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CDL Practice Test: Logbook Rules

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CDL Practice Test: Logbook Rules

Logbook Rules Questions

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Good Luck!

Which day below contains a 30 minute break violation?

Day 1

Day 2

  • Day 2 contains at least one 30 minute break violation
  • Both days contain at least one 30 minute break violation
  • There are no 30 minute break violations on either day
  • Day 1 contains at least one 30 minute break violation
This is a question from page 104 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Day 1

Day 2

Violations: There is a 30 minute break violation on Day 1 which occurred from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Then, on Day 2, there is another 30 minute break violation from 4:00 p.m. until 9:00 p.m. as well as an 11 hour rule violation from 4:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. and a 14 hour rule violation from 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 11 hours of driving time available at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. After driving 8 hours (3 + 2 + 3), the driver took 8 consecutive hours in the sleeper berth, which, combined with the earlier 2 consecutive hours in the sleeper from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Day 1, made the driver eligible for the split sleeper berth provision. This moves the 11 hour calculation point to the end of the first of the two qualifying breaks, or 9:00 p.m. on Day 1. Between 9:00 p.m. on Day 1 and 8:00 a.m. on Day 2, the driver had 3 hours of driving, so at 8:00 a.m. there were 8 hours remaining (11 - 3), but he or she continued to drive for an additional 5 hours, after reaching the 11 hour limit at 4:00 p.m.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: On Day 1, the driver remained on duty for more than 8 consecutive hours. While remaining on duty for longer than 8 consecutive hours is perfectly legal, the driver may not operate a CMV after being on duty for more than 8 consecutive hours unless a 30 minute break is taken. In the Day 1 example, the driver didn't meet that requirement until being on duty for 9 hours (1 hour beyond the limit), thereby violating the 30 minute break provision from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. The driver also failed to take a 30 minute break on Day 2. Since the driver was on duty (driving) for more than 8 hours beginning at 4:00 p.m., all drive time after 4:00 p.m. was in violation of the 30 minute break provision.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 14 hours available at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. The driver reached the 14 hour limit at midnight (the 2 hour sleeper berth period is included in the 14 hour calculation because it is less than 8 hours). The driver then entered the sleeper berth for 8 consecutive hours and took advantage of the split sleeper berth provision. This moves the 14 hour calculation point to 9:00 p.m. on Day 1, the end of the first of the two qualifying breaks. Counting forward from there (and excluding the 8-hour sleeper period), the driver had 11 hours remaining as of 8:00 a.m. on Day 2. Those 11 hours were used up by 7:00 pm

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If you have used up all of your 14 hour on duty time, how many hours would you regain after an 8 hour break in the sleeper berth?
  • You will still have no hours remaining
  • None of these answers are correct
  • Your 14 hour limit would reset
  • You would regain half of your hours (7 hours total)
This is a question from page 95 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Eight hours of sleeper berth time:

You may also use the sleeper berth to extend the 14 hour limit. Any period in the sleeper berth of at least 8 consecutive hours will not count as part of the 14 hours, and, therefore, would allow you to extend the time during which you could use your maximum 11 hours of driving.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

An 8 hour break will never add more hours to any of your limits. Rather, an 8 hour break simply extends your time by not counting the break against your 14 hour duty clock. The concept is confusing, but it's actually very simple. Here are some examples.

  • If you have 5 hours remaining on your 14 hour duty clock then go into the sleeper berth for 8 hours, at the end of your break you will still have 5 hours remaining.
  • If you have 1 hour remaining on your 14 hour duty clock then go into the sleeper berth for 8 hours, at the end of your break you will still have 1 hour remaining.
  • If you have 0 hours remaining on your 14 hour duty clock then go into the sleeper berth for 8 hours, at the end of your break you will still have 0 hours remaining.
  • As you can see, you will not gain any hours back after taking an 8 hour break. Instead, your available hours have simply been extended.

    So why would you ever want to take an 8 hour break instead of a 10 hour break? Here's an example:

    Let's say you have a delivery in the morning, but you are not allowed to park at your delivery location overnight. Instead, you have to stop at a truck stop 20 miles away to park for the night. In order to make your appointment on time, you must leave after only resting for 8 hours. If that's the case, you can still make the delivery on time by taking an 8 hour break instead of a full 10 hour break.

    Little situations like this will come up frequently as a truck driver. That's why it's so important to understand these little loopholes and tricks. We'll go through more examples later on in this section, but try to have a full understanding of the 10, 8 and split sleeper rules.

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How many violations occur on the below example?

