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CDL Practice Test: Logbook Rules

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CDL Practice Test: Logbook Rules

Logbook Rules Questions

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Good Luck!

Is the below example a completed 34 hour restart?

Day 1

Day 2

  • No, the driver didn't complete two rest periods between 1:00 a.m. and 5:00 a.m.
  • None of these answers are correct
  • No, the driver didn't spend enough time off duty to complete the restart
  • Yes, the restart has been completed
This is a question from page 105 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Day 1





Day 2






Explanation - 34 Hour Restart: This example shows a 34 hour restart which is incomplete. While the driver took a total of 34 hours off duty from 4:00 a.m. on Day 1 until 4:00 p.m. on Day 2 (total of 36 hours off duty) the driver still did not meet the requirements. Two rest periods must be taken between the hours of 1:00 a.m. to 5:00 a.m. and in this example, only one rest period during those hours were completed (Day 2). This driver is not necessarily in violation of any rules, but he/she still must count back the previous 8 days when calculating the 70 hour limit as the 34 hour break did not reset the 70 hour limit.

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Which statement about EOBR's is true?
  • None of these statements are true
  • If I’m forced to use an EOBR, I’ll have less time behind the wheel
  • EOBRs require me to enter data while I'm driving
  • If I run out of hours, the EOBR will shut down my truck
This is a question from page 106 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

As with any major change within any industry, there has been some resistance to EOBRs. Let's bust some of the many myths and concerns you may hear about EOBRs.

“If I’m forced to use an EOBR, I’ll have less time behind the wheel.”

This is not true. Some drivers even claim EOBRs actually help them gain more time on the road. While paper log books require drivers to round up to the nearest 15 minutes, EOBRs record on-duty status right down to the minute. Over the course of a week, that can add up to hours of time on the road.

Additionally, most carriers will have access to your available driving hours at all times. That means carriers can more accurately plan your next load and use your available hours more efficiently. That leads to less downtime and more time driving.

“EOBRs require me to enter data while I'm driving which is unsafe.”

Drivers must log in to their EOBR at the beginning of their shift and log off when they’re finished for the day. As EOBRs detect when the truck is either moving or stationary, they can automatically record changes in duty status. Driver interaction while the truck’s in motion is never needed, though a countdown timer is available, ensuring you never find yourself out on the highway, unaware that you were nearly out of hours.

“An EOBR tells the government where I am and what I’m doing. I don’t want ‘big brother’ in my cab!”

Not true. Only the trucking company employees that you work for, who are authorized to view your EOBR data through, will be able to pinpoint your location. If the DOT demands an audit, they may view location-based data from your electronic logs, but they will not know your every move. It’s the same process as an audit of your paper logs, except that electronic driver logs save time and are more accurate.

“If I run out of hours, the EOBR will shut down my truck.”

Not true. Sure, remote shutdown technology is out there, but it’s not an EOBR standard. EOBRs were simply designed to record engine data—they don’t take control of your vehicle. Decisions about where a truck may safely be stopped are best left in the driver’s hands.

“EOBRs don’t make safer drivers.”

The answer is yes and no. EOBRs don’t dictate a truck’s speed, following distances, or lane changes. It also doesn't guarantee a driver is resting during his sleeper berth or off-duty time. And finally, on occasion, EOBR's will show available hours when a driver is not safe to drive. However, they do let drivers know how much time they have left behind the wheel each day. It also ensures that carriers can't "force" their drivers to drive illegally.

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As a way to maximize all time available, you should always do the following:

  • All of these answers are correct
  • Know where your breaks will be taken along your routing
  • Know where you will fuel before you begin your trip
  • Plan ahead for unexpected delays
This is a question from page 107 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Plan Your Trip

While proper trip planning has always been important, it's even more important while driving with an EOBR. Let's face it, drivers weren't exactly honest driving with paper logs. If they didn't plan a trip correctly and couldn't make their pickup or delivery on time, the problem could be easily resolved by lying on the logbook. Not only is this practice illegal, but it's nearly impossible to do on electronic logs. Before you accept a load, you should plan out all of the details of your trip including the following:

