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CDL Practice Test: Logbook Rules

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CDL Practice Test: Logbook Rules

Logbook Rules Questions

Click On The Picture To Begin

Good Luck!

How many on duty hours are remaining after the following has been logged (use a scratch sheet of paper if you need to):

- On duty/not driving: 3 hours

- Driving: 4 hours

- Sleeper berth: 8 hours

- Driving: 7 hours

- Off duty: 2 hours

  • Both the 11 and 14 hour limits have reset so all hours are now available
  • 14 hour clock: 7 hours
    11 hour clock: 6 hours
  • There is no time remaining on the drivers 11 or 14 hour clocks
  • 14 hour clock: 5 hours
    11 hour clock: 4 hours
This is a question from page 95 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Example of the split sleeper berth rule:

After taking 10 consecutive hours off duty, You start to work at 7:00 a.m. At 10:00 a.m., you begin driving and at 2:00 p.m. you spend 8 hours in your sleeper berth before resuming driving again at 10:00 p.m. At 10:00 p.m. Those 8 hours in the sleeper berth do not count as part of the 14 hour limit.

This means that you only used 7 of your 14 hours so far, and your 14 hour limit gets extended from 9:00 p.m. that evening to 5:00 a.m. the next morning. Your driving limit is still 11 hours and so far you have only driven 4 hours. That means you have 7 hours of driving time still available, allowing you to drive from 10:00 p.m. until 5:00 a.m.

At 5:00 a.m. you take your second rest period, going off duty for 2 hours. That brings you to 7:00 a.m.

Since you met the regulation of getting the equivalent of 10 hours off duty in two periods, you now have a new calculation point for figuring your 11 and 14 hours. Your new calculation point is at the end of the first rest period, which was at 10:00 p.m. Your new 14 hour period begins at 10:00 p.m. and ends 14 hours later, at noon the following day. During that new 14 hour period you are allowed 11 hours of driving.

From 10:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. you used-up 9 of the 14 duty-period hours and 7 of the 11 hours of driving time. Therefore you now have 5 hours of duty time available during which you are allowed to drive 4 hours.

Because your 14 hour duty period ends at 12:00 noon that day, before you can drive a CMV again after 12:00 noon, you must have another rest period in the sleeper berth of at least 8 consecutive hours (if you are using the sleeper-berth exception). After that you must again recalculate how many hours you will have available. Your new calculation point will be the end of the 2-hour off duty period you took earlier (7:00 a.m.).

TruckingTruth's Advice:

This example can be pretty confusing. Go back to page 95 for the full write up and explanation if you're still confused. It's very important to have a good understanding of the split sleeper berth provision.

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What is a 34 hour restart?
  • The regulations allow you to "restart" your 60 or 70 hour clock calculations after having at least 34 consecutive hours off duty
  • If you drive less than 34 hours in 7 days, all your hours will reset
  • After you have been on duty for 34 hours, you must take a 70 hour break
  • If you take at least two 17 hour breaks within an 8 day period, all your hours will reset
This is a question from page 93 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

The 34 Hour Restart

The regulations allow you to "restart" your 60 or 70 hour clock calculations after having at least 34 consecutive hours off duty. In other words, after you have taken at least 34 hours off duty in a row, you have the full 60 or 70 hours available again. You would then begin counting hours on the day of the restart and not go back the full 7 or 8 days.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

If you are planning to become an OTR truck driver, you will use the 8 day / 70 hour limit. That means, you are unable to drive once you've been on duty for more than 70 hours within an 8 day period. If you've worked close to that limit, you may want to "reset" the 70 hour limit. The only way to completely reset your 70 hour limit is to take an extended amount of time off duty. If you take 34 consecutive hours off without driving or performing on duty tasks, your 70 hour limit will reset.

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Is the following example within legal HOS limits?

