TruckingTruth logo

CDL Practice Test: Logbook Rules

These CDL practice questions are from our High Road Training Program, a CDL test preparation course designed to help you learn the CDL manual.

Our High Road Training Program has the entire CDL manual built right in along with multiple choice questions, a scoring system, and a review system to help reinforce the materials. It's highly effective, super easy to use, and free! Let me tall ya....using The High Road is a thousand times easier than trying to read the entire CDL manual cover to cover.

Click Here To Learn More

CDL Practice Test: Logbook Rules

Logbook Rules Questions

Click On The Picture To Begin

Good Luck!

Your log must include all of the following except:
  • Your signature
  • Your home address
  • Truck or tractor and trailer number
  • Total driving miles
This is a question from page 97 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

The regulations do not say what the log form must look like. However, it must include a 24-hour graph grid, which is shown in the regulations, and the following information on each page:

  • Total driving miles: You must write down the total number of miles you drove during the 24-hour period.
  • Main office address: You must write down your carrier’s main office address.
  • Truck or tractor and trailer number: You must write down either the vehicle number(s) assigned by your company, or the license number and licensing state for each truck (and trailer, if any) you drove during the 24-hour period.
  • Your signature: You must certify that all of your entries are true and correct by signing your log with your legal name or name of record.
Next

At what time does a violation occur on this log?

  • 8:00 p.m.
  • 9:00 p.m.
  • 10:00 p.m.
  • 7:00 p.m.
This is a question from page 104 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Violations: There is a 14 hour rule violation from 10:00 p.m. - 11:00 p.m.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 11 hours of driving time available starting at midnight. The driver completed 9 hours of driving by 11:00 p.m. and went off duty, so there are no violations of the 11 hour rule.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: Since the driver was never on duty longer than 8 consecutive hours, the 30 minute break provision was never a factor.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 14 hours available at midnight. The driver used 10 of those hours by 10:00 a.m. before entering the sleeper berth for 8 consecutive hours. The 8 consecutive hour sleeper berth period is excluded from the 14 hour limit, but the 1 hour off duty period connected to that sleeper berth period is not. So the 14 hour limit was reached at 10:00 p.m., 4 hours after the end of the sleeper berth period, and the driver violated the rule by continuing to drive for another hour. To remain in compliance, the driver should have either stopped driving at 10:00 p.m., or remained in the sleeper berth from 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

Prev
Next

On which of the below logs did a violation occur?

Day 1

Day 2

  • Both days contain at least one violation
  • No violations occurred on either day
  • Day 1 contains at least one violation
  • Day 2 contains at least one violation
This is a question from page 98 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Day 1

Day 2

Violations: There are no violations in this example.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 11 available hours of driving and began driving at 11:00 a.m. on Day 1. The driver drove between the hours of 11:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. (5 hours), went off duty for 1 hour, then drove between 5:00 p.m. and 11:00 p.m. (6 hours). No more driving was completed on Day 1 so the driver did not exceed the 11 hour driving limit (5 + 6). Starting at Midnight going into Day 2, the driver may not drive a CMV until he/she goes off duty for a minimum of 10 consecutive hours, which is indicated on the log. On Day 2, the driver only operated a CMV for 3 hours and so no violation occurred.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: The 1 hour off duty break between 4:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. on Day 1 fulfilled the 30 minute break requirement. While only 30 minutes off duty is required, taking a break longer than 30 minutes (as in this case) is perfectly legal. The driver may drive a CMV only if 8 hours or less have passed since the end of the driver’s last off duty period of at least 30 minutes. On Day 2, the driver was only on duty for a 3 hour stretch which wouldn't require the 30 minute break. Both Day 1 and Day 2 of this example are free from any 30 minute break violations.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: After taking 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver changed to on duty status at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. This is the calculation point for the 14 hour limit so the driver has until Midnight to complete all driving tasks. At midnight, the driver switched to the sleeper berth for 10 consecutive hours. Since the driver performed all driving tasks within 14 hours on Day 1, no violation occurred. No violation occurred on Day 2, either, since the driver was only on duty (driving) for a total of 3 hours.

Prev
Next

Which log below contains at least one violation?