Day 1

Day 2

  • 0
  • 3
  • 2
  • 1
This is a question from page 100 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Day 1

Day 2

Violations: Day 2 contains 2 violations. There is a 14 hour rule violation from 8:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m. and a 30 minute break violation from 8:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 11 hours of driving time available at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. The driver completed 11 hours of driving by 10:00 a.m. on Day 2 and was not eligible for more driving until taking time off duty. Because the driver had 8 consecutive hours in a sleeper berth and then 2 consecutive hours off duty, he or she was eligible for the split sleeper berth provision, meaning, the driver accumulated at least 10 hours of rest using a combination of at least 8 consecutive hours in a sleeper berth and another break of at least 2 consecutive hours. This moves the 11 hour calculation point to the end of the first of the two qualifying breaks, or 8:00 a.m. on Day 2. Counting forward from there, the driver had 2 hours of driving plus an additional 9 hours of driving for a total of 11, with no violations.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: On Day 1, the driver was never on duty long enough to require a 30 minute break. But on Day 2, once the driver went on duty (driving) at noon, he/she had to complete a 30 minute break by 8:00 p.m. before driving any further. The driver continued to drive beyond that limit by one hour. From 8:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. the driver was in violation of the 30 minute break provision.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 14 hours available at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. The driver reached the 14 hour limit at midnight (note that all off duty periods of less than 10 hours are included in the calculation). The driver then entered the sleeper berth for 8 consecutive hours, which is excluded from the 14 hour calculation. But because the driver did not have an earlier 2 hour break and did not obtain 10 consecutive hours off duty, the calculation point does not move (that is, the 14 hour calculation continues from Day 1 into Day 2). At 8:00 a.m. on Day 2, the driver was still at the 14 hour limit and had no time remaining. He or she violated the rule by driving for 2 more hours. The driver then took 2 consecutive hours off duty and was able to take advantage of the split sleeper berth provision. The calculation point moves to 8:00 a.m. on Day 2 (the end of the first period used in the “split”), and counting forward from there the driver accumulated just 13 hours by 9:00 p.m., within the limits.

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What violation has occurred at 10:00 a.m. on Day 2?

Day 1

Day 2

  • There is no violation at 10:00 a.m.
  • There is a 30 minute break violation
  • There is a 14 hour rule violation
  • There is an 11 hour rule violation
This is a question from page 102 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Day 1

Day 2

Violations: There is an 11 hour rule violation from 12:30 p.m. - 1:00 p.m., and a 14 hour rule violation from noon - 1:00 p.m., both on Day 2.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 11 hours of driving time available at 10:00 a.m. After 7 1/2 hours of driving (3 + 2 1/2 + 2), the driver entered the sleeper berth for 2 consecutive hours, making him or her eligible for the split sleeper berth provision. The driver accumulated at least 10 hours of rest using a combination of at least 8 (but less than 10) consecutive hours in a sleeper berth and another break of at least 2 (but less than 10) consecutive hours. This moves the calculation point to the end of the first of the two qualifying periods of rest, or 10:00 p.m. on Day 1. The next 11 hour calculation starts there, and the driver reached the 11 hour driving limit at 12:30 p.m. on Day 2 but still continued to drive for another 1/2 hour.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: On both Day 1 and Day 2, the driver never spent more than 8 consecutive hours on duty or driving and therefore, no violation occurred on either day.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: Calculation of the 14 hour limit begins at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. At midnight on Day 1, the driver still had 9 hours remaining because any sleeper berth period of at least 8 but less than 10 consecutive hours is excluded from the 14 hour calculation. By 4:00 a.m. on Day 2, the driver had 5 hours remaining (14 - 3 - 2 1/2 - 1 1/2 - 2 = 5). The driver then took a break of at least 2 consecutive hours, making him or her eligible for the split sleeper berth provision. This moves the calculation point to the end of the first of the two qualifying periods of rest, or 10:00 p.m. on Day 1. The next 14 hour calculation starts there, and the driver reached the end of the 14 hour duty period at noon on Day 2 and drove for 1 hour over the 14 hour limit.

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Is the below example a completed 34 hour restart?

Day 1

Day 2

  • None of these answers are correct
  • No, the driver didn't spend enough time off duty to complete the restart
  • Yes, the restart has been completed
  • No, the driver didn't complete two rest periods between 1:00 a.m. and 5:00 a.m.
This is a question from page 105 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Day 1





Day 2






Explanation - 34 Hour Restart: This example shows a 34 hour restart which is incomplete. While the driver took a total of 34 hours off duty from 4:00 a.m. on Day 1 until 4:00 p.m. on Day 2 (total of 36 hours off duty) the driver still did not meet the requirements. Two rest periods must be taken between the hours of 1:00 a.m. to 5:00 a.m. and in this example, only one rest period during those hours were completed (Day 2). This driver is not necessarily in violation of any rules, but he/she still must count back the previous 8 days when calculating the 70 hour limit as the 34 hour break did not reset the 70 hour limit.

