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CDL Practice Test: Logbook Rules

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CDL Practice Test: Logbook Rules

Logbook Rules Questions

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Good Luck!

Which statement below accurately describes the 11 hour driving limit?
  • Once you have driven a total of 11 hours in any 14 consecutive hours of on duty time, you have reached the driving limit and must be off duty for another 10 consecutive hours before driving your truck again
  • You must take 11 consecutive hours off duty before you are allowed to drive
  • You can only drive between the hours of 9am to 8pm each day
  • You may not perform any on duty work (driving or non-driving duties) after 11 consecutive hours have passed since you began your work day
This is a question from page 93 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

The 11 Hour Driving Limit

During the 14 consecutive hour on duty period, you are only allowed to drive your truck for up to 11 total hours. Once you have driven a total of 11 hours, you have reached the driving limit and must be off duty for another 10 consecutive hours before driving your truck again.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

After taking 10 consecutive hours (or more) off duty, you will have a fresh 11 and 14 hour clock. As soon as you begin working (pre-trip inspection, fueling, loading / unloading cargo, driving, etc.) your 14 hour clock starts. Within those 14 hours, you are allowed to actually drive for 11 of those hours. The remaining 3 hours can be used for other non-driving duties (loading / unloading cargo, performing maintenance duties, etc.) as well as taking breaks. The 11 hour clock will only count down if you are actually driving. In other words, the 11 hour clock can be paused. So if you want to take a 30 minute break for lunch, you may do so and stop the 11 hour driving limit. However, your 14 hour clock can't be stopped. If you reach the end of your 14 hour day and still have driving time remaining on the 11 hour clock, you still must stop driving. After 14 hours since you started your day, or after 11 hours of driving (whichever comes first), you can't drive again until you've taken 10 consecutive hours off.

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What violation has occurred on the below log?

  • There is no violation on this log
  • There is a 30 minute break violation
  • There is an 11 hour rule violation
  • There is a 14 hour rule violation
This is a question from page 98 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Violations: There are no violations in this example.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 11 hours of drive time available starting at 1:00 a.m. The driver drove between the hours of 1:00 a.m. and 6:00 a.m. (5 hours), then again between the hours of 7:00 a.m to 10:00 a.m. (3 hours) and finally between the hours of noon to 2:00 p.m (2 hours). Since the driver was allwed a total of 11 hours of drive time but only drove 10 hours (5 + 3 + 2), no violation occurred.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver went on duty at midnight. At that point, the driver could perform driving duties until 8:00 a.m. before a 30 minute break off duty would be required to continue any driving tasks. After driving for 5 hours (on duty for a total of 6 hours) the driver fulfilled the break requirement by spending 1 hour off duty between the hours of 6:00 a.m. and 7:00 a.m. Starting at 7:00 a.m. the driver was allowed to continue driving for the remainder of his/her available 11 and 14 hour limits.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 14 hours available beginning at Midnight. At 2:00 p.m., the driver had reached the end of the 14 hour window (10 hours driving; 3 hours on duty; 1 hour off duty). The driver may not drive a CMV once he or she has reached the end of the 14 consecutive-hour period and in this example, the driver goes off duty for the required 10 consecutive hours starting at 2:00 p.m.

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What does the 14 hour on duty limit mean?
  • From the time you first go on duty after a 10 consecutive hour break, you are allowed 14 consecutive hours to use your 11 hour drive time
  • You are allowed to drive for 7 hours then must take a 7 hour break
  • You must rest for at least 14 consecutive hours each day
  • You can drive up to 14 consecutive hours per day
This is a question from page 93 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

The 14 Hour Duty Limit

This limit is usually thought of as a "daily" limit, even though it is not based on a 24 hour period. You are allowed a period of 14 consecutive-hours of duty time after being off duty for 10 or more consecutive hours. The 14 consecutive hour duty period begins when you start any kind of work (performing vehicle maintenance, loading / unloading cargo, fueling, etc.). Once you have reached the end of this 14 consecutive hour period, you cannot drive again until you have been off duty for another 10 consecutive hours.

Your driving is limited to the 14 consecutive hour duty period even if you take some off duty time, such as a lunch break or a nap, during those 14 hours.

Example: You have had 10 continuous hours off and you begin working at 6:00 a.m. (vehicle inspection, fueling, loading / unloading freight, etc.). You must not drive your truck after 8:00 p.m. that evening. You may do other work after 8:00 p.m.(load / unload freight, perform maintenance duties, etc.), but you cannot do any more driving until you have taken another 10 consecutive hours off.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

The 14 hour rule quite simply means that as soon as you begin working for the day, regardless of what time it is, you have 14hrs to complete your day. Once your 14 hours are up, you may not drive again until you have had a minimum of 10 consecutive hours off duty, at which point, your 14 hour clock will reset.

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If you hear on the radio that there is a major snowstorm forecast along your route, will you qualify for the Adverse Driving Conditions Exception?
  • No, weather can never be a reason for using the Adverse Driving Conditions Exception
  • None of these answers are correct
  • No, in order to qualify, the adverse weather event must not have been forecast
  • Yes, anytime hazardous weather is forecast along your route, you may drive an additional 2 hours
This is a question from page 95 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

If unexpected adverse driving conditions slow you down, you may drive up to 2 extra hours to complete what could have been driven in normal conditions. This means you could drive for up to 13 hours, which is 2 hours more than allowed under normal conditions. Adverse driving conditions mean things that you did not know about when you started your run, like snow, fog, or a shut-down of traffic due to a crash. Adverse driving conditions do not include situations that you should have known about, such as congested traffic during typical “rush hour” periods.