  • Know where you will fuel.
  • Know where you will take your breaks.
  • Plan your route and be sure you have the correct directions to each location you will be going to.
  • Schedule an ETA for your arrival at your destination.
  • If your trip will take longer than 1 day, plan out each day of your trip.
  • Leave yourself some cushion room in case of a road closure, unexpected traffic, a weather event, etc.
    • If you can make your trip safely and legally but you don't have a comfortable cushion time, inform your dispatcher about the situation before taking the load.
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If you hear on the radio that there is a major snowstorm forecast along your route, will you qualify for the Adverse Driving Conditions Exception?
  • None of these answers are correct
  • Yes, anytime hazardous weather is forecast along your route, you may drive an additional 2 hours
  • No, weather can never be a reason for using the Adverse Driving Conditions Exception
  • No, in order to qualify, the adverse weather event must not have been forecast
This is a question from page 95 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

If unexpected adverse driving conditions slow you down, you may drive up to 2 extra hours to complete what could have been driven in normal conditions. This means you could drive for up to 13 hours, which is 2 hours more than allowed under normal conditions. Adverse driving conditions mean things that you did not know about when you started your run, like snow, fog, or a shut-down of traffic due to a crash. Adverse driving conditions do not include situations that you should have known about, such as congested traffic during typical “rush hour” periods.

Even though you may drive 2 extra hours under this exception, you must not drive after the 14th consecutive hour after coming on duty.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

In order to qualify for the Adverse Driving Conditions Exception, you must be slowed down due to an event which was not forecast.

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What violations occurred on Day 2 of this example?

Day 1

Day 2


  • There is a 14 and 11 hour rule violation as well as a 30 minute break violation
  • There is a 14 and 11 hour rule violation
  • There is an 11 hour rule violation and a 30 minute break violation
  • There is a 14 hour rule violation and a 30 minute break violation
This is a question from page 102 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Day 1

Day 2

Violations: There are a total of 3 violations on Day 2. First, there is a 14 hour rule violation from 1:00 a.m. - 2:00 a.m. Second, there is a 30 minute break violation from 8:00 p.m - midnight. And third, there is also an 11 hour rule violation from 11:00 p.m. - midnight.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty using a combination of off duty and sleeper berth time, the driver was eligible to drive for up to 11 hours starting at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. By 2:00 a.m. on Day 2, the driver had driven 9 hours. By obtaining 10 consecutive hours off duty on Day 2, the 11 hour calculation point moved to noon on Day 2, at which point the driver had 11 hours of driving time available again. The driver violated the 11 hour rule by driving beyond the 11 hour limit between 11:00 p.m. and Midnight.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: On Day 1, the driver was never required to take a 30 minute break because the longest stretch of on duty time during the entire day was only 6 consecutive hours. On day 2, the driver never took a minimum of 30 consecutive minutes off duty, even after remaining in the driver's seat for more than 8-hours. At 8:00 p.m. the driver was in violation of the 30 minute break provision and remained in violation for the remainder of the day.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 14 hours available at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. The driver reached the 14 hour limit at midnight (the 5-hour sleeper-berth period is included in the 14 hour calculation because it was less than 8 hours). Though the driver was not eligible to drive a CMV after midnight, he or she was able to continue working on duty without violation, as long as no driving took place (which was done for 1 hour). The driver violated the 14 hour rule by driving a CMV at 1:00 a.m. Then, after 10 consecutive hours off duty, the 14 hour calculation point moved to noon on Day 2, at which point the driver had 14 hours available to work again.

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Who enforces HOS regulations?
  • DOT Officials
  • Police Officers
  • Carriers
  • All of these answers are correct
This is a question from page 92 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Who Enforces HOS Regulations?

Law enforcement:

Generally, DOT officers are the ones who enforce HOS rules, although any police officer may inspect a driver's logbook. Individual states are responsible for maintaining weigh stations where drivers are pulled in for random vehicle and logbook inspections. Drivers may also be pulled over for random checks by police officers or DOT officials at any time and have their logbooks inspected. While it's not a frequent occurrence, chances are your logbook will be checked every now and then. Be ready for it at all times!