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Which log below contains at least one violation?

Day 1

Day 2

  • Day 2
  • Both day 1 and day 2
  • There are no violations in this example
  • Day 1
This is a question from page 99 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Day 1

Day 2

Violations: There is a 30 minute break violation in this example from 6:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m and 11:00 p.m. to Midnight on Day 1.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: On Day 1, the driver drove from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. (5 hours) then again from 6:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. (4 hours) and finally from 11:00 p.m. to Midnight (1 hour). Therefore, the driver drove for a total of 10 hours on Day 1 (5 + 4 + 1) and never violated the 11 hour limit. On Day 2, the driver only drove between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. for a total of 4 hours, thus, no violation of the 11 hour limit occurred.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: On Day 1, the calculation point for the 30 minute break provision is 10:00 a.m. In order to continue driving beyond 6:00 p.m. (8 hours after the initial starting calculation point) a 30 minute break off duty must be taken. Since the driver never took a break off duty, a 30 minute break violation occurred between the hours of 6:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. The driver then went on duty between the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 11:00 p.m., before violating the 30 minute break provision again by driving a CMV between 11:00 p.m. and Midnight. In order to remain legal, the driver should have taken his/her 30 minute break by 6:00 p.m. On Day 2, the driver was only on duty for a total of 7 consecutive hours which would not require a 30 minute break.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: After taking 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 14 hours available beginning at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. The driver switched into the sleeper berth at Midnight, exactly 14 hours later. Since the driver remained in the sleeper for 10 consecutive hours, the 14 hour limit reset and the new starting calculation point was then 10:00 a.m. on Day 2. The driver only remained on duty from the hours of 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. for a total of 7 hours of on duty time on Day 2. The driver remined legal on both days and no violation occurred.

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Which statement below is false?
  • Your logbook can be checked by your carrier at anytime
  • Your logbook can be randomly checked anytime you go through a weigh station
  • The increased use of electronic logging devices has forced carriers to crack down on HOS violations
  • Non-DOT law enforcement officers need probable cause to inspect your logbook
This is a question from page 92 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Who Enforces HOS Regulations?

Law enforcement:

Generally, DOT officers are the ones who enforce HOS rules, although any police officer may inspect a driver's logbook. Individual states are responsible for maintaining weigh stations where drivers are pulled in for random vehicle and logbook inspections. Drivers may also be pulled over for random checks by police officers or DOT officials at any time and have their logbooks inspected. While it's not a frequent occurrence, chances are your logbook will be checked every now and then. Be ready for it at all times!

Carriers:

In addition to law enforcement and DOT officials, most carriers have their own company policies regarding logbooks. A drivers logs are frequently reviewed by internal auditors for discrepancies or violations. A driver with too many violations might be warned, disciplined, or terminated (terminating a driver usually only occurs after several violations). The increased use of electronic logging devices (discussed later) has forced carriers to crack down on HOS violations even more.

TruckingTruth's Advice:

Your logbook could be checked at anytime for any reason. Make sure it is always updated!

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Which violations have occurred in the below example?

Day 1

Day 2

  • There is a 14 hour violation only
  • There is a 14 hour violation and an 11 hour violation
  • There is a 14 hour violation and a 30 minute break violation
  • There is an 11 hour violation only
This is a question from page 101 - click here to look up the answer

Quote From Page 0 Of The Illinois CDL Manual:

Day 1

Day 2

Violations: There is an 11 hour rule violation from 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m., and a 14 hour rule violation from 7:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m., both on Day 2.

Explanation - 11 Hour Limit: After 10 consecutive hours off duty, the driver had 11 hours of driving time available at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. The driver did not have another 10 hour break (or the equivalent) until 1:00 p.m. on Day 2, so the calculation point never changes. The driver accumulated 7 total hours of driving on Day 1 and reached the 11 hour limit at 11:00 a.m. on Day 2. The violation began when the driver continued driving after that limit.

Explanation - 30 Minute Break: Since the longest consecutive stretch of on duty time was only 6 hours, the driver was never required to take a 30 minute break on either Day 1 or Day 2.

Explanation - 14 Hour Limit: Calculation of the 14 hour limit starts at 10:00 a.m. on Day 1. The 14 hour limit was reached at midnight, and the driver violated the 14 hour rule by driving a CMV starting at 7:00 a.m. on Day 2.

To remain in compliance: The driver should have stayed in the sleeper berth for one additional hour during one of the two sleeper berth breaks. This would have given the driver the equivalent of 10 hours off duty, making him or her eligible for the sleeper berth provision. This would have moved the calculation point to the end of the first of the two breaks (10:00 p.m. on Day 1) and the driver would have remained in compliance on Day 2, in this example.

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[2,1,3,1,4,4,4,2]
8

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