TruckingTruth logo

CDL Practice Test: Logbook Rules

These CDL practice questions are from our High Road Training Program, a CDL test preparation course designed to help you learn the CDL manual.

Our High Road Training Program has the entire CDL manual built right in along with multiple choice questions, a scoring system, and a review system to help reinforce the materials. It's highly effective, super easy to use, and free! Let me tall ya....using The High Road is a thousand times easier than trying to read the entire CDL manual cover to cover.

Click Here To Learn More

CDL Practice Test: Logbook Rules

Logbook Rules Questions

Click On The Picture To Begin

Good Luck!

On what day and time does an 11 hour rule violation occur?

Day 1

Day 2

  • Day 1 at 6:00 p.m.
  • Day 2 at 3:00 a.m.
  • There is no 11 hour rule violation on either day of this example
  • Day 2 at 5:00 a.m.
This is a question from page 101 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Day 1

Day 2

Violations: There is a 30 minute break violation from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Day 1. On Day 2, there is an 11 hour rule violation from 5:00 a.m. - 6:00 a.m.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 11 hours of driving time available at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. At the end of the day, the driver had 2 hours remaining and, without a valid 10 hour break, the driver violated the 11 hour limit by driving an additional 1 hour at 5 a.m. on Day 2.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: As soon as the driver went into an on duty status (driving) at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1, the driver was allowed an 8 consecutive hour time frame to drive a CMV until a 30 minute break had to be taken. The driver did not stop driving until 9 hours had passed, thus violating the 30 minute break provision from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Day 1. On Day 2, the driver was only on duty for a total of 3 hours which does not require a 30 minute break.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: Calculation of the 14 hour limit begins at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. The driver used 9 of 14 available hours on Day 1. Because the driver then got at least 8 consecutive hours in a sleeper berth from 7:00 p.m. on day 1 until 3:00 a.m. on Day 2, that rest break is not included in the 14 hour calculation. The new 14 hour limit calculation point was then 3:00 a.m. with 5 hours remaining (14 available hours - 9 hours used on Day 1). At 6:00 a.m. the driver switched to off duty for the remainder of the day with 2 hours remaining on the 14 hour limit.

Next
Which statement about EOBR's is true?
  • EOBRs require me to enter data while I'm driving
  • If I run out of hours, the EOBR will shut down my truck
  • If I’m forced to use an EOBR, I’ll have less time behind the wheel
  • None of these statements are true
This is a question from page 106 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

As with any major change within any industry, there has been some resistance to EOBRs. Let's bust some of the many myths and concerns you may hear about EOBRs.

“If I’m forced to use an EOBR, I’ll have less time behind the wheel.”

This is not true. Some drivers even claim EOBRs actually help them gain more time on the road. While paper log books require drivers to round up to the nearest 15 minutes, EOBRs record on-duty status right down to the minute. Over the course of a week, that can add up to hours of time on the road.

Additionally, most carriers will have access to your available driving hours at all times. That means carriers can more accurately plan your next load and use your available hours more efficiently. That leads to less downtime and more time driving.

“EOBRs require me to enter data while I'm driving which is unsafe.”

Drivers must log in to their EOBR at the beginning of their shift and log off when they’re finished for the day. As EOBRs detect when the truck is either moving or stationary, they can automatically record changes in duty status. Driver interaction while the truck’s in motion is never needed, though a countdown timer is available, ensuring you never find yourself out on the highway, unaware that you were nearly out of hours.

“An EOBR tells the government where I am and what I’m doing. I don’t want ‘big brother’ in my cab!”

Not true. Only the trucking company employees that you work for, who are authorized to view your EOBR data through, will be able to pinpoint your location. If the DOT demands an audit, they may view location-based data from your electronic logs, but they will not know your every move. It’s the same process as an audit of your paper logs, except that electronic driver logs save time and are more accurate.

“If I run out of hours, the EOBR will shut down my truck.”

Not true. Sure, remote shutdown technology is out there, but it’s not an EOBR standard. EOBRs were simply designed to record engine data—they don’t take control of your vehicle. Decisions about where a truck may safely be stopped are best left in the driver’s hands.

“EOBRs don’t make safer drivers.”