- A trucker starts driving at 12:00pm

- At 5pm the driver takes a 1 hour break

- At 6pm the driver begins driving again

- At 11:30pm, the driver shuts down and goes off duty for 10 consecutive hours

  • No, the driver exceeded his legal drive time by 30 minutes
  • No, the driver did not satisfy the 30 minute break requirement
  • No, the driver exceeded his 14 hour on duty time
  • Yes, the example is legal
This is a question from page 93 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

During the 14 consecutive hour on duty period, you are only allowed to drive your truck for up to 11 total hours. Once you have driven a total of 11 hours, you have reached the driving limit and must be off duty for another 10 consecutive hours before driving your truck again.

There are times when you will be required to take a 30 minute break. If you have been on duty for more than 8 consecutive hours without at least 30 minutes off duty, you are not allowed to operate a CMV until a 30 minute break is taken. You may perform on duty tasks but you cannot drive.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Let's go through the example together:

Beginning the day:

In this hypothetical situation, a driver begins his day at 12pm. At that point, both his 14 hour on duty clock and 11 hour driving clock have started.

Taking a break

When the driver takes his 1 hour break, his 11hr clock stops. At this point, since he is no longer driving, only his 14 hour clock continues to run. This break also satisfies the 30 minute break provision. So far, here's how his time looks:

  • 14 hour clock: 9 hours remaining (will be 8 hours remaining once his break is complete).
  • 11 hour clock: 6 hours remaining (will remain 6 hours throughout his entire break).
Resume driving:

So, after the driver takes his 1 hour break, he still has 9 hours on his 14 hour on duty clock and 6 hours on his 11 hour driving clock remaining. Since he took 1 hour off duty, he now has 8 more consecutive hours that he can drive without taking a 30 minute break off duty.

Shutting down:

It has now been 5.5 hours since the driver took his break. So let's look at our remaining hours again.

  • 14 hour clock: The driver had 8 hours remaining once he started driving again after his break and 5.5 hours have passed since then. The driver still has 2.5 hours remaining on his 14 hour on duty limit.
  • 11 hour clock: The driver had 6 hours remaining after his break. He has driven an additional 5.5 hours since then. That means the driver still has 30 minutes remaining on his 11 hour driving clock.

So yes, this driver is indeed legal! And once he takes 10 consecutive hours off, he can do it all over again.

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Which day below contains at least 1 violation?

Day 1

Day 2

  • Day 1 contains at least 1 violation
  • Day 2 contains at least 1 violation
  • Both days contain violations
  • There are no violations on either day
This is a question from page 104 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Day 1

Day 2

Violations:There are no violations.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 11 hours of driving time available at 2:00 a.m. on Day 1. The driver used those 11 hours by 3:00 p.m. when he or she entered the sleeper berth for 8 consecutive hours. Because the driver accumulated at least 10 hours of rest using a combination of at least 8 consecutive hours in a sleeper berth and another break of at least 2 consecutive hours, he or she was eligible for the split sleeper berth provision. This moves the calculation point to the end of the first of the two periods of rest, or 9:00 a.m. on Day 1. Starting the calculation from there, the driver accumulated another 11 hours of driving by 4:00 a.m. on Day 2. By 6:00 a.m. on Day 2, the driver accumulated another pair of qualifying breaks totaling at least 10 hours. This moves the calculation point again, to the end of the first of the two breaks, or 11:00 p.m. on Day 1. From there, the driver accumulated another 11 hours of driving by noon on Day 2. This pattern continued, with no 11 hour violations.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: A 30 minute break is only required when a driver wants to drive a CMV after being on duty for longer than 8 hours without a 30 consecutive minute off duty break. On both days in this example, the driver was never on duty long enough to require a 30 minute break.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: Calculation of the 14 hour limit begins at 2:00 a.m. on Day 1. The driver accumulates 13 hours by 3:00 p.m. before entering the sleeper berth. Because the driver then met the requirements for the split sleeper berth provision, the calculation point moves to the end of the first qualifying break, or 9:00 a.m. on Day 1. So at 11:00 p.m. on Day 1, the driver had accumulated 6 hours (any sleeper berth period of at least 8 but less than 10 consecutive hours is excluded from the 14 hour calculation). By 6:00 a.m. on Day 2, the driver accumulated another pair of qualifying breaks totaling at least 10 hours and has not exceeded the 14 hour duty limit. This moves the calculation point again, to the end of the first of the two breaks, or 11:00 p.m. on Day 1. From there, the driver accumulated 13 of 14 hours by noon on Day 2 (any sleeper berth period of less than 8 hours is included in the 14 hour calculation). This pattern continued, with no violations.

