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CDL Practice Test: Logbook Rules

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CDL Practice Test: Logbook Rules

Logbook Rules Questions

Click On The Picture To Begin...

Good Luck!

At what time does a violation occur on this log?

  • 7:00 p.m.
  • 8:00 p.m.
  • 10:00 p.m.
  • 9:00 p.m.
This is a question from page 104 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Violations: There is a 14 hour rule violation from 10:00 p.m. - 11:00 p.m.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 11 hours of driving time available starting at midnight. The driver completed 9 hours of driving by 11:00 p.m. and went off duty, so there are no violations of the 11 hour rule.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: Since the driver was never on duty longer than 8 consecutive hours, the 30 minute break provision was never a factor.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 14 hours available at midnight. The driver used 10 of those hours by 10:00 a.m. before entering the sleeper berth for 8 consecutive hours. The 8 consecutive hour sleeper berth period is excluded from the 14 hour limit, but the 1 hour off duty period connected to that sleeper berth period is not. So the 14 hour limit was reached at 10:00 p.m., 4 hours after the end of the sleeper berth period, and the driver violated the rule by continuing to drive for another hour. To remain in compliance, the driver should have either stopped driving at 10:00 p.m., or remained in the sleeper berth from 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

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What violations occurred on Day 2 of this example?

Day 1

Day 2


  • There is a 14 hour rule violation and a 30 minute break violation
  • There is a 14 and 11 hour rule violation
  • There is an 11 hour rule violation and a 30 minute break violation
  • There is a 14 and 11 hour rule violation as well as a 30 minute break violation
This is a question from page 102 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Day 1

Day 2

Violations: There are a total of 3 violations on Day 2. First, there is a 14 hour rule violation from 1:00 a.m. - 2:00 a.m. Second, there is a 30 minute break violation from 8:00 p.m - midnight. And third, there is also an 11 hour rule violation from 11:00 p.m. - midnight.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty using a combination of off duty and sleeper berth time, the driver was eligible to drive for up to 11 hours starting at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. By 2:00 a.m. on Day 2, the driver had driven 9 hours. By obtaining 10 consecutive hours off duty on Day 2, the 11 hour calculation point moved to noon on Day 2, at which point the driver had 11 hours of driving time available again. The driver violated the 11 hour rule by driving beyond the 11 hour limit between 11:00 p.m. and Midnight.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: On Day 1, the driver was never required to take a 30 minute break because the longest stretch of on duty time during the entire day was only 6 consecutive hours. On day 2, the driver never took a minimum of 30 consecutive minutes off duty, even after remaining in the driver's seat for more than 8-hours. At 8:00 p.m. the driver was in violation of the 30 minute break provision and remained in violation for the remainder of the day.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 14 hours available at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. The driver reached the 14 hour limit at midnight (the 5-hour sleeper-berth period is included in the 14 hour calculation because it was less than 8 hours). Though the driver was not eligible to drive a CMV after midnight, he or she was able to continue working on duty without violation, as long as no driving took place (which was done for 1 hour). The driver violated the 14 hour rule by driving a CMV at 1:00 a.m. Then, after 10 consecutive hours off duty, the 14 hour calculation point moved to noon on Day 2, at which point the driver had 14 hours available to work again.

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When you change your duty status, you must document all of the following except:
  • All of these must be documented
  • The city or town you are in
  • The state you are in
  • The county you are in
This is a question from page 97 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Remarks: This is the area where you must list the city, town, or village, and state abbreviation when a change of duty status occurs. You should also explain any unusual circum­stances or log entries that may be unclear when reviewed later, such as encountering adverse driving conditions.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Law enforcement officers will check all of your paperwork, including receipts or toll records, to make sure your logs are showing the correct locations at the correct times.

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Which day on the example below contains a violation?

Day 1

Day 2

  • There are no violations on Day 1 or Day 2
  • There is a violation on both Day 1 and Day 2
  • There is a violation on Day 2
  • There is a violation on Day 1
This is a question from page 100 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Day 1

Day 2

Violations: There are no violations in this example.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 11 hours of drive time available. The starting calculation point on Day 1 is 11:00 a.m. The driver drove between the hours of 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. (2 hours) then again between 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. (2 hours) and finally between 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. (4 hours) for a total of 8 hours of drive time on Day 1. On Day 2, the driver took 10 consecutive hours off duty (split between off duty and sleeper berth time) which reset the 11 hour limit. The new calculation point for Day 2 is 1:00 p.m. when the driver first began driving that day. Since the driver only drove between the hours of 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. (4 hours), no violation occurred.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: A driver may drive only if 8 hours or less have passed since the end of the driver’s last off duty period of at least 30 minutes. In this example, the starting calculation point is at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. The driver was on duty for 1 hour, drove for 2 hours, was on duty for 3 hours, and then drove 2 more hours - totaling 8 hours (combined driving and on duty time) without taking any time off duty. At 6:00 p.m. on Day 1, the driver takes the required minimum 30 minute off duty break until 6:30 p.m. This allowed the driver to legally complete the 14 hour window at Midnight with 4 more hours of driving and 1 hour of on duty time. While the driver was on duty for 9 hours on Day 2, the driver stopped driving for the day at 5:00 p.m., only 7 hours after taking his/her last off duty break. Therefore, no 30 minute break was required and no violation occurred. The hours spent on duty from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. were legal because no actual driving took place.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 14 hours to perform all driving tasks starting at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. At Midnight, exactly 14 hours later, the driver went off duty for 10 consecutive hours (combination of off duty and sleeper berth) which reset the 14 hour limit. The new starting calculation point for the 14 hour limit was 10:00 a.m. (the first point at which the driver went on duty after taking 10 consecutive hours off duty). After 9 hours of performing a combination of on duty and driving tasks, the driver switched to the sleeper berth for the remainder of Day 2, thus, no violation occurred.