Day 1

Day 2

  • Day 2
  • There are no violations in this example
  • Both day 1 and day 2
  • Day 1
This is a question from page 99 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Day 1

Day 2

Violations: There is a 30 minute break violation in this example from 6:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m and 11:00 p.m. to Midnight on Day 1.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: On Day 1, the driver drove from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. (5 hours) then again from 6:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. (4 hours) and finally from 11:00 p.m. to Midnight (1 hour). Therefore, the driver drove for a total of 10 hours on Day 1 (5 + 4 + 1) and never violated the 11 hour limit. On Day 2, the driver only drove between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. for a total of 4 hours, thus, no violation of the 11 hour limit occurred.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: On Day 1, the calculation point for the 30 minute break provision is 10:00 a.m. In order to continue driving beyond 6:00 p.m. (8 hours after the initial starting calculation point) a 30 minute break off duty must be taken. Since the driver never took a break off duty, a 30 minute break violation occurred between the hours of 6:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. The driver then went on duty between the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 11:00 p.m., before violating the 30 minute break provision again by driving a CMV between 11:00 p.m. and Midnight. In order to remain legal, the driver should have taken his/her 30 minute break by 6:00 p.m. On Day 2, the driver was only on duty for a total of 7 consecutive hours which would not require a 30 minute break.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: After taking 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 14 hours available beginning at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. The driver switched into the sleeper berth at Midnight, exactly 14 hours later. Since the driver remained in the sleeper for 10 consecutive hours, the 14 hour limit reset and the new starting calculation point was then 10:00 a.m. on Day 2. The driver only remained on duty from the hours of 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. for a total of 7 hours of on duty time on Day 2. The driver remined legal on both days and no violation occurred.

Prev
Next

What violation has occurred at 10:00 a.m. on Day 2?

Day 1

Day 2

  • There is no violation at 10:00 a.m.
  • There is an 11 hour rule violation
  • There is a 14 hour rule violation
  • There is a 30 minute break violation
This is a question from page 102 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Day 1

Day 2

Violations: There is an 11 hour rule violation from 12:30 p.m. - 1:00 p.m., and a 14 hour rule violation from noon - 1:00 p.m., both on Day 2.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 11 hours of driving time available at 10:00 a.m. After 7 1/2 hours of driving (3 + 2 1/2 + 2), the driver entered the sleeper berth for 2 consecutive hours, making him or her eligible for the split sleeper berth provision. The driver accumulated at least 10 hours of rest using a combination of at least 8 (but less than 10) consecutive hours in a sleeper berth and another break of at least 2 (but less than 10) consecutive hours. This moves the calculation point to the end of the first of the two qualifying periods of rest, or 10:00 p.m. on Day 1. The next 11 hour calculation starts there, and the driver reached the 11 hour driving limit at 12:30 p.m. on Day 2 but still continued to drive for another 1/2 hour.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: On both Day 1 and Day 2, the driver never spent more than 8 consecutive hours on duty or driving and therefore, no violation occurred on either day.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: Calculation of the 14 hour limit begins at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. At midnight on Day 1, the driver still had 9 hours remaining because any sleeper berth period of at least 8 but less than 10 consecutive hours is excluded from the 14 hour calculation. By 4:00 a.m. on Day 2, the driver had 5 hours remaining (14 - 3 - 2 1/2 - 1 1/2 - 2 = 5). The driver then took a break of at least 2 consecutive hours, making him or her eligible for the split sleeper berth provision. This moves the calculation point to the end of the first of the two qualifying periods of rest, or 10:00 p.m. on Day 1. The next 14 hour calculation starts there, and the driver reached the end of the 14 hour duty period at noon on Day 2 and drove for 1 hour over the 14 hour limit.

Prev
Next
How many days are you required to keep your completed logs?
  • 12 days
  • 10 days
  • 14 days
  • 8 days
This is a question from page 96 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Authorized government inspectors may check your logs at any time. You will be required to keep a log for each of the previous 8 days. The current days log must be current to your last change of duty status. Inspectors check your logs to see if you have violated the hours of service regulations. Violations of the HOS regulations can result in being fined and/or placed out of service.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

You must have a total of 8 logs at all times:

  • Your current day's log.
  • Logs for each of the previous 7 days.

Law enforcement officers and DOT inspectors will usually issue a citation if you do not have all of those logs to show them.