Even though you may drive 2 extra hours under this exception, you must not drive after the 14th consecutive hour after coming on duty.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

In order to qualify for the Adverse Driving Conditions Exception, you must be slowed down due to an event which was not forecast.

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Why should you always plan on arriving to your destination as quickly as possible?
  • All of these are reasons to arrive at your destination as quickly as possible
  • Many things can go wrong along the way
  • Many customers will give you an earlier appointment time if you show up early, even if they said they wouldn't over the phone
  • You might be able to sneak in a 34 hour restart
This is a question from page 108 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Arrive early

It's good practice to always arrive at your destination as quickly as possible. Many things can go wrong along the way. It would be a shame to take your time, only to have something slow you down later on. Always get as close to your customer as possible right away. If you have time to waste, you should waste it near the customer. Far too many drivers lose out on miles because they had a problem en-route and wasted too much time along the way. Not to mention, many customers will give you an earlier appointment time if you show up early, even if they said they wouldn't over the phone.

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Every time you pull off the expressway to take a break, you use about how much time off your 11-hour driving limit?
  • About 10 minutes
  • About 5 minutes
  • About 1 minute
  • About 30 minutes
This is a question from page 108 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Bonus Tip: Stay Away From Caffeine!

Alright, well, you don't have to completely stay away from caffeine. Everyone needs a pick-me-up now and then. But remember, every time you stop, you are using up about 10 minutes from your log. By taking in a lot of caffeine, you'll certainly have to stop more frequently. You should try to limit your caffeine intake and as long as you're being safe and healthy, limit the amount of any fluids you're drinking. This may seem like a ridiculous tip, but drivers who "think outside the box" are generally rewarded with higher earnings. Remember, every minute counts!

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Which statement is true?
  • When using the split sleeper berth rule, you can take your 10 hour break by splitting 8 hours off in the sleeper berth and taking an additional 2 hours off duty
  • All of these statements are true
  • If you spend 8 consecutive hours in the sleeper berth, you can extend your 14 hour limit
  • If you spend 10 consecutive hours off duty or in a sleeper berth of your truck, your 11 and 14 hour limits completely restart
This is a question from page 95 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

1. Ten consecutive hours off duty:

You may spend time in your sleeper berth to get some of, or all of, the 10 consecutive hours of off duty time. When getting your 10 consecutive hours of off duty time, what is most important is that you do not go on duty or drive during those 10 hours. At the end of the 10 consecutive hours of combined sleeper and/or off duty time, your 11-hour driving and 14 hour duty-period limits would completely restart.

2. Eight hours of sleeper berth time:

You may also use the sleeper berth to extend the 14 hour limit. Any period in the sleeper berth of at least 8 consecutive hours will not count as part of the 14 hours, and, therefore, would allow you to extend the time during which you could use your maximum 11 hours of driving.

3. Split sleeper / off duty time:

You may also use the sleeper berth in a different way to get the “equivalent of at least 10 consecutive hours off duty.” To do this, two rest periods are required. You must spend at least one of the two required rest periods in your sleeper berth. The required rest period in the sleeper berth must be at least 8 consecutive hours (but less than 10 consecutive hours). This rest period will not count as part of the 14 hours. The other, separate, rest period must be at least 2 consecutive hours (but less than 10 consecutive hours). This rest period may be spent in the sleeper berth, off duty, or sleeper berth and off duty combined. It will count as part of the 14 hours (unless you spend at least 8 consecutive hours in the sleeper berth). It does not matter which rest period you take first. After you complete your second re­quired rest period, you will have a new point on the clock from which to calculate your hours available. This new “calculation point” will be at the time you completed your first required rest period.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

The Sleeper Berth Provision is extremely important for you to be familiar with. It is one of the most confusing parts about the HOS regulations, yet, if you know the rules it will make your life much easier and help your paycheck at the same time. With more and more companies switching to electronic logbooks, understanding all the ways you can legally drive is critically important.

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Under the adverse driving conditions exception, how many additional hours can you drive?
  • 2 extra hours
  • 5 extra hours
  • 3 extra hours
  • 4 extra hours
This is a question from page 95 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

What Is the Adverse Driving Conditions Exception?

If unexpected adverse driving conditions slow you down, you may drive up to 2 extra hours to complete what could have been driven in normal conditions. This means you could drive for up to 13 hours, which is 2 hours more than allowed under normal conditions. Adverse driving conditions mean things that you did not know about when you started your run, like snow, fog, or a shut-down of traffic due to a crash. Adverse driving conditions do not include situations that you should have known about, such as congested traffic during typical “rush hour” periods.

Even though you may drive 2 extra hours under this exception, you must not drive after the 14th consecutive hour after coming on duty.

Example: You begin to work at 7:00 a.m., start driving at 8:00 a.m., and drive 9 hours when you hit heavy fog at 5:00 p.m. The fog was not forecasted. At this point, the adverse driving conditions exception would allow you to drive for 4 more hours (2 hours to get to 11 and 2 extra hours due to the fog), taking you to 9:00 p.m. for a total of 13 hours of driving.

If, however, you come to work at 7:00 a.m., start driving at 12:00 p.m. and drive into fog at 5:00 p.m., you could still only drive until 9:00 p.m. for a total of 9 hours of driving. You would have to stop driving at 9:00 p.m. because you would have reached the 14 hour limit.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

The adverse driving conditions exception may come in handy from time to time. If you run into unexpected weather conditions or have an unexpected delay such as a road closure, you can extend your 11 hour driving limit. Don't take advantage of this exception, but by all means use it when necessary. Just be sure to mark the time, location and type of the unexpected weather hazard on your logbook.

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