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What is the 8 day / 70 hour on duty limit?
  • You are not allowed to drive after you've been on duty 70 hours in the previous 8 consecutive days
  • You must have taken at least 70 hours off during the previous 8 days in order to drive legally
  • None of these answers are correct
  • You are not allowed to be on duty more than 70 hours within the previous 8 days
This is a question from page 93 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

The 8 day / 70 hour limit:

If your company does operate vehicles every day of the week, your employer may assign you to the 70-hour/8-day schedule. This means that you are not allowed to drive after you've been on duty 70 hours in any 8 consecutive days. Once you reach the 70 hour limit, you will not be able to drive again until you have dropped below 70 hours for an 8 consecutive day period. You may do other work, but you cannot do any more driving until you get below the limit. Any other hours you work, whether they are for a motor carrier or someone else, must be added to the total.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

The 8 day / 70hr limit will restrict how much time you're allowed to be on duty during an 8 day period. So if you take a 10 hour break to reset your 11 and 14 hour clocks, but have been on duty / driving for 65 hours in an 8 day period, you will only be able to drive 5 hours.


We'll give you some more examples later on in the program. This can be a little difficult to understand, but try to understand the differences between the 11hr, 14hr, and 70hr clocks.

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What hours must your logbook show?
  • All 24 hours of every day
  • Only the hours you are on duty or driving
  • Only your resting hours
  • The logbook only needs to show a 12 consecutive hour time frame each day
This is a question from page 97 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

You must account for every day on your log, even days off, unless you are covered by a logbook exception on any of the days. The log must cover all 24 hours of every day.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

All logbooks must show 24 hours for each day and each hour must be accounted for. Even if you were off duty for an entire 24 hour stretch, you must log the entire day as off duty.
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Why should you always plan on arriving to your destination as quickly as possible?
  • Many things can go wrong along the way
  • All of these are reasons to arrive at your destination as quickly as possible
  • Many customers will give you an earlier appointment time if you show up early, even if they said they wouldn't over the phone
  • You might be able to sneak in a 34 hour restart
This is a question from page 108 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Arrive early

It's good practice to always arrive at your destination as quickly as possible. Many things can go wrong along the way. It would be a shame to take your time, only to have something slow you down later on. Always get as close to your customer as possible right away. If you have time to waste, you should waste it near the customer. Far too many drivers lose out on miles because they had a problem en-route and wasted too much time along the way. Not to mention, many customers will give you an earlier appointment time if you show up early, even if they said they wouldn't over the phone.

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After taking 10 consecutive hours off duty, a driver begins to work at 8:00 a.m. The driver may operate a commercial motor vehicle until what time?

  • 8:00 p.m.
  • Midnight
  • 10:00 p.m.
  • 6:00 p.m.
This is a question from page 93 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

The 14 Hour On Duty Limit

This limit is usually thought of as a "daily" limit, even though it is not based on a 24 hour period. You are allowed a period of 14 consecutive hours of on duty time after being off duty for 10 or more consecutive hours. The 14 consecutive hour duty period begins when you start any kind of reportable work (performing vehicle maintenance, loading / unloading cargo, fueling, driving, etc.). Once you have reached the end of this 14 consecutive hour period, you cannot drive again until you have been off duty for another 10 consecutive hours.

Your driving is limited to the 14 consecutive hour on duty period even if you take some off duty time, such as a lunch break or a nap, during those 14 hours.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

While you are only allowed 11 hours of driving after taking a 10 consecutive hour break, you are able to complete those 11 hours at any point during the 14 hour limit.

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