicle and must provide information on how to safely handle incidents involving the material. It must include information on the shipping name of the hazardous materials, risks to health, fire, explosion, and initial methods of handling spills, fires and leaks of the materials.

Such information can be on the shipping paper or some other document that includes the basic description and technical name of the hazardous material. Or, it may be in a guidance book such as the Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG). Motor carriers may assist shippers by keeping an ERG on each vehicle carrying hazardous materials. The driver must provide the emergency response information to any federal, state or local authority responding to a hazardous materials incident or investigating one.

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Next
When sending a hazardous material, the shipper is NOT responsible for:
  • Marking and labeling the materials
  • Supplying placards
  • preparing shipping papers
  • Reporting en-route accidents and incidents involving hazardous materials to the proper government agency
This is a question from page 63 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 87 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

The shipper:

  • Sends products from one place to another by truck, rail, vessel or airplane.
  • Uses the hazardous materials regulations to decide the product's:
    • Proper shipping name
    • Hazard class
    • Identification number
    • Correct packaging
    • Correct label and markings
    • Correct placards
  • Must package, mark and label the materials, prepare shipping papers, provide emergency response information and supply placards.
  • Must certify on the shipping paper that the shipment has been prepared according to the rules (unless you are pulling cargo tanks supplied by you or your employer)

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Be sure to understand the different responsibilities for:

  • The shipper
  • The carrier
  • The driver
Prev
Next
Which of these is a shipper's responsibility for HAZMAT placarded loads?
  • All of these are shipper responsibilities
  • Package, mark and label the materials
  • Report en-route accidents to proper government agencies
  • Placard the vehicle
This is a question from page 63 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 87 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

The shipper:

  • Sends products from one place to another by truck, rail, vessel or airplane.
  • Uses the hazardous materials regulations to decide the product's:
    • Proper shipping name
    • Hazard class
    • Identification number
    • Correct packaging
    • Correct label and markings
    • Correct placards
  • Must package, mark and label the materials, prepare shipping papers, provide emergency response information and supply placards.
  • Must certify on the shipping paper that the shipment has been prepared according to the rules (unless you are pulling cargo tanks supplied by you or your employer)

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Be sure to understand the different responsibilities for:

  • The shipper
  • The carrier
  • The driver
Prev
Next
Shippers are responsible for putting which of the following information on shipping papers when shipping a HAZMAT load:
  • Hazard class
  • Proper shipping name
  • Identification number
  • All of these must be displayed on the shipping papers
This is a question from page 63 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 87 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

The shipper:

  • Sends products from one place to another by truck, rail, vessel or airplane.
  • Uses the hazardous materials regulations to decide the product's:
  • Proper shipping name
  • Hazard class
  • Identification number
  • Correct packaging
  • Correct label and markings
  • Correct placards
  • Must package, mark and label the materials, prepare shipping papers, provide emergency response information and supply placards.
  • Certify on the shipping paper that the shipment has been prepared according to the rules (unless you are pulling cargo tanks supplied by you or your employer).

TruckingTruth's Advice:

While it is the shippers responsibility to provide you with the correct paperwork (with the correct and required info) as well as the placards for your vehicle, it is up to you to make sure everything is correct.

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