The answer is yes and no. EOBRs don’t dictate a truck’s speed, following distances, or lane changes. It also doesn't guarantee a driver is resting during his sleeper berth or off-duty time. And finally, on occasion, EOBR's will show available hours when a driver is not safe to drive. However, they do let drivers know how much time they have left behind the wheel each day. It also ensures that carriers can't "force" their drivers to drive illegally.

Prev
Next
Which statement is true about extending the 14 hour on duty clock by using the 8 hour sleeper berth provision?
  • You can section the 8 hour break into two 4 hour segments
  • The 8 hours can be split between sleeper berth time and off duty time as long as those hours are consecutive
  • You must spend all 8 hours consecutively in the sleeper berth
  • None of these answers are correct
This is a question from page 95 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Eight hours of sleeper berth time:

You may also use the sleeper berth to extend the 14 hour limit. Any period in the sleeper berth of at least 8 consecutive hours will not count as part of the 14 hours, and, therefore, would allow you to extend the time during which you could use your maximum 11 hours of driving.

Prev
Next
What is a 34 hour restart?
  • If you take at least two 17 hour breaks within an 8 day period, all your hours will reset
  • The regulations allow you to "restart" your 60 or 70 hour clock calculations after having at least 34 consecutive hours off duty
  • If you drive less than 34 hours in 7 days, all your hours will reset
  • After you have been on duty for 34 hours, you must take a 70 hour break
This is a question from page 93 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

The 34 Hour Restart

The regulations allow you to "restart" your 60 or 70 hour clock calculations after having at least 34 consecutive hours off duty. In other words, after you have taken at least 34 hours off duty in a row, you have the full 60 or 70 hours available again. You would then begin counting hours on the day of the restart and not go back the full 7 or 8 days.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

If you are planning to become an OTR truck driver, you will use the 8 day / 70 hour limit. That means, you are unable to drive once you've been on duty for more than 70 hours within an 8 day period. If you've worked close to that limit, you may want to "reset" the 70 hour limit. The only way to completely reset your 70 hour limit is to take an extended amount of time off duty. If you take 34 consecutive hours off without driving or performing on duty tasks, your 70 hour limit will reset.

Prev
Next

What day and time did a violation occur in the below example?

Day 1

Day 2

  • Day 2 at 9 p.m.
  • Day 2 at 6:00 a.m.
  • Day 1 at 4 p.m.
  • Day 2 at 3 a.m.
This is a question from page 98 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Day 1

Day 2

Violations: There is an 11 hour rule violation from 6:00 a.m. to 7:00 a.m. on Day 2.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 hours off duty, the driver had 11 hours of driving time available at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. At the end of Day 1, the driver had 3 hours remaining and, without a valid 10 hour break, the driver violated the 11 hour limit by driving an additional 1 hour from 6:00 a.m. to 7:00 a.m. on Day 2. After taking 10 consecutive hours off duty from 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., the 11 hour limit reset and the new calculation point became 5:00 p.m. with a full 11 hours available.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: On Day 1, the driver began driving at 10:00 a.m. which is the calculation point for the 30 minute break provision. The driver could only drive until 6:00 p.m. which is 8 hours since the last off duty period of at least 30 minutes. The break taken from 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. fulfilled the break requirement. On Day 2, the longest duration the driver was on duty for was 6 hours which is below the 8 hour threshold requiring a break.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: Calculation of the 14 hour limit begins at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. The driver used 9 of 14 hours on Day 1 so 5 hours still remain on the 14 hour limit. The driver then spent 8 consecutive hours in the sleeper berth and that rest break is not included in the 14 hour calculation. So at 3:00 a.m. on Day 2, the driver still had 5 hours remaining on his/her 14 hour limit. After spending 4 hours on duty (driving), the driver then switched to off duty for 10 consecutive hours. That 10 consecutive hour break reset the 14 hour limit and the new calculation point was then 5:00 p.m.

