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CDL Practice Test: Logbook Rules

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CDL Practice Test: Logbook Rules

Logbook Rules Questions

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On what day and time does a 14 hour rule violation occur?

Day 1

Day 2

  • Day 2 at 5:00 a.m.
  • Day 2 at 2:00 a.m.
  • There is no 14 hour rule violation
  • Day 2 at 4:00 p.m.
This is a question from page 102 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Day 1

Day 2

Violations: There is an 11 hour rule violation from 5:00 a.m. - 7:00 a.m. on Day 2.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 hours off duty, the driver had 11 hours of driving time available at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. By 2:00 a.m. on Day 2, the driver had 3 hours remaining, and exceeded the limit, by 2 hours, starting at 5:00 a.m. Then, because the driver accumulated at least 10 hours of rest using a combination of at least 8 consecutive hours in a sleeper berth and another break of at least 2 consecutive hours (in this case, 8), he or she was eligible for the split sleeper berth provision. This moves the calculation point to the end of the first of the two periods of rest, or 2:00 a.m. on Day 2. Between 2:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m., the driver had 5 hours of driving, so at 3:00 p.m. on Day 2 there were 6 hours remaining, which the driver used by 9:00 p.m. Because the driver then took at least 2 consecutive hours off duty, he or she accumulated another 10 hours of rest in two separate, qualifying periods totaling 10 hours. This moves the calculation point again, to 3:00 p.m. on Day 2, and at 11:00 p.m. on Day 2 the driver has 5 hours of driving time remaining.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: On Day 1, the driver required a 30 minute break at 6:00 p.m. in order to continue driving. But since the driver went into the sleeper berth and stayed there for 8 hours, the requirement was no longer needed. On Day 2, the driver never stayed on duty long enough to require a 30 minute break.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: Calculation of the 14 hour limit begins at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. The driver accumulates 8 hours of driving time by 6:00 p.m. before entering the sleeper berth. Because any sleeper berth period of at least 8 (but less than 10) consecutive hours is excluded from the 14 hour calculation, the driver accumulated just 13 hours by 7:00 a.m. on Day 2. The driver then met the requirements for the split sleeper berth provision, so the calculation point moves to the end of the first qualifying break, or 2:00 a.m. on Day 2. Starting from there, the driver accumulated 11 hours by 9:00 p.m. on Day 2. The driver again met the requirements for the split sleeper berth provision by getting 2 hours of rest, so the calculation point moves to 3:00 p.m. and the driver remains in compliance.

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Which statement about EOBR's is true?
  • If I run out of hours, the EOBR will shut down my truck
  • If I’m forced to use an EOBR, I’ll have less time behind the wheel
  • EOBRs require me to enter data while I'm driving
  • None of these statements are true
This is a question from page 106 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

As with any major change within any industry, there has been some resistance to EOBRs. Let's bust some of the many myths and concerns you may hear about EOBRs.

“If I’m forced to use an EOBR, I’ll have less time behind the wheel.”

This is not true. Some drivers even claim EOBRs actually help them gain more time on the road. While paper log books require drivers to round up to the nearest 15 minutes, EOBRs record on-duty status right down to the minute. Over the course of a week, that can add up to hours of time on the road.

Additionally, most carriers will have access to your available driving hours at all times. That means carriers can more accurately plan your next load and use your available hours more efficiently. That leads to less downtime and more time driving.

“EOBRs require me to enter data while I'm driving which is unsafe.”

Drivers must log in to their EOBR at the beginning of their shift and log off when they’re finished for the day. As EOBRs detect when the truck is either moving or stationary, they can automatically record changes in duty status. Driver interaction while the truck’s in motion is never needed, though a countdown timer is available, ensuring you never find yourself out on the highway, unaware that you were nearly out of hours.

“An EOBR tells the government where I am and what I’m doing. I don’t want ‘big brother’ in my cab!”

Not true. Only the trucking company employees that you work for, who are authorized to view your EOBR data through, will be able to pinpoint your location. If the DOT demands an audit, they may view location-based data from your electronic logs, but they will not know your every move. It’s the same process as an audit of your paper logs, except that electronic driver logs save time and are more accurate.

“If I run out of hours, the EOBR will shut down my truck.”

Not true. Sure, remote shutdown technology is out there, but it’s not an EOBR standard. EOBRs were simply designed to record engine data—they don’t take control of your vehicle. Decisions about where a truck may safely be stopped are best left in the driver’s hands.