Prev
Next

What violations occurred on Day 2 of this example?

Day 1

Day 2


  • There is an 11 hour rule violation and a 30 minute break violation
  • There is a 14 and 11 hour rule violation as well as a 30 minute break violation
  • There is a 14 and 11 hour rule violation
  • There is a 14 hour rule violation and a 30 minute break violation
This is a question from page 102 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Day 1

Day 2

Violations: There are a total of 3 violations on Day 2. First, there is a 14 hour rule violation from 1:00 a.m. - 2:00 a.m. Second, there is a 30 minute break violation from 8:00 p.m - midnight. And third, there is also an 11 hour rule violation from 11:00 p.m. - midnight.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty using a combination of off duty and sleeper berth time, the driver was eligible to drive for up to 11 hours starting at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. By 2:00 a.m. on Day 2, the driver had driven 9 hours. By obtaining 10 consecutive hours off duty on Day 2, the 11 hour calculation point moved to noon on Day 2, at which point the driver had 11 hours of driving time available again. The driver violated the 11 hour rule by driving beyond the 11 hour limit between 11:00 p.m. and Midnight.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: On Day 1, the driver was never required to take a 30 minute break because the longest stretch of on duty time during the entire day was only 6 consecutive hours. On day 2, the driver never took a minimum of 30 consecutive minutes off duty, even after remaining in the driver's seat for more than 8-hours. At 8:00 p.m. the driver was in violation of the 30 minute break provision and remained in violation for the remainder of the day.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 14 hours available at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. The driver reached the 14 hour limit at midnight (the 5-hour sleeper-berth period is included in the 14 hour calculation because it was less than 8 hours). Though the driver was not eligible to drive a CMV after midnight, he or she was able to continue working on duty without violation, as long as no driving took place (which was done for 1 hour). The driver violated the 14 hour rule by driving a CMV at 1:00 a.m. Then, after 10 consecutive hours off duty, the 14 hour calculation point moved to noon on Day 2, at which point the driver had 14 hours available to work again.

Prev
Next

What violations occurred in this example?

Day 1

Day 2

  • There is a 30 minute break violation
  • There is a 14 hour rule violation
  • There is a 14 hour rule violation as well as a 30 minute break violation
  • There are no violations
This is a question from page 103 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Day 1

Day 2

Violations: There is a 14 hour rule violation from 5:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m. on Day 2.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver was eligible to drive for up to 11 hours at 5:00 a.m. on Day 1. Before obtaining another 10 consecutive hour break (beginning at 9:00 a.m. on Day 2), he or she drove for only 7 hours, well within the limit.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: All requirements for the 30 minute break provision were met. The driver never drove after being on duty for longer than 8 consecutive hours without at least 30 consecutive minutes spent off duty.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 14 hours available at 5:00 a.m. on Day 1.

The 14 hour calculation includes:
  • All off duty time of less than 10 consecutive hours;
  • All sleeper-berth time of less than 8 hours; and
  • All on duty and driving time.

Therefore, the driver reached the 14 hour limit at 7:00 p.m. on Day 1, and the violation began when the driver drove a CMV at 5:00 a.m. on Day 2.

NOTE: Although this driver had 15½ hours off duty between 9:00 a.m. on Day 1 and 1:00 a.m. on Day 2, that off duty time was interrupted by a period of 30 minutes on duty (3:00 p.m. on Day 1). Therefore, both the 6-hour sleeper-berth period and the 9½-hour off duty period are included in the 14 hour calculation (the calculation point does not change from 5:00 a.m. on Day 1). In addition, note that the driver can legally work after reaching the 14 hour limit, but cannot drive a commercial motor vehicle.

To remain in compliance, the driver should not have gone on duty from 3:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. on Day 1, or should have remained off duty from 1:00 a.m. - 1:30 a.m. on Day 2, in order to get 10 consecutive hours of off duty time.

Prev
Finish
Please select an option
[2,3,2,4,1,4,2,2]
8

Ready For A Quiz? Pick A Category:

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only are they fantastic, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! So sign up now and get instant access to our member's section, including:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Private messaging for more personal questions
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

About Us

Picture Of Brett Aquila
TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare you for a great start to your trucking career.