Carriers:

In addition to law enforcement and DOT officials, most carriers have their own company policies regarding logbooks. A drivers logs are frequently reviewed by internal auditors for discrepancies or violations. A driver with too many violations might be warned, disciplined, or terminated (terminating a driver usually only occurs after several violations). The increased use of electronic logging devices has forced carriers to crack down on HOS violations even more.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

You should always be prepared for a random inspection. Your logs must always be current. If you get pulled into a weigh station or get pulled over for a random inspection, which does happen, and your logbook is not current, you will be cited for a violation.

The carrier you work for will also have logbook auditors. Companies themselves are required to keep driver logs for a period of time and receive random audits from the DOT. If too many of their drivers have logbook violations, the company can be fined or otherwise penalized. They have an interest in passing those audits so if you cause too many problems for them, they will take action.

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A 30 minute break violation occurs on the below example. What day and time does the violation occur?

Day 1

Day 2

  • Day 2 at 3:00 p.m.
  • Day 2 at 3:00 a.m.
  • Day 2 at 2:00 p.m.
  • Day 1 at 6:00 p.m.
This is a question from page 99 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Day 1

Day 2

Violations: There is a 30 minute break violation from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Day 1.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver was eligible to drive for up to 11 hours beginning at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1, but only drove 9 hours before entering the sleeper berth. With only 8 hours in the sleeper berth, the calculation point does not change, so the driver had 2 hours remaining to drive at 3:00 a.m. on Day 2. After reaching the 11 hour limit at 5:00 a.m. on Day 2, the driver went off duty for at least 2 consecutive hours, making him or her eligible for the split sleeper berth provision. In other words, the driver accumulated at least 10 hours of rest using a combination of at least 8 consecutive hours in the sleeper berth (7:00 p.m. on Day 1 to 3:00 a.m. on Day 2) and another off duty break of at least 2 consecutive hours (5:00 a.m. to 7:00 a.m. on Day 2). This moves the calculation point to the end of the first of the two periods of rest, or 3:00 a.m. With 2 hours spent driving after 3:00 a.m., the driver had 9 remaining hours by 7:00 a.m. and used only 8 additional hours.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: The driver was required to take at least 30 consecutive minutes off duty by 6:00 p.m. on Day 1 before continuing to drive. Since the driver did not complete this requirement until an hour later, the driver was in violation from 6:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. on Day 1. On Day 2 the driver was on duty longer than 8 consecutive hours. This is perfectly legal. The rules only state that a driver may not drive after being on duty longer than 8 consecutive hours without first taking a 30 consecutive minute break. So remaining on duty without a break beyond 8 hours is legal unless any driving takes place. Since no driving took place after 3:00 p.m. on Day 2, no violation occurred on that day.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 14 hours available at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. By 7:00 p.m. on Day 1, the driver had 5 hours remaining (but only 2 hours of driving available). At 3:00 a.m. on Day 2, the driver still had 5 hours remaining, because any sleeper berth period of at least 8 but less than 10 consecutive hours is excluded from the 14 hour calculation. By 7:00 a.m. on Day 2, the driver had taken 8 consecutive hours in a sleeper berth plus another 2 consecutive hours off duty, making him or her eligible to use the split sleeper berth provision. This moves the 14 hour calculation point to 3:00 a.m. Therefore, at 7:00 a.m. on Day 2, the driver had 10 hours of time remaining (14 hour limit - 2 hours driving - 2 hours off duty = 10 total hours remaining) and used only 9 hours before the end of Day 2.

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What happens if an EOBR malfunctions?
  • A broken EOBR will require you to shut down immediately and remain off-duty until the EOBR can be repaired
  • Drivers are still required to have a paper logbook in the truck in case of a malfunction
  • Drivers can call their carrier and have each duty-status changed remotely
  • The driver is expected to use an "honor system" until the issue can be repaired
This is a question from page 106 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

What if my EOBR malfunctions?

As with any electronic device, your EOBR may malfunction or become completely unusable at times. You are still required to have a paper logbook in the truck in case of a malfunction. It is your responsiblity to ensure your paper logbook accounts for all time your EOBR has been down.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Remember, during a random logbook inspection, you may be asked to show that you have a paper logbook in case of an EOBR malfunction.

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