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What does DOT stand for?
  • Department of Timekeeping
  • Diary of Time
  • Days of On-Duty Time
  • Department of Transportation
This is a question from page 92 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

As a truck or bus driver, you'll be required to record and abide by all working and driving limitations which were created by the Department of Transportation (DOT). The rules govern a commercial driver's working and resting hours and are referred to as Hours of Service (HOS) Regulations. In this section we will guide you through the HOS regulations and teach you the best methods of properly recording your hours.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Everyone in trucking refers to the Department of Transportation as "The DOT." If you don't know this, you'll sound like a rookie. You don't want that, do ya!?

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Which statement below is false?
  • Your logbook can be checked by your carrier at anytime
  • The increased use of electronic logging devices has forced carriers to crack down on HOS violations
  • Non-DOT law enforcement officers need probable cause to inspect your logbook
  • Your logbook can be randomly checked anytime you go through a weigh station
This is a question from page 92 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Who Enforces HOS Regulations?

Law enforcement:

Generally, DOT officers are the ones who enforce HOS rules, although any police officer may inspect a driver's logbook. Individual states are responsible for maintaining weigh stations where drivers are pulled in for random vehicle and logbook inspections. Drivers may also be pulled over for random checks by police officers or DOT officials at any time and have their logbooks inspected. While it's not a frequent occurrence, chances are your logbook will be checked every now and then. Be ready for it at all times!

Carriers:

In addition to law enforcement and DOT officials, most carriers have their own company policies regarding logbooks. A drivers logs are frequently reviewed by internal auditors for discrepancies or violations. A driver with too many violations might be warned, disciplined, or terminated (terminating a driver usually only occurs after several violations). The increased use of electronic logging devices (discussed later) has forced carriers to crack down on HOS violations even more.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Your logbook could be checked at anytime for any reason. Make sure it is always updated!

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On what day and time does an 11 hour rule violation occur?

Day 1

Day 2

  • Day 2 at 3:00 a.m.
  • Day 1 at 6:00 p.m.
  • Day 2 at 5:00 a.m.
  • There is no 11 hour rule violation on either day of this example
This is a question from page 101 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Day 1

Day 2

Violations: There is a 30 minute break violation from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Day 1. On Day 2, there is an 11 hour rule violation from 5:00 a.m. - 6:00 a.m.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 11 hours of driving time available at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. At the end of the day, the driver had 2 hours remaining and, without a valid 10 hour break, the driver violated the 11 hour limit by driving an additional 1 hour at 5 a.m. on Day 2.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: As soon as the driver went into an on duty status (driving) at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1, the driver was allowed an 8 consecutive hour time frame to drive a CMV until a 30 minute break had to be taken. The driver did not stop driving until 9 hours had passed, thus violating the 30 minute break provision from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Day 1. On Day 2, the driver was only on duty for a total of 3 hours which does not require a 30 minute break.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: Calculation of the 14 hour limit begins at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. The driver used 9 of 14 available hours on Day 1. Because the driver then got at least 8 consecutive hours in a sleeper berth from 7:00 p.m. on day 1 until 3:00 a.m. on Day 2, that rest break is not included in the 14 hour calculation. The new 14 hour limit calculation point was then 3:00 a.m. with 5 hours remaining (14 available hours - 9 hours used on Day 1). At 6:00 a.m. the driver switched to off duty for the remainder of the day with 2 hours remaining on the 14 hour limit.

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As a way to maximize all time available, you should always do the following:

  • Know where your breaks will be taken along your routing
  • Know where you will fuel before you begin your trip
  • All of these answers are correct
  • Plan ahead for unexpected delays
This is a question from page 107 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Plan Your Trip

While proper trip planning has always been important, it's even more important while driving with an EOBR. Let's face it, drivers weren't exactly honest driving with paper logs. If they didn't plan a trip correctly and couldn't make their pickup or delivery on time, the problem could be easily resolved by lying on the logbook. Not only is this practice illegal, but it's nearly impossible to do on electronic logs. Before you accept a load, you should plan out all of the details of your trip including the following:

  • Know where you will fuel.
  • Know where you will take your breaks.
  • Plan your route and be sure you have the correct directions to each location you will be going to.
  • Schedule an ETA for your arrival at your destination.
  • If your trip will take longer than 1 day, plan out each day of your trip.
  • Leave yourself some cushion room in case of a road closure, unexpected traffic, a weather event, etc.
    • If you can make your trip safely and legally but you don't have a comfortable cushion time, inform your dispatcher about the situation before taking the load.
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