Prev
Next
Which statement below accurately describes the 11 hour driving limit?
  • You can only drive between the hours of 9am to 8pm each day
  • Once you have driven a total of 11 hours in any 14 consecutive hours of on duty time, you have reached the driving limit and must be off duty for another 10 consecutive hours before driving your truck again
  • You may not perform any on duty work (driving or non-driving duties) after 11 consecutive hours have passed since you began your work day
  • You must take 11 consecutive hours off duty before you are allowed to drive
This is a question from page 93 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

The 11 Hour Driving Limit

During the 14 consecutive hour on duty period, you are only allowed to drive your truck for up to 11 total hours. Once you have driven a total of 11 hours, you have reached the driving limit and must be off duty for another 10 consecutive hours before driving your truck again.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

After taking 10 consecutive hours (or more) off duty, you will have a fresh 11 and 14 hour clock. As soon as you begin working (pre-trip inspection, fueling, loading / unloading cargo, driving, etc.) your 14 hour clock starts. Within those 14 hours, you are allowed to actually drive for 11 of those hours. The remaining 3 hours can be used for other non-driving duties (loading / unloading cargo, performing maintenance duties, etc.) as well as taking breaks. The 11 hour clock will only count down if you are actually driving. In other words, the 11 hour clock can be paused. So if you want to take a 30 minute break for lunch, you may do so and stop the 11 hour driving limit. However, your 14 hour clock can't be stopped. If you reach the end of your 14 hour day and still have driving time remaining on the 11 hour clock, you still must stop driving. After 14 hours since you started your day, or after 11 hours of driving (whichever comes first), you can't drive again until you've taken 10 consecutive hours off.

Prev
Next

What violations occurred in this example?

Day 1

Day 2

  • There is a 14 hour rule violation
  • There is a 30 minute break violation
  • There is a 14 hour rule violation as well as a 30 minute break violation
  • There are no violations
This is a question from page 103 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Day 1

Day 2

Violations: There is a 14 hour rule violation from 5:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m. on Day 2.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver was eligible to drive for up to 11 hours at 5:00 a.m. on Day 1. Before obtaining another 10 consecutive hour break (beginning at 9:00 a.m. on Day 2), he or she drove for only 7 hours, well within the limit.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: All requirements for the 30 minute break provision were met. The driver never drove after being on duty for longer than 8 consecutive hours without at least 30 consecutive minutes spent off duty.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 14 hours available at 5:00 a.m. on Day 1.

The 14 hour calculation includes:
  • All off duty time of less than 10 consecutive hours;
  • All sleeper-berth time of less than 8 hours; and
  • All on duty and driving time.

Therefore, the driver reached the 14 hour limit at 7:00 p.m. on Day 1, and the violation began when the driver drove a CMV at 5:00 a.m. on Day 2.

NOTE: Although this driver had 15½ hours off duty between 9:00 a.m. on Day 1 and 1:00 a.m. on Day 2, that off duty time was interrupted by a period of 30 minutes on duty (3:00 p.m. on Day 1). Therefore, both the 6-hour sleeper-berth period and the 9½-hour off duty period are included in the 14 hour calculation (the calculation point does not change from 5:00 a.m. on Day 1). In addition, note that the driver can legally work after reaching the 14 hour limit, but cannot drive a commercial motor vehicle.

To remain in compliance, the driver should not have gone on duty from 3:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. on Day 1, or should have remained off duty from 1:00 a.m. - 1:30 a.m. on Day 2, in order to get 10 consecutive hours of off duty time.

Prev
Next
Every time you pull off the expressway to take a break, you use about how much time off your 11-hour driving limit?
  • About 1 minute
  • About 30 minutes
  • About 10 minutes
  • About 5 minutes
This is a question from page 108 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Bonus Tip: Stay Away From Caffeine!

Alright, well, you don't have to completely stay away from caffeine. Everyone needs a pick-me-up now and then. But remember, every time you stop, you are using up about 10 minutes from your log. By taking in a lot of caffeine, you'll certainly have to stop more frequently. You should try to limit your caffeine intake and as long as you're being safe and healthy, limit the amount of any fluids you're drinking. This may seem like a ridiculous tip, but drivers who "think outside the box" are generally rewarded with higher earnings. Remember, every minute counts!

Prev
Finish
Please select an option
[4,4,3,2,2,2,1,3]
8

Ready For A Quiz? Pick A Category:

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only are they fantastic, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! So sign up now and get instant access to our member's section, including:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Private messaging for more personal questions
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

About Us

Picture Of Brett Aquila
TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare you for a great start to your trucking career.