“EOBRs don’t make safer drivers.”

The answer is yes and no. EOBRs don’t dictate a truck’s speed, following distances, or lane changes. It also doesn't guarantee a driver is resting during his sleeper berth or off-duty time. And finally, on occasion, EOBR's will show available hours when a driver is not safe to drive. However, they do let drivers know how much time they have left behind the wheel each day. It also ensures that carriers can't "force" their drivers to drive illegally.

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Which violation occurs on the below example?

  • There is a 14 hour rule violation
  • There is an 11 hour rule violation
  • There are no violations on this log
  • There is a 30 minute break violation
This is a question from page 98 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Violations: There is a 14 hour rule violation from 9:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver was eligible to drive for up to 11 hours beginning at 2:00 a.m. The driver drove for just 1 hour between 9:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m., far below the 11 hour driving limit.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: The driver never drove a CMV after being on duty for more than 8 hours. Therefore, no violation has occurred.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 14 hours available beginning at 2:00 a.m. Because the 14 hour calculation includes all off duty time of less than 10 consecutive hours, all of this driver's time between 2:00 a.m. and 10:00 p.m. is included in the calculation. Even though the driver spent 9 consecutive hours off duty, the 14 hour limit does not get extended. In order for an 8 consecutive hour (or longer) break to extend the 14 hour limit, the 8 consecutive hours must occur in the sleeper berth. However, the driver could have spent 10 hours off duty and both the 11 and 14 hour limits would have reset. The driver reached the 14 hour limit at 4:00 p.m. and violated the 14 hour rule at 9:00 p.m. by driving a CMV beyond the 14 hour duty limit.

NOTE: Even though this driver had 10 hours off duty during the day and only drove for 1 hour, that hour of driving was done in violation of the 14 hour rule. The driver did not obtain another 10 consecutive hours off duty, so the calculation point does not change and the 9-hour break must be included in the calculation of the 14 hour limit. After 10:00 p.m., the driver must be off duty for at least 10 consecutive hours, or in a sleeper berth for at least 8 consecutive hours, before driving again.

To remain in compliance: The driver should not have driven after 4:00 p.m., which was the end of the 14 hour limit. If he or she had gone into a sleeper berth for the 9 hour break, that break would have been excluded from the 14 hour calculation and the driver would have remained in compliance. Furthermore, the driver could have elected to remain off duty until 10:00 p.m. for a total of 10 hours off duty which would have reset both the 11 hour and 14 hour limits.

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A 30 minute break violation occurs on the below example. What day and time does the violation occur?

Day 1

Day 2

  • Day 2 at 3:00 a.m.
  • Day 1 at 6:00 p.m.
  • Day 2 at 2:00 p.m.
  • Day 2 at 3:00 p.m.
This is a question from page 99 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Day 1

Day 2

Violations: There is a 30 minute break violation from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Day 1.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver was eligible to drive for up to 11 hours beginning at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1, but only drove 9 hours before entering the sleeper berth. With only 8 hours in the sleeper berth, the calculation point does not change, so the driver had 2 hours remaining to drive at 3:00 a.m. on Day 2. After reaching the 11 hour limit at 5:00 a.m. on Day 2, the driver went off duty for at least 2 consecutive hours, making him or her eligible for the split sleeper berth provision. In other words, the driver accumulated at least 10 hours of rest using a combination of at least 8 consecutive hours in the sleeper berth (7:00 p.m. on Day 1 to 3:00 a.m. on Day 2) and another off duty break of at least 2 consecutive hours (5:00 a.m. to 7:00 a.m. on Day 2). This moves the calculation point to the end of the first of the two periods of rest, or 3:00 a.m. With 2 hours spent driving after 3:00 a.m., the driver had 9 remaining hours by 7:00 a.m. and used only 8 additional hours.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: The driver was required to take at least 30 consecutive minutes off duty by 6:00 p.m. on Day 1 before continuing to drive. Since the driver did not complete this requirement until an hour later, the driver was in violation from 6:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. on Day 1. On Day 2 the driver was on duty longer than 8 consecutive hours. This is perfectly legal. The rules only state that a driver may not drive after being on duty longer than 8 consecutive hours without first taking a 30 consecutive minute break. So remaining on duty without a break beyond 8 hours is legal unless any driving takes place. Since no driving took place after 3:00 p.m. on Day 2, no violation occurred on that day.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 14 hours available at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. By 7:00 p.m. on Day 1, the driver had 5 hours remaining (but only 2 hours of driving available). At 3:00 a.m. on Day 2, the driver still had 5 hours remaining, because any sleeper berth period of at least 8 but less than 10 consecutive hours is excluded from the 14 hour calculation. By 7:00 a.m. on Day 2, the driver had taken 8 consecutive hours in a sleeper berth plus another 2 consecutive hours off duty, making him or her eligible to use the split sleeper berth provision. This moves the 14 hour calculation point to 3:00 a.m. Therefore, at 7:00 a.m. on Day 2, the driver had 10 hours of time remaining (14 hour limit - 2 hours driving - 2 hours off duty = 10 total hours remaining) and used only 9 hours before the end of Day 2.

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Why Do HOS Regulations Exist?
  • To reduce accidents caused by driver fatigue
  • To ensure drivers are being paid at least minimum wage
  • All of these answers are true
  • To keep drivers from sitting too long between load assignments
This is a question from page 92 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Why Do HOS Regulations Exist?

The purpose of HOS regulations is to reduce accidents caused by driver fatigue. Many drivers don't like being told when they can and can't drive, but as you can see in Figure 13-1 below, the risk of an accident is directly related to how many hours a driver has been behind the wheel. HOS regulations were designed so that drivers wouldn't push themselves too far and also so that carriers can't force drivers to drive beyond their limits.

Figure 13-1

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Every time you pull off the expressway to take a break, you use about how much time off your 11-hour driving limit?
  • About 1 minute
  • About 5 minutes
  • About 10 minutes
  • About 30 minutes
This is a question from page 108 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Bonus Tip: Stay Away From Caffeine!

Alright, well, you don't have to completely stay away from caffeine. Everyone needs a pick-me-up now and then. But remember, every time you stop, you are using up about 10 minutes from your log. By taking in a lot of caffeine, you'll certainly have to stop more frequently. You should try to limit your caffeine intake and as long as you're being safe and healthy, limit the amount of any fluids you're drinking. This may seem like a ridiculous tip, but drivers who "think outside the box" are generally rewarded with higher earnings. Remember, every minute counts!

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EOBR's are required to automatically record which of the following?
  • All of these answers are correct
  • Engine use
  • Road speed
  • Miles driven
This is a question from page 106 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Manufacturers of EOBRs must certify that their devices meet the minimum requirements. This includes a requirement that an EOBR must be mechanically or electronically connected to the truck to automatically record, at a minimum, engine use, road speed, miles driven, the date, and time of day. Drivers enter other information required to complete the hours-of-service records. The vast majority of EOBRs now use GPS tracking to meet these requirements.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Most EOBRs are integrated within satellite communication systems that drivers and dispatchers use to communicate with each other.

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What violation has occurred on the below log?

  • There is no violation on this log
  • There is a 30 minute break violation
  • There is a 14 hour rule violation
  • There is an 11 hour rule violation
This is a question from page 98 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Violations: There are no violations in this example.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 11 hours of drive time available starting at 1:00 a.m. The driver drove between the hours of 1:00 a.m. and 6:00 a.m. (5 hours), then again between the hours of 7:00 a.m to 10:00 a.m. (3 hours) and finally between the hours of noon to 2:00 p.m (2 hours). Since the driver was allwed a total of 11 hours of drive time but only drove 10 hours (5 + 3 + 2), no violation occurred.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver went on duty at midnight. At that point, the driver could perform driving duties until 8:00 a.m. before a 30 minute break off duty would be required to continue any driving tasks. After driving for 5 hours (on duty for a total of 6 hours) the driver fulfilled the break requirement by spending 1 hour off duty between the hours of 6:00 a.m. and 7:00 a.m. Starting at 7:00 a.m. the driver was allowed to continue driving for the remainder of his/her available 11 and 14 hour limits.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 14 hours available beginning at Midnight. At 2:00 p.m., the driver had reached the end of the 14 hour window (10 hours driving; 3 hours on duty; 1 hour off duty). The driver may not drive a CMV once he or she has reached the end of the 14 consecutive-hour period and in this example, the driver goes off duty for the required 10 consecutive hours starting at 2:00 